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The Cape Fear river continued to rise due to rainfall Hurricane Florence
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Exhaustion and frustration are building in the Carolinas as thousands of people wait to go home days after Hurricane Florence unleashed epic floods blamed for nearly three dozen deaths, including two women who drowned when a sheriff's van taking them to a mental health facility was swept off a road.

Scotland High School in Laurinburg, North Carolina flooded as rivers rose from Hurricane Florence's massive rainfall. A tributary to the Leith Creek runs across the school's property.
Courtesy of Scotland County Schools

Schools across the southeastern part of the state remained closed this week as administrators begin to assess the damage from Hurricane Florence.

Residents of an apartment complex in Fayetteville, look at a flooded car in a parking lot on Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

As flooding continues in the Carolinas after Hurricane Florence's massive rainfall, experts say high water will damage thousands of vehicles.

The North Carolina National Guard was deployed to help in the fight against Florence.
NC National Guard

North Carolina is still reeling from Hurricane Florence. The death toll from the storm rose to at least 37 people in three different states Tuesday, with 27 fatalities in North Carolina. There are roughly 10,000 people still in shelters. Governor Roy Cooper urged those who evacuated to stay put. 

a graphic of a film projector with film behind it
Creative Commons

In the mid-70s the president of Delta Sigma Theta sorority came up with a novel idea that could have changed the way Hollywood did business.

Donna Hodgins

The cases of around a dozen missing or murdered young black women in Rocky Mount scarcely made headlines when they occured in the early 2000s. City officials seemed more concerned with public perception than in finding the murderer and meting out justice. Meanwhile, the vagrant killer of a white woman in the same city was apprehended within the day.

President Donald Trump and North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, left, hand out food at Temple Baptist Church, where food and other supplies are being distributed during Hurricane Florence recovery efforts, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in New Bern
Evan Vucci / AP

Handing out hot dogs, hugs and comforting words, President Donald Trump sought Wednesday to soothe those who suffered losses in Hurricane Florence, declaring that "America grieves for you" as he surveyed damage the powerful storm left behind.

John Nemeth stands in front of a flooded road in the River Landing neighborhood of Wallace
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

The closest John Nemeth could get to his house was about 200 yards. He had to stand in a neighbor's yard and look across the fourth fairway of his community golf course just to see his house. But the fairway wasn't its normal lush green. Instead, all he could see was the glassy reflection of standing water.

Michael Thomas removes items from his Masonsonic Lodge as flood waters from the Cape Fear River rise following Hurricane Florence in Fayetteville, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

The Cape Fear River continues to rise in Fayetteville. While flood waters in downtown receded, other parts of the city are preparing for the river to crest.

Lisa Philip / WUNC

Though Hurricane Florence has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone, its floodwaters continue to wreak havoc on North Carolina communities. 

Garry Knight / Flickr Creative Commons

The wealth gap in the United States is growing – and it has negative consequences beyond the economy. A recent report from the Pew Research Center shows the American middle class continues to lose financial ground to the upper class. 

Courtesy of J.G. Hetherton / Crooked Lane Books

Laura Chambers did not want to come back to Hillsborough. But after the impulsive investigative journalist is fired from her job at the Boston Globe, she is forced to stumble home and take a gig at a small, hometown paper. After a missing girl turns up dead, Laura sees it as an opportunity to get back on the front page.

Neighbors in a small, unnamed neighborhood on the southern edge of Lumberton. came back to make a first check of their homes on Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. They
Jay Price / WUNC

It finally stopped raining in Robeson County on Monday. It will be days before the water drains away and the real cleanup can begin. But some evacuees took advantage of the break in the weather to venture back to their flooded neighborhoods to try to at least assess the damage.

Beatriz Jerlen Covarrubias-Rivera relaxes on a Red Cross cot with her four sons, ages 2 to 10, while staying at a shelter operated by the Red Cross at E.B. Aycock Middle School on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018.
Adam Jennings / American Red Cross

Governor Roy Cooper is reminding North Carolinians to find a safe place to stay as torrential rain and flooding continues to pummel parts of the state. For some, that safe place to stay may be another night at a shelter far away from home, like the UNC shelter in Chapel Hill.

6 Ways To Help Hurricane Florence Relief Efforts

Sep 17, 2018
People gather outside Knightdale High School, which has been converted to an evacuation shelter for those affected by Hurricane Florence in Kinghtdale, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Since Hurricane Florence made landfall on Friday, at least 14,000 people have sought refuge in more than 110 shelters across North Carolina. Governor Roy Cooper urged evacuees to stay in shelters and delay returning to their homes.

Linda Rupert

Tropical Depression Florence is well inland, but North Carolina is still reeling from the storm. All of the state’s 100 counties have experienced some form of National Weather System alert, from flash flood watch to hazardous weather outlook.

