Leoneda Inge

Race and Southern Culture Reporter

Leoneda Inge is WUNC's race and southern culture reporter. She is the first public radio journalist in the South to hold such a position, which explores modern and historical constructs to tell stories of poverty and wealth, health and food culture, education and racial identity.

Leoneda's most recent work of note includes the series “When a Rural North Carolina Clinic Closes,” produced in partnership with the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. Other recent work includes “50 Years of the Ebony Fashion Fair,” the debate surrounding “Race, Slavery & Monuments,” and the “Rebuilding of Princeville” after Hurricane Matthew.

In 2017, Leoneda was named Journalist of Distinction by the National Association of Black Journalists. Leoneda is a graduate of Florida A&M University and Columbia University, where she earned her Master's Degree in Journalism as a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Business and Economics. In 2014, she traveled to Berlin, Brussels and Prague as a German/American Journalist Exchange Fellow.
 

 

Ways to Connect

Chatham Confederate Monument
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Traffic moved slowly but orderly through Pittsboro, in Chatham County, on a recent day. Karen Howard, the driver, reached the traffic circle that can't be avoided. It's the circle around the Old Chatham courthouse.

Warren County, Community Health, Medicaid
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

People seeking health care in rural Warren County have waited a long time for good news. Now they're celebrating.

Cliff Parker
Elon University Office of Communications

Elon University joined other schools, community groups and law enforcement officials across the country for an inaugural National Day of Reconciliation. The idea was to improve relations between police and people of color.

Exonerated, When They See Us, Innocence PRoject
Netflix

Two exonerated members of what was known as the "Central Park Five," will speak at Duke University Monday night. The detailed story of the "Central Park Five" played out for all to see in the critically acclaimed Netflix mini series, "When They See Us." Netflix said the series, written and directed by Ava DuVernay, was their most-watched series.

NC State Parks, State Parks, Eno River
Leoneda Inge

Visitation at state parks across the state is bustling in some places and still recovering from Hurricane Florence in others.

A lot of trees fell down, bridges got washed out and there was water erosion at many state parks after the hurricane.

Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris attends a worship service at St. Joseph AME Church in Durham, N.C., Sunday, Aug 25, 2019.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Kamala Harris shook a lot of hands and took a lot of selfies when she was in Durham over the weekend. But while some people paid thousands of dollars to take a professional photo with the U.S. Senator and hopeful President, it was clear that her real friend is the new pastor of St. Joseph AME Church – the Rev. Jonathan Augustine.

Algonquin Tennis Club, Tennis, Durham, Arthur Ashe, Black Sports
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A North Carolina Historical Highway Marker was unveiled Thursday, celebrating the all-black Algonquin Tennis Club. Tennis fans of all ages stood in front of the W. D. Hill Parks and Recreation Center in Durham for the unveiling on Fayetteville Street.

Freeman Vines holds a guitar that he carved out of wood thought to be from a tree that was used as a "hanging tree" in lynchings
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

The life of an aging blues or folk musician is not always pretty. Many of these old soulsters have not been able to retire with dignity. For the past 25 years, the Music Maker Relief Foundation has worked to improve the lives of these musicians. It has literally saved the lives and the music of more than 400 artists.

Madeline Gray / For WUNC

During the regular school year, Ty Mathis is a math and science teacher in the Alamance-Burlington School System. This summer, he's teaching mostly middle school African-American boys at a Bridge to Medical School Camp in Graham. The camp is designed to encourage boys of color to consider medical school.

Phil Freelon, Architect, ALS
Jeffrey Camarati / Courtesy of PNC

Phil Freelon, the decorated architect most celebrated for his work on the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History And Culture, has died. He was 66.

Rogers Road, Sewer, Environmental Justice, Orange County
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Orange County officials are reaching out to residents in the historic Rogers Road community to expedite sewer service. The historically African-American Rogers Road community has waited more than 40 years for water and sewer.

NC Rural Center, Rural Counties, Small Business
NC Rural Center

A recent report from the North Carolina Rural Center shows small businesses in rural North Carolina have been disappearing at what some call an alarming rate.

Historic Preservation, NCCU, College Heights, National Register
Leoneda Inge

A well-known African American neighborhood in Durham has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The College Heights Historic District makes up 12 city blocks in southeast Durham. One reason for its name – the neighborhood is bordered by North Carolina Central University – a historically black institution.

