Will Michaels

General Assignment Reporter/ Host, "Morning Edition"

Will Michaels started his professional radio career at WUNC.

He was first an intern while studying at UNC-Chapel Hill. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC after graduation in 2010 as the producer for the local broadcast of Morning Edition, rising before the sun to help host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He joined the team for The State of Things later that year.

In 2016, Will became WUNC's first Daily News Producer, creating content for WUNC newscasts and periodically filling in as host for Morning Edition or All Things Considered.

In 2020, Will moved from producing to reporting full time as WUNC's General Assingment Reporter. He now hosts Morning Edition each Friday.

Ways to Connect

UNC Health Care
UNC Health Care / UNC Health Care

Doctors at UNC-Chapel Hill say early studies of monoclonal antibody therapies show promising results in treating COVID-19.

Mike Pence coronavirus Florida
Wilfredo Lee / AP

Vice President Mike Pence will be in Raleigh on Thursday to promote an anti-abortion agenda, GOP candidates and to make campaign stops for President Donald Trump.

Courtesy Juan Pleitez

21-year-old Juan Pleitez thought he'd be making the drive from Raleigh to Charlotte to cast his vote as a first-time delegate to the Republican National Convention. Instead, he watched from home this week while a much smaller group officially renominated President Trump.

File photo of college students, with the assistance of their families, moving in for the fall semester at N.C. State University in Raleigh, N.C., Friday, July 31, 2020.
Gerry Broome / AP

North Carolina State University told students remaining in university housing to go home Wednesday, acknowledging a rising number of COVID-19 clusters occurring in both on-campus and off-campus housing.

Mark-Anthony Middleton, Durham City Councilman
City of Durham, via Flickr / https://bit.ly/32jlgHc

A member of the Durham City Council is proposing a pilot program that would give a basic income to the city's poorest residents.

Councilman Mark-Anthony Middleton describes the idea as a 12 to 18-month experiment that would give 200 to 300 people up to $1,000 a month.

Ebony West
Courtesy of Ebony West

The all-virtual Democratic National Convention ends tonight with a speech from the party's presidential nominee, Joe Biden.

This week, Democratic delegates from across the country, including North Carolina, have joined the convention mostly from their homes.

Raleigh Police Cruiser
PDpolicecars, via Flickr / https://bit.ly/2Q7UmMD

Raleigh Police are creating a new unit that would send both officers and social workers to certain calls.

  Credit Namerifrats29 via Flickr / https://bit.ly/2E4pyJV Edit | Remove

  

The Greensboro City Council will consider stricter requirements for police officers to conduct searches when they do not have probable cause.

South Pointe Apartments Facebook

Residents in a mental health and substance abuse treatment program that has a troubled past say they were recently locked out of the agency's apartments in Greensboro.

A Grubhub delivery driver picks up two boxes of pizza
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

A report from UNC Chapel Hill says there's a higher probability of death from COVID-19 in some of North Carolina's rural counties.

Electric meter
Kevin Harber, via Creative Commons / https://bit.ly/30ykzck

The North Carolina Utilities Commission says nearly 1.5 million customers in the state have been delinquent in payments during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Utilities Commission says the unpaid bills amount to nearly $260 million.

Market House Fayetteville
City of Fayetteville, Andrew Johnson / https://bit.ly/3fzhb7j

Protesters have deconstructed a camp that stood in front of the Market House in Fayetteville for nearly a week.

But they've vowed to return if the city council does not meet their demands for police reform.

This week in state politics: North Carolina lawmakers failed to override the governor's vetoes so that gyms and skating rinks that were shutdown because of the pandemic could reopen. But in court, a group of bowling alleys won their argument that they're no riskier than resturants operating at limited capacity. 

Meanwhile, the tension over how Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper is calling the shots during the COVID-19 emergency brought an abrupt end to a meeting of top state elected officials. 

Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch and Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation discuss those developments, plus record-breaking fundraising in the U.S. Senate race, and one early outcome of protests over police misconduct. 
 


NC Legislative building
NC General Assembly

The Republican-controlled General Assembly again fell short Wednesday in overriding several of Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's vetoes. The unsuccessful votes for the GOP mean directives within the governor's COVID-19 executive orders that keep many businesses closed remain intact.

Wake County Seal
City of Raleigh/Flickr / https://bit.ly/2ZGGH3x

A North Carolina county's board of commissioners will vote Monday to make Juneteenth a county holiday, and to declare racism as a public health crisis.