 In a two-hour special broadcast to stations around North Carolina, The State of Things speaks with residents, journalists, officials and experts about the devastating storm impact. 

John Howie Jr.'s new album is 'Not Tonight'
(John Howie Jr. photo by Kevin Clark)

Misery and heartbreak make a good country song. Multiply that weeping and twang by eleven and you get John Howie Jr.'s latest "Not Tonight". (The album features eleven cuts. Cuts might be the operative word here.)

"Not Tonight" is set for release on September 21, 2018.  You can get an exclusive preview of it here.

Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence inundate the town of Trenton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018.
Steve Helber / AP

Catastrophic flooding from Florence spread across the Carolinas this weekend, with roads to Wilmington cut off by the epic deluge and muddy river water swamping entire neighborhoods miles inland.

Emergency workers inspect a power line that was damaged by a tree uprooted by Hurricane Florence in Mount Olive, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Hurricane Florence has joined Fran, Floyd and Matthew as one of the worst storms to strike North Carolina. Several rivers continue to rise today, Wilmington is cut off from the rest of the state, and hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power. In other pockets of the state, people are returning home and recovery is underway.

Rising flood waters brought on by Hurricane Florence threaten a building off highway 70 in Goldsboro, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

With Wilmington cut off from the rest of North Carolina by still-rising floodwaters from Florence, officials plan to airlift food and water to the city of nearly 120,000 people as rescuers elsewhere pull inland residents from homes swamped by swollen rivers.

Albie Lewis (right), a FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer, talks with NC Governor Roy Cooper (left) aboard a Coast Guard C-130 aircraft after surveying the damage done by Hurricane Florence on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018.
Casey Toth / The News & Observer, Pool

Updated at 5:29 p.m.

Governor Roy Cooper toured storm damaged areas around the state Sunday and visited a shelter in Chapel Hill housing evacuees from Hurricane Florence.

Thea remains of Sutton Plant's two smokestacks stand over the demolished boiler and coal silos.
Duke Energy

Duke Energy said Saturday night that heavy rains from Florence caused a slope to collapse at a coal-ash landfill at a closed power station near the North Carolina coast.

 Rescue team member Sgt. Nick Muhar, from the North Carolina National Guard 1/120th battalion, evacuates a young child as the rising floodwaters from Hurricane Florence threatens his home in New Bern, N.C., on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Chris Seward / AP

An ominous tweet appeared on a historic North Carolina community's Twitter feed about 2 a.m. Friday.

It came as rivers swelled, tides crested and the rain wouldn't stop. And that's when people found themselves trapped in their homes as the water rose.

 An American flag lays on a table in the old town hall which sits damaged from Hurricane Matthew's flooding two years ago in Nichols, S.C., Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

The torrential rains from Florence will test South Carolina's infrastructure, which failed under historic flooding in 2015.

Russ Lewis covers his eyes from a gust of wind and a blast of sand as Hurricane Florence approaches Myrtle Beach, S.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

UPDATED 6 P.M.

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has confirmed additional deaths related to Hurricane Florrence.

Vehicles drive through water from the White Oak River flooding Highway 24 as Hurricane Florence hit Swansboro N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Tom Copeland / AP Photo

North Carolina is feeling the effects of Hurricane Florence. The major storm is expected to cause catastrophic flooding and long power outages. Host Frank Stasio talks to WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and WUNC politics reporter Rusty Jacobs for the latest from the governor and on state response.

Crews with the NYC Emergency Management perform water rescues in River Bend, N.C., after Hurricane Florence on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Courtesy of NYC Emergency Management

Updated at 4:45 p.m.

Florence has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but surges and flooding are expected to continue as it lashes South Carolina, according to the National Weather Service.

Sand bags surround homes on North Topsail Beach, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, as Hurricane Florence threatens the coast.
Chuck Burton / AP

Updated 5 p.m. | Sept. 13, 2018

Hurricane Florence's leading edge battered the Carolina coast Thursday, bending trees and shooting frothy sea water over streets on the Outer Banks, as the hulking storm closed in with 105 mph (165 kph) winds for a drenching siege that could last all weekend.

A picture of a patient and a doctor meeting over a web connection.
Cisco Systems

Dealing with a sick child or a minor ailment can be especially tough while waiting out a storm. UNC Healthcare has a solution for anyone in North Carolina who needs to consult a doctor for minor issues as Hurricane Florence hits the state.

AP Photo/Chuck Burton

Hurricane Florence, which is now a Category 2 storm, continues to bear down on the Carolina coast. The National Weather Service says it is likely to be “the storm of a lifetime” for certain portions of that coastline. Officials have ordered the evacuation of over 1 million people from the coasts of North and South Carolina. Scott Sharp, a senior forecaster with the National Weather Service in Raleigh speaks with host Frank Stasio with the latest report.

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