Courtesy of LeKeshia Liles

1 in 5 Childcare Workers Lack Health Insurance, Heightening Their Fears Of COVID-19

COVID-19 outbreaks are springing up at a handful of childcare centers across North Carolina, threatening a vulnerable workforce of women who are largely low-paid and often uninsured.

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Keisha Lance Bottoms, A Possible Biden VP Pick, Sees Profile Rise Amid Crises

One of a series of reports looking at Joe Biden's potential running mates Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, one of several candidates said to be under consideration as Joe Biden's presidential running mate, has seen her profile rise fast in recent weeks as the first-term mayor has spoken out against the state of Georgia's Republican-led pandemic response and spoken forcefully to protesters in her city. Her early loyalty to the former vice president also stands out. Bottoms endorsed Biden...

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Protesters calling for the removal of Confederate monument in Graham, North Carolina, face off with Confederate sympathizers on Saturday, July 11, 2020.
Jason de Bruyn / WUNC

There were tense moments in Graham over the weekend, as Black Lives Matter demonstrators came face-to-face with Confederate sympathizers.

The Old Well on the UNC- Chapel Hill campus.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

A UNC Chapel Hill commission voted Friday to recommend removing the names of four prominent white supremacists from campus buildings. The resolution will go to university Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz and the UNC Chapel Hill Board of Trustees for consideration.

This week in state politics: North Carolina lawmakers failed to override the governor's vetoes so that gyms and skating rinks that were shutdown because of the pandemic could reopen. But in court, a group of bowling alleys won their argument that they're no riskier than resturants operating at limited capacity. 

Meanwhile, the tension over how Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper is calling the shots during the COVID-19 emergency brought an abrupt end to a meeting of top state elected officials. 

Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch and Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation discuss those developments, plus record-breaking fundraising in the U.S. Senate race, and one early outcome of protests over police misconduct. 
 


North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper sits for an interview with WUNC in the Executive Mansion in Raleigh, N.C., Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Cooper addressed the opiod crisis affecting the state.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

A new state criminal justice panel formed in the wake of George Floyd's killing had its first meeting this week. The North Carolina Task Force for Racial Equity in Criminal Justice is charged with finding solutions to racial disparities in North Carolina's criminal justice system.

The personal loss of a loved one leads host Leoneda Inge to reflect deeply on the recent experience of saying goodbye during the pandemic.

Despite social distancing and stay-at-home orders preventing large groups from gathering together, Black communities have still found ways to mourn the loss of family and friends.  Whether it’s live streaming a service, mandating face masks, limiting attendance or offering creative kinds of support to relatives, people are adapting to the current challenges of organizing funerals and memorials.

Inge also talks with Nina Jones Mason, manager of Ellis D. Jones & Sons Funeral Directors, about grieving during this unique time.


Most high schools in the region have delayed football practice because of the coronavirus pandemic. One exception is Lake Norman High School in Iredell County, where coaches and players are practicing football differently this year.

Woman sits in the shower shaving her legs
Credit: Betsssssy//Flickr//CC

Women’s war with body hair has claimed many casualties since hair removal and femininity became linked in the late 1800s. 

Women's Theatre Festival

Theater is constantly moving between mediums. From radio plays to vaudeville’s transformation into televised variety shows, actors and technicians now find their stage to be TikTok and Twitch. 

Protesters in downtown Graham hold a Black Lives Matter flag on July 1, 2020.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

On July 1, a warm and muggy evening, a group of about 50 people gathered in downtown Graham to protest police brutality and racism. Most who drove by raised a clenched fist or thumbs up in support. Some flashed a different finger and had a different message.

This group of protesters followed very specific instructions. They stayed only in their designated corner of the small downtown square, located about halfway between Durham and Greensboro. And they stayed behind orange cones that police said were there for their protection.

Danita Mason-Hogans seated on the porch at the Duke Center for Documentary Studies
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Danita Mason-Hogans traces back her family's roots in Chapel Hill seven generations on both sides.

"My family's history is deeply connected to the University," Mason-Hogans said.

Her father's side of the family were Masons and Nunns, two prominent family names in Chapel Hill connected to a plantation that was where the current UNC-Chapel Hill Friday Center stands. Her grandfather worked 53 years at the Carolina Inn and her mother was one of the first Black admissions officers at the University.

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NC Reckons With Racial Injustice

What you need to know about the protests and policies across the state.

Tested Podcast

Tested is a hard look at how North Carolina and its neighbors face the day's challenges. Hosted by journalists Dave DeWitt and Leoneda Inge.

The State of Things

Woman sits in the shower shaving her legs
Credit: Betsssssy//Flickr//CC

Embodied: Our Tangled Relationship With Body Hair

Women’s war with body hair has claimed many casualties since hair removal and femininity became linked in the late 1800s.

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The 2020 Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the outbreak and response – across the globe and in North Carolina.

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Education Stories

brayan guevara
Lynn Hey

Some people choose their life's path. For others, it’s seemingly chosen for them. For 19-year-old Afro-Latino Brayan Guevara, his career goals can clearly be traced to his family.

Guevara comes from a long line of educators; his mother is a college instructor and his grandparents were teachers in Honduras.

Sign on college campus reading 'International Student Programs' with an arrow pointing to the left. Street with cars in the background.
Bellevue College//Flickr//CC

U.S. Immigration Customs and Enforcement has issued a new temporary rule banning international students from returning to or remaining in the United States if their colleges move to online-only instruction this fall.

Illustration of a calculator and exam answers sheet.
WikiHow Images

School board meetings are buzzing with suggestions of segmented days, converted spaces, private-public partnerships and other ideas for a managed reopening of public schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Collins sits at a table under a George Floyd mural that reads "George Floyd Rest in Power."
Courtesy of Armando Collins

For Armondo Collins, growing up in a predominantly-black neighborhood in St. Paul, Minnesota meant several things. It meant that he had to pass through majority white, wealthy communities whenever he wanted candy from the corner store. And it meant that he got stopped by the police a lot. 

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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.