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Health

Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of June 7

Airman First Class Emily Riddles, assigned to 156th aeromedical evacuation squadron, North Carolina Air National Guard, prepares a COVID-19 vaccine shot at Central Prison, Raleigh, North Carolina, Jan. 21, 2021.
Sgt. Jamar Marcel Pugh
/
North Carolina Army National Guard photo
Airman First Class Emily Riddles, assigned to 156th aeromedical evacuation squadron, North Carolina Air National Guard, prepares a COVID-19 vaccine shot at Central Prison, Raleigh, North Carolina, Jan. 21, 2021.

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of June 1.


June 11, 2021

1:54 p.m. – Gov. Roy Cooper’s executive order spelling out state-wide pandemic-related restrictions expires Friday. He said Thursday he’ll replace it with another, but didn’t offer specifics.

State Republican leaders have pressed Cooper on when he’ll lift the state of emergency under which the orders are issued. Cooper says it lets the state waive regulations that would slow vaccinations, and keeps federal funds flowing that cover some costs of fighting the pandemic.

“Emergency management, we’re are paying national guard soldiers to help us administer vaccines and to do other jobs,” Cooper said. “There are a lot of other streams of federal money that are important in an emergency situation.”

Cooper has already lifted most state restrictions. Masks and social distancing are now only required in a handful of settings including schools and healthcare facilities. Most children haven't been vaccinated yet, and no vaccine has yet been approved for those under 12. – Jay Price, WUNC

7:05 a.m. - State leaders have resorted to dangling cash — big cash — to persuade fence-sitters to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Four lucky winners in drawings spread across the summer will walk away with $1 million each, at least, before taxes. Gov. Roy Cooper announced the new program yesterday.

Cooper says it's modeled after programs like Ohio’s, where vaccinations jumped 28% after similar drawings were announced.

All vaccinated adults in North Carolina are eligible for the million-dollar prizes. The newly-vaccinated get two entries per drawing. Teenagers could win college scholarships. - Jay Price, WUNC

June 9, 2021

7:05 a.m. - Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper says he won't build a domed stadium in downtown Charlotte in the post-COVID era.

Tepper had said in 2019 he hoped to build a retractable roof stadium in Charlotte within the next 10 years to attract other major sporting events. In remarks on Tuesday, he said there's now "no way" he'd do that now. The COVID-19 pandemic turned the sports world upside down and prompted venues to limit seating for fans, especially indoors. – Amy Jeffries, WUNC

June 8, 2021

1:48 p.m. - Duke wants its stadiums to be packed with Blue Devils fans again. The university's sports venues will return to full capacity this fall. The university made the announcement as tickets for the upcoming football season went on sale. Duke is encouraging fans to get vaccinated against COVID-19 before going to an event on campus. The university announced in April it's requiring students to get vaccinated in order to enroll for the fall semester. – Naomi Prioleau, WUNC

11:37 a.m. - The city of Raleigh is facing a hiring shortage as the recreation department tries to quickly fill positions at its pools for the summer. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are still being felt by Raleigh's recreation department, even as life is returning to normal. Officials say they are usually recruiting and training people to work at their pools year round. But last year, that didn't happen.

Billy Aubut is the recreation superintendent for the city of Raleigh.

“We stopped,” Aubut said. “We didn't do any new lifeguard training until probably winter break. this past December. We held a few re-certification trainings for existing staff, but usually we are accumulating staff throughout the year."

Aubut says he hopes more people will apply as lifeguards so they can gain valuable life skills. - Naomi Prioleau, WUNC

June 7, 2021

12:38 p.m. - Polling in April suggested at least 60 percent of the North Carolina Adult population would get a COVID-19 vaccine. Health leaders are still pushing to reach that mark.

Four out of five older adults have taken the vaccine. But the same is true for just over half of all adults, meaning younger and middle-aged adults are being more hesitant. UNC Physicians Network regional administrator Heather Rouse says providers are working hard to offer North Carolinians good information about the safety and efficacy of the vaccine.

“Access has improved,” Rouse said. “At this point, I think we continue to face the hurdle of education."

Orange, Durham and Wake are among the counties in North Carolina with the highest vaccination rates. - Jason deBruyn, WUNC

11:20 a.m. - As the second school year disrupted by the pandemic winds down, summer school plans are taking shape around the country. An influx of federal funding included in COVID-19 rescue legislation is letting districts broaden programming and offer spots to more students than ever before. The Biden administration is requiring states to pour at least $1.2 billion into summer enrichment programs. Districts also must reserve at least 20% of the windfall to address learning loss, which could include summer school, with a focus on students who have been most affected by the shift away from in-person learning. – The Associated Press


This post is compiled and edited by Elizabeth Baier, Jason deBruyn, Laura Pellicer and Mitchell Northam.


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