U.S. Navy Mess Attendant First Class Doris Miller speaking during his war bond tour stop at the Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill. on Jan. 7, 1943.
U.S. Navy photo courtesy of the National Archives

A Military 1st: A Supercarrier Is Named After African American Sailor

Henry Kissinger called supercarriers "100,000 tons of diplomacy," and that power has long been reflected in the Navy's conventions for naming them. Most are named for U.S. presidents. The USS John F. Kennedy. The Reagan. The Lincoln.The Navy now is quietly charting a new course. A supercarrier now on the drawing boards will be christened the USS Doris Miller.

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NC National Guard Covid Mask
U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell, via Flickr / https://bit.ly/349yfMJ

Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of Sept. 28

Debate Organizers Say They Will Make Format Changes For Next Time

Updated at 4:16 p.m. ET After a debate plagued by interruptions and cross-talk — mostly from President Trump — many politicos, voters and journalists asked whether more could have been done to stop the chaos. Some asked whether the debates should continue at all. The Commission on Presidential Debates, the independent, nonpartisan group that has sponsored the debates since 1988, responded Wednesday, saying it is considering changes to the format before the next matchup: The Commission on...

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Explore our coverage as you prepare for this year's election in North Carolina.

Governor Roy Cooper and members of the state Coronavirus Task Force are scheduled to share updates on COVID-19.

Watch here live, starting at 2 p.m.

Appalachian State University
Appalachian State University

The University of North Carolina system reported its first coronavirus-related student death on Tuesday since several campuses reopened with at least partial in-person learning last month.

A movie poster saying a fascinating adventure into the unknown! There is a yellow tiger being poked by a small white man next to a large pair of scissors, matches, and white sewing thread
Flickr / Creative Commons

One of the truest forms of horror Hollywood ever depicts is the story of mankind abandoned, disoriented or forgotten. Whether it’s a film about being lost at sea like Robert Zemeckis’ “Cast Away” or one about being so miniscule that your spouse believes you’ve been eaten by the family cat — as was the case in the 1957 sci-fi film “The Incredible Shrinking Man,” — movies about isolation force viewers to confront some of their worst fears.

A Wake County Public Schools bus.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

Students will be returning to classrooms in Wake County next month.

Burlington Royals MiLB
Courtesy of the Burlington Royals

Major League Baseball started the process of eliminating minor league affiliates Tuesday, with the Appalachian League converted to a college summer circuit for rising freshmen and sophomores.

With more than one million deaths worldwide, it can feel nearly impossible to fully grasp the toll COVID-19 has taken across the globe. The consistent stress of the pandemic, and an ever-increasing death count can sometimes be too much for our brains to comprehend. 

Host Dave DeWitt talks with Elke Weber, professor of psychology, public affairs, energy, and the environment at Princeton University, about adapting to stress and numbness tied to the pandemic.

Dave also highlights a recent study that examined ghost forests along the North Carolina coast and how they serve as indicators of climate change’s consequences.


North Carolina's ballot stretches well beyond the top of the ticket. One big question looming in 2020 is whether Democrats will regain control of at least one chamber of the General Assembly, or if Republicans will hang on to the reins with their simple majority. 

On this episode of the Politics Podcast, host Jeff Tiberii dives into a key state senate race in New Hanover County. He speaks with the University of  North Carolina Wilmington's Aaron King about the political landscape for legislative races. And Democratic Sen. Harper Peterson discusses how President Trump's presence on the ballot plays into his bid for reelection in closely contested District 9. 



Three women wearing white lab coats, masks, face shields and gloves stood around a table on a recent afternoon at LabCorp's Burlington headquarters, using box cutters to open packages. Inside each package was a box containing a plastic sample tube.

These are the company’s at-home coronavirus test kits. They’re among the tens of thousands of coronavirus test swabs from across the U.S. that the North Carolina lab location receives daily.

In NC, Consequences Of Postal Service Slowdown Extend Beyond The Mailbox

Sep 29, 2020
US Postal Services boxes
Nick Ochsner / NC Watchdog Reporting Network

By the time headlines across the country began to detail concerns over the U.S. Postal Service, Brunswick County resident Robert Brunson had already suffered the consequences. 

A diabetic, Brunson regularly ordered his medication online through a mail-order pharmacy. That process normally took two to three days. In August, it took 10.

"I ran out," he said.

A photo of a sign saying 'Vote' with an arrow on a pole.
hjl // Flickr

While going to the ballot box on Election Day is an important ritual for many voters, the coronavirus pandemic has introduced a change in routine. As of Tuesday, Sept. 28, the North Carolina State Board of Elections has received more than a million absentee ballot requests. At this time in 2016, the Board of Elections had received just over 100,000. While some voters hope to stay healthy by avoiding the polls, mail-in voting still presents some anxiety and uncertainty, especially for historically disenfranchised voters like African Americans and Latinos.

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WUNC Commits To Anti-Racism

Black lives matter. WUNC believes this because it is true, and truth fuels what we do at North Carolina Public Radio. WUNC does not believe that saying Black lives matter is a political statement, or supportive of any single organization, or that it conflicts with our journalistic mission. In fact, saying and believing that Black lives matter enhances that journalistic mission, by acknowledging the various levels of systemic racism with which our social, political and corporate establishments...

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Tested Podcast

Tested is a hard look at how North Carolina and its neighbors face the day's challenges. Hosted by journalists Dave DeWitt and Leoneda Inge.

Sex and relationships are intimate – and sometimes intimidating to talk about. Host Anita Rao guides us on an exploration of our brains and our bodies that touches down in taboo territory.

The State of Things

A photo of a sign saying 'Vote' with an arrow on a pole.
hjl // Flickr

Being Heard At The Polls Is Still A Struggle For Many North Carolinians

While going to the ballot box on Election Day is an important ritual for many voters, the coronavirus pandemic has introduced a change in routine. As of Tuesday, Sept. 28, the North Carolina State Board of Elections has received more than a million absentee ballot requests. At this time in 2016, the Board of Elections had received just over 100,000. While some voters hope to stay healthy by avoiding the polls, mail-in voting still presents some anxiety and uncertainty, especially for historically disenfranchised voters like African Americans and Latinos.

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NC Reckons With Racial Injustice

What you need to know about the protests and policies across the state.

The 2020 Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the outbreak and response – across the globe and in North Carolina.

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Education Stories

A Wake County Public Schools bus.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

Students will be returning to classrooms in Wake County next month.

Cole del Charco / WUNC

Camp Kanata, a YMCA overnight camp, would normally be empty during the week this time of the year. Instead, the camp outside the town of Wake Forest has been transformed. 

wileydoc / Flickr

North Carolina State University announced a return to in-person classes and on-campus living for the spring semester yesterday. The school closed in late August after a rise in COVID-19 cases. School reopenings led to spikes in cases across the country, according to a new study co-authored by two North Carolina-based professors — as many as 3,000 cases per day. 

Charles Jacocks, rear, along with his wife Carrie and incoming freshman Ann Grace, right, carry their belongings as college students begin moving in for the fall semester at N.C. State University in Raleigh, N.C., Friday, July 31, 2020.
Gerry Broome / AP

A new study links college reopenings to spikes in COVID-19 cases across the country. The study is co-authored by UNC Greensboro economics professor Martin Andersen, Davidson College education professor Chris Marsicano and others. Marsicano is also the Director of the College Crisis Initiative.

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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.