Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 14 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Marketplace and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with seven regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

Emissions of toxic mercury from North Carolina coal-fired power plants have dropped significantly in the last decade.

Jeff Tiberii: In 2002 the General Assembly enacted the Clean Smokestack Act, aimed at cutting emissions. The North Carolina Division of Air Quality says the result is a 70-percent drop in toxic mercury entering the atmosphere. Tom Mather is with the division.

A new study on the use of tasers says there is no added risk if you're hit in the chest.

Jeff Tiberii: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center looked at 1200 real-life instances where law enforcement officers used a taser. Dr. William Bozeman is Director of Pre-Hospital Medicine at Wake Forest Baptist.

William Bozeman: And what we found was, that we could not see any higher rise of injury or problems or complications in people who had the tazer probes land across the front of the chest. And we thought that was very important.

With Congress back in session U.S. Senator Kay Hagan is touting a bill she says will help small businesses. Jeff Tiberii reports.

Jeff Tiberii: The Small Business Jobs and Tax Relief Act of 2012 is expected to come up for a vote this week. Hagan says the legislation has bipartisan support and will accomplish two things.

Kay Hagan: The first is an income tax credit on new payroll. And this is either through hiring new people or increasing current wages and there will be a 10-percent income tax credit to the small businesses.

A new study shows growth at High Point University has led to an increased economic impact on the local and state economy.

Jeff Tiberii: The report says that the annual economic impact has nearly tripled in just the last seven years. The private university with about 4-thousand undergrads has undergone a significant make-over during that time under President Nido Qubein.

In Winston-Salem a new president has been named to the Piedmont Triad Research Park. Jeff Tiberii has more.

Jeff Tiberii: Eric Tomlinson has been chosen by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center to lead the PTRP. Tomlimson has experience as both a scienctist and leader of several start-ups. That was a major draw for the leaders at Wake Forest, including Dr. John McConnell, the CEO of Baptist Medical Center.

Voters in Greensboro will not see a referendum for a new performing arts center on the November ballot.

Jeff Tiberii: A task force has been studying the feasibility of a new downtown arts venue. They had hoped a $20 million bond referendum would be posed to voters this fall. But the City Council ultimately decided it was not comfortable moving the issue forward. Ross Harris is one of 80 task force members working for the arts center.

Education leaders in Guilford County are looking at how private donations would affect public schools.

Jeff Tiberii: A group of parents at one Greensboro Elementary School wants to go beyond the average book or bake sale. They’re hoping to raise $1.5 million for a new building. School board members are considering both sides of an issue that would likely provide some schools with more private money than others. Chairman of the board Alan Duncan:

Clothing manufacturer Ralph Lauren has announced it will expand in North Carolina.

Jeff Tiberii: The company plans to add 500 jobs by the end of 2017 while also investing about $100 million. Ralph Lauren is the city’s fourth largest employer and will have nearly 2,000 local workers after these additions. Governor Bev Perdue says the growth is a positive sign for the economy.

John Edwards will not face another criminal trial on charges of alleged campaign finance violations.

ACLU
Jeff Tiberii

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit in Greensboro seeking expanded adoption rights for same-sex couples.

Thousands of residents in Guilford County have been without food stamps for several weeks.

Jeff Tiberii: Problems started last month when the county department of social services began using a new software program. Steve Hayes with social services says there were significant delays in processing, applications and re-certifications.

A new report is detailing the economic impact of arts in North Carolina.

Jeff Tiberii: The national study concludes nonprofit arts and cultural organizations in the state had a financial impact of 1.24 billion dollars during the 2010 fiscal year. That ‘impact’ figure includes ticket purchases, estimates on money spent before and after the show, and the salaries art professionals earn. Catherine Heitz New is with the Arts Concil of Forsyth County:

John Edwards' campaign finance case ended in a mistrial. Jurors came back yesterday and acquitted the former senator and presidential candidate on one charge and said they were deadlocked on five others. WUNC's Jeff Tiberii has been covering the trial since it started more than a month ago, he joins us from our bureau in Greensboro. 

What was it like in the courtroom when the jury's decision was announced?

In federal court jury deliberations begin an eighth day at the John Edwards trial today.

The sixth week of the John Edwards Trial begins with a seventh day of jury deliberations.

Jury deliberations continue for a third day this morning in the John Edwards trial at the federal courthouse in Greensboro.

At the John Edwards trial Jury deliberations continue this morning.

Jury deliberations will continue into next week at the John Edwards trial.

Closing arguments are scheduled to take place today at the John Edwards trial. The defense rested its case on Wednesday without putting the two-time presidential candidate, or former mistress Rielle Hunter on the witness stand.

Today could mark the final day of testimony in the John Edwards trial.

Defense attorneys could call two noteworthy witnesses today at the John Edwards Trial.

At the John Edwards trial the prosecution has rested, and today the defense is expected to ask the judge to dismiss the case all together.

John Edwards' fall from political prominence has continued in recent weeks, during his trial at a federal courthouse in Greensboro. After 24 witnesses and a more than a hundred pieces of evidence, the government has completed its case accusing Edwards of violating campaign finance law.

In the John Edwards trial, the government has indicated it could rest its case this afternoon.
 

A former John Edwards supporter will be under cross examination this morning in a federal courtroom.

Week three of the John Edwards Trial begins with a lawyer in the witness box.

It's day 10 of testimony at the John Edwards trial and a friend of billionaire Bunny Mellon is back on the stand.

At the John Edwards trial the pace of testimony has picked up.

The wife a former campaign staffer is back on the witness stand at the John Edwards federal corruption trial in Greensboro today.

In November of 2008 the Durham Performing Arts Center opened its doors to Broadway performances, and big name musical acts. By virtually all accounts D-PAC has been a success, welcoming more visitors and earning more money than many had expected. Now Greensboro is considering following suit. Residents, politicians and leaders of the arts community are discussing G-PAC. Supporters say the proposed 50 million dollar facility would boost the local economy and make the city a better place to live. But there are many questions: such as location, parking and would voters approve it?

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