Fight for 15, Minimum Wage, McDonald's
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Democratic presidential candidates joined McDonald’s fast-food workers and supporters yesterday to push the corporation to unionize its employees and pay them $15 dollars an hour. Julián Castro, a Democratic presidential hopeful and former mayor of San Antonio, Texas, marched and rallied with low-wage workers in downtown Durham.

Historic Stagville, Stagville, Slavery, Durham
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

This Mother’s Day weekend, the Stagville State Historic Site in Durham is remembering the enslaved women who once toiled on the plantation. Researchers are still discovering the voices of these women.

Howard Lee, Chapel Hill, Civil Rights
Town of Chapel Hill

Fifty years ago today, Howard Lee was elected the first African American mayor of the town of Chapel Hill. There hadn't been an African American mayor of a predominately white Southern city since Reconstruction.

Poverty, Poor People's Campaign, Mass Incarceration
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The North Carolina Poor People’s Campaign is wrapping up its statewide bus tour today in Raleigh. They plan on joining school teachers for the May 1 demonstration.

NCCU, HBCU, Confederate Monument, North Carolina Central University
Leoneda Inge

North Carolina Central University officially unveiled the new name of its administration building Wednesday. The name of former North Carolina governor, Clyde Hoey, a known segregationist, is no longer on the building at the historically black institution.

Courtesy Dreamville Festival

Some 40,000 people are expected to gather in Raleigh on Saturday for the chance to inhabit a one-of-a-kind music and cultural world – Dreamville.

Juana Luz Tobar Ortega stands outside St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Greensboro, where she is living in sanctuary.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Nearly 100 documentary films from around the world will be shown this week and weekend in downtown Durham. It’s the 22nd annual Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, with this edition highlighting the stories of laid off autoworkers, the last male northern white rhino and musical greats like Miles Davis. But there are a small group of documentaries I have especially been waiting for.

NCCU freshman T'ona McBride attends her university's "Passport Caravan" and talks about why she wants to study abroad. NCCU junior Christian Allison, left.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

This is the season when many college students are preparing to study abroad for the summer. But numbers show the percentage of African American students taking advantage of these educational trips remains low.

N.C. Central University in Durham is working to change that.

Taraji P. Henson on red carpet in Durham.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

In 1970s Durham, N.C., two of the most unlikely people became what we would call today – “frenemies.” The relationship between a Ku Klux Klan leader and a civil rights activist would go down in history and is now on the big screen.

NCCU, Quiz Bowl, HBCU, Honda Campus All Star Challenge
Leoneda Inge

For 30 years, Historically Black Colleges and Universities have gone head-to-head in a special competition to prove who can answer tough questions quick and hit buzzers fast.

Leoneda Inge / WUNC

You may have heard of the four college students in Greensboro, North Carolina who sat at a segregated lunch counter at a Woolworth's and helped spark the Civil Rights Movement in 1960. Thursday in Chapel Hill, community and town officials are celebrating the Chapel Hill Nine – nine high school students who also sat down, to stand up.

Sickle Cell Disease, Public Health
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Editor's Note: WUNC Race and Southern Culture Reporter Leoneda Inge shares a personal account of her son, Teemer Barry, and his journey navigating sickle cell disease during his first year of college.

Sickle cell disease afflicts about 100,000 people in the United States, many of them African Americans. It is an inherited blood disorder that can cause frequent infections and chronic pain.

Census 2020, Census, Carolina Demography, NC Counts Coalition
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Preparations for the 2020 Census are underway in North Carolina, one of the fastest growing states in the nation poised to get another congressional seat after the decennial count.

St. Augustine's University, HBCU
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

After leading the historically black school for five years, Saint Augustine’s University President Everett B. Ward has announced he plans to retire.

Lennon Lacy, Bladenboro, NC NAACP, Hanging
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The tragic story of a black teenager from North Carolina will be featured during this year’s Sundance Film Festival in Utah. It's called “Always in Season.”

St. Augustine's University, HBCU, Higher Education
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Saint Augustine’s University in Raleigh reports raising a record amount of money for the school at the end of 2018. University officials say much of the support had to do with the effort by the small, historically black institution to regain full accreditation. But the news comes at a time when another HBCU in the state is struggling to meet fundraising goals.

EPA, Volunteer, Government shutdown
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The partial government shutdown is in its third week. While thousands of furloughed federal workers are affected in North Carolina, some from the Environmental Protection Agency are keeping busy as volunteers.

Pages