Keri Brown / WFDD

Corralling COVID-19 In Meatpacking And Poultry Processing Plants

Across the country, more than 250 employees at meatpacking plants have died of the coronavirus. Congress has opened an investigation into the outbreaks as the companies try to stem the COVID infections.

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Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Rollout Begins In U.S. As COVID-19 Cases Tick Up

Johnson & Johnson has begun shipping nearly 4 million doses of its newly authorized COVID-19 vaccine across the U.S., officials said Monday, and is expected to further scale up supply in the coming weeks and months. "We think literally within about the next 24 to 48 hours, Americans should start receiving shots in arms," Alex Gorsky, Johnson & Johnson's CEO and chairman of the board, told NBC's Today . Both the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

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Apex Police Vehicle
Nick B. / via Flickr

A report on the Apex Police Department says racial bias is entrenched in its culture.

A photo of Sontina and Reggie Barnes
Sontina Barnes

When Sontina Barnes joined the Army in 1993, she was looking for something new.

“I was a junior at N.C. State and I was burned out,” she recalled.

At the time, she was working three jobs on top of school.

Governor Roy Cooper is easing COVID-19 restrictions, following pressure from the legislature, small business owners and parents. Meanwhile, under a proposed settlement with civil rights groups, 3,500 people who are incarcerated will be released in the next six months. And, the new chancellor of Fayetteville State is not being welcomed by all. Rob Schofield and Becki Gray review some of the stories from this week in North Carolina Politics.


Gerry Broome / AP Photo

The White House announced Friday morning that it will include North Carolina in its federal pilot program of community vaccination centers. Starting March 10, a Greensboro site will receive about 3,000 vaccines per day.

Black Home Ownership And The Promise Of Reparations

Feb 26, 2021

Priscilla Ndiaye Robinson looked across the empty fields where her Southside neighborhood once thrived. “It’s all gone,” she said. “One thousand two hundred businesses and homes were lost.” 

The neighborhood, where approximately half of Asheville’s Black population lived, suffered major upheaval under Asheville’s urban renewal program in the 1970s and 1980s, one of the largest urban renewal projects in the Southeastern United States.

In 1898, the elected government in Wilmington, N.C. was overthrown by white supremacists who sought to undermine Black progress. The impact of the violent insurrection still lingers in the city today and illuminates existing national political tensions. In this special episode, Phoebe Judge, host of the podcast “Criminal,” shares that show's exploration into events that led to the violence and its aftermath.
 

 

In this 2018 photo provided by Duke University, Sam Hammond, university carillonneur, plays the Duke Chapel carillon at the university in Durham, North Carolina. Hammond died Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021, in Durham, the university said in a news release.
Jared Lazarus / Duke University

When J. Samuel Hammond arrived as a freshman at Duke University in 1964, he knew nothing about the musical instrument that allowed a player to send melodies ringing across campus from the bells in the school's iconic chapel tower. A demonstration from a fellow student introduced him to the 50-bell carillon that would become his life's work as he played music that marked the end of the academic day for countless students.

A group of people standing on dark concrete with their arms extended upwards
Debora Cartagena//Pixnio

How comfortable do you feel in gyms, fitness studios and exercise classes? With COVID-19 in our midst, we all may feel a little iffy about spending time indoors with people breathing hard — but what about even before the pandemic? 

In and outside of gyms, we get inundated with messaging about what we should look like and how physically fit we should be. This fitness culture tells us that unless we exercise a certain way and achieve a certain ideal — of thinness, whiteness and heteronormative gender presentation — we’re doing it wrong.

An image of Letters To A Young Ghost
Courtesy of the artist

WUNC Music is excited to give you a first look at the video for 'Bluebird' by the Raleigh, NC electropop duo Letters To A Young Ghost. The video stars Jacki Huntington (of TOW3RS, Teevee Nicks, and See Gulls) and was also shot by Huntington after the duo sent her 15 balloons and asked her to film herself roller skating to the track.

Kristin Kanipe helps her three children paint a poster, while homeschooling on her back porch. Kristin is in a wheelchair and she and her children wear winter coats and masks.
Liz Schlemmer

Before the pandemic, Kristin Kanipe never expected she'd end up homeschooling her three kids.

"I remember talking to a friend and specifically saying, 'God would have to smack me in the head and make it "you have to homeschool" for me to ever homeschool.' I had no desire to homeschool. I actually did not want to homeschool," Kanipe said.

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Laura Pellicer / WUNC

WUNC Commits To Anti-Racism

Black lives matter. WUNC believes this because it is true, and truth fuels what we do at North Carolina Public Radio. WUNC does not believe that saying Black lives matter is a political statement, or supportive of any single organization, or that it conflicts with our journalistic mission. In fact, saying and believing that Black lives matter enhances that journalistic mission, by acknowledging the various levels of systemic racism with which our social, political and corporate establishments...

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The 2020 Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the outbreak and response – across the globe and in North Carolina.

Embodied Radio Show

A group of people standing on dark concrete with their arms extended upwards
Debora Cartagena//Pixnio

Fitness Culture, Deconstructed: No, You Don’t Have To ‘Burn It To Earn It’

How comfortable do you feel in gyms, fitness studios and exercise classes? With COVID-19 in our midst, we all may feel a little iffy about spending time indoors with people breathing hard — but what about even before the pandemic? In and outside of gyms, we get inundated with messaging about what we should look like and how physically fit we should be. This fitness culture tells us that unless we exercise a certain way and achieve a certain ideal — of thinness, whiteness and heteronormative gender presentation — we’re doing it wrong.

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Tested Podcast

Tested is a hard look at how North Carolina and its neighbors face the day's challenges. Hosted by journalists Dave DeWitt and Leoneda Inge.

Sex and relationships are intimate – and sometimes intimidating to talk about. Host Anita Rao guides us on an exploration of our brains and our bodies that touches down in taboo territory.

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Education Stories

Kristin Kanipe helps her three children paint a poster, while homeschooling on her back porch. Kristin is in a wheelchair and she and her children wear winter coats and masks.
Liz Schlemmer

Before the pandemic, Kristin Kanipe never expected she'd end up homeschooling her three kids.

"I remember talking to a friend and specifically saying, 'God would have to smack me in the head and make it "you have to homeschool" for me to ever homeschool.' I had no desire to homeschool. I actually did not want to homeschool," Kanipe said.

Darrell Allison, president of Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina.
Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina

The UNC System Board of Governors has chosen one of its own former members, Darrell Allison, as the next chancellor of Fayetteville State University.

In this Oct. 26, 2021 file photo, Carolyn Griffin begins the first day of in person classes at Davis Drive Elementary in Cary, NC.
Kate Medley / for WUNC

A bill that would require every school district in North Carolina to provide in-person learning to students who want it has passed the General Assembly and is headed to the governor's desk.

Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

 

Updated at 8:30 p.m. on Feb. 11, 2021.

The chancellor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has clarified his role — and what he told university faculty — concerning the $2.5 million settlement involving the Silent Sam statue.

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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.