Mayor Steve Schewel stands for a portrait inside Durham City Hall.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

The new fiscal year started this week, a time when local governments implement the new budgets they spent months working on over the spring.

In the city of Durham, that budget has been the subject of a protest for several weeks now. In particular, demonstrators object to a 5% increase in funding for the city’s police department, which is getting more than $70 million over the next year.

In this Sunday, June 21 image, a message of 'DEFUND' points to the Durham Police Headquarters. The street art was painted as part of the Black Lives Matter protests in the city.
Chuck Liddy / For WUNC

In the month since George Floyd’s killing sparked protests nationwide, some demonstrators in Durham have literally taken their message to the police.

A crowd gathers in downtown Raleigh on Tuesday night to protest the death of George Floyd and violence against black Americans.
Kate Medley / For WUNC

Daily protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis have spread across North Carolina. While the message of these demonstrations is slightly different in each city, there has been a broad call for overhauling the way police officers do their jobs.

Melissa Sue Gerrits / Carolina Public Press, via AP

Police officers in Fayetteville took a knee in solidarity with protesters Monday, two days after the city had experienced violence and looting.

Rudell leans against a white wall while holding a mug.
Yuri Vaysgant Photography

As a holiday weekend typically celebrated with travel and social gatherings approaches, Governor Roy Cooper announced the state’s plans for proceeding with Phase Two of reopening. 

The state's nursing homes and elder care facilities are improving, according to a new study.
SalFalko / Flickr

Operators of long-term care facilities say their staff members are quitting at a higher rate during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Cooper sitting leaned over a table with reporters standing behind him.
NC Governor Roy Cooper

Hundreds of people protested Gov. Roy Cooper’s stay-at-home restrictions for churches in Raleigh Thursday morning.

N.C. Secretary of Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen.
N.C. Department of Public Safety

State health officials say early results from antibody tests show a small percentage of North Carolinians have been exposed to the coronavirus.

Drew Shindell, Duke University Professor of Earth Science
Duke University

Environmental experts at Duke University say the COVID-19 pandemic could have wide-ranging implications for the way the world produces and consumes energy.

Paying The Rent

May 4, 2020

The National Multifamily Housing Council reported last month that nearly one-third of apartment renters in the country had not paid their rent in April. The numbers were slightly better in North Carolina, but they are on track to be worse this month. Gov. Roy Cooper signed two emergency funding bills today that could help, but the pandemic has forced tenants and landlords to come up with answers mostly on the fly.

Today, we examine how rentals have changed during the pandemic and get a glimpse of how tenants are coping and how landlords are adapting in Durham, a city where the housing market has been booming, but where most tenants were already spending more than 30% of their incomes on rent.

We speak with Peter Gilbert, supervising attorney at Legal Aid of North Carolina in the Durham eviction diversion program, and Michelle Ketchum, owner of Acorn and Oak Property Management Company in Durham.


North Carolina House Democrats held a virtual press conference to promote Medicaid expansion.
NC House Democrats / Twitter

Some Democrats in the General Assembly are again pushing for Medicaid expansion as state lawmakers debate emergency funding proposals during the pandemic. 

A group of Democrats in the state House on Wednesday rolled out a bill that would repeal a law preventing North Carolina from expanding Medicaid under the federal Affordable Care Act.

Anastasiia Chepinska / Unsplash

North Carolina banks and other lenders are trying to keep up with a surge of applications for small business disaster loans during the coronavirus pandemic.  

Gov. Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency on Tuesday, 3/10/2020 in response to more confirmed cases of the coronavirus in North Carolina.
Jay Price / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper has signed an executive order mandating new social distancing measures at retail stores. 

The order requires businesses limit the number of people inside at one time to no more than 20% of the capacity allowed by the fire code.

It also encourages business owners to provide hand sanitizer to their customers, create special shopping hours for older adults, and install shields at check-out counters.

Smart Start
Smart Start

Administrators of North Carolina's early childhood education program estimate the COVID-19 crisis could cause up to one-third of child care facilities to close if they don't get immediate financial relief from the N.C. Legislature.

Child care centers are getting subsidies from the state Department of Health and Human Services during the pandemic – but leaders of Smart Start they say it's not enough to make up for lost revenue.

State Employees Association of North Carolina
State Employees Association of North Carolina

The organization that represents state employees is calling on Governor Roy Cooper and the legislature to approve hazard pay for some state workers, and send others home.

Pages