Music

The Archbishops of Blount Street

Oct 26, 2012

The Archbishops of Blount Street have brought the Jamaican sound of ska to North Carolina.

They are an eleven-piece band from all around the Triangle, and they’re launching a “Dreads to Kill” weekend tour in November where they will cover the music of Kiss. Bruce Wassel, Thomas Szypulski, Derek Brinson, George Shepard, Brannon Bolinger, Tim Smith, Richard Klecka and Jeremy Boomhower of the Archbishops talk with host Frank Stasio and play live in our studios.

Jo Gore made a name for herself around the Triangle by singing jazz and soul music. But she grew up singing traditional gospel songs in her grandparents’ church. Now she has a new album, “The Herstory of Josephine Gore: Return of the Articulate Kinsman, Volume One.” The band Jo Gore and the Alternative will join host Frank Stasio to revisit old gospel songs and to play some more contemporary music.

Durham's Delta Rae
deltarae.com

It's not just politicians speaking at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this week. Organizers have lined up a range of musicians to help keep attendees entertained and fired up. Tonight's performers include the Foo Fighters, Mary J Blige, Earth, Wind and Fire and James Taylor. But Taylor isn't the only North Carolinian playing tonight. Durham-based Delta Rae has toured with many bands since releasing its debut album Carry the Fire earlier this year.

Riley Baugus

Aug 24, 2012

Musician Riley Baugus has devoted his life's work to playing, making, and studying the banjo. Baugus’ new CD is called “Long Steel Rail.” He regales host Frank Stasio with old-time songs and stories from North Carolina.

Punk

Aug 8, 2012

The emergence of punk music marked an anarchic change in the sound of rock during the 1980s, and Billy Ingram was there to document its rise.

He was a writer for a gay publication covering the Los Angeles music scene, and he had a front-row seat to a revolution in rock. At the same time, Ingram was coming into his own as a gay man covering punk culture, which he found less-than-friendly toward homosexuals. Ingram joins host Frank Stasio to talk about his experiences as documented in new book, "Punk" (TVParty/2012).

James Olin Oden

Jul 27, 2012

The Ancient Celts told stories to each other through song. They had chants for battle and mourning dirges when their heroes fell. Raleigh-based musician James Olin Oden says the contemporary Celtic music scene is alive and well.

Songwriter Willie French Lowery is best remembered for penning Indian heritage anthems like “Proud to be a Lumbee” and writing the original music for “Strike at the Wind,” an annual outdoor drama that honors a Lumbee cultural hero.  Lowery was also a successful rock musician, educator, activist and Robeson County community leader before he passed away in May at the age of 67.

Fresh off of an international tour with Grammy-nominated duo The Foreign Exchange, vocalist Jeanne Jolly is hard at work on her full-length solo debut. The Raleigh native draws inspiration for her songs from the country music classics she grew up listening to, her hometown roots and the grief she’s experienced over losing her mother to cancer.

Big Bang Boom!

Jun 22, 2012

Chuck Folds, Steve Willard and Eddie Walker had been playing in rock bands all over the Triad when they formed Big Bang Boom, a band that makes family music. The decision was organic; they were dads and wanted to make some music their kids and their wives could love.

Vince Gill
Durham Performing Arts Center

Country legend Vince Gill plays the Durham Performing Arts Center this Sunday night. After nearly 20 records, 14 Grammys and a truckload of Country Music Association Awards, he's back playing bluegrass again. And Gill tells WUNC's Eric Hodge it feels right to be doing it in North Carolina.

Db's
Credit www.bar-none.com

The dB's are back. This week, the legendary band releases Falling off the Sky. It's their first studio album in more than 30 years. The dBs began life in the late 70s in New York after growing up in Winston Salem. After several critically acclaimed records, members of the band went their separate ways -- but the music they recorded continued to influence fellow musicians.

Doc Watson
Sugar Hill Records

Musician Doc Watson died on Tuesday. The 89 year old guitarist from Deep Gap, North Carolina, had been in a Winston-Salem hospital recovering from a fall and other ailments. Watson was an iconic North Carolina musician, he broke new ground in bluegrass, country and gospel. His legacy has fueled a generation of musicians.

Doc Watson: In the summer of 1934, papa made my first musical instrument, a little five string fretless banjo and he played me a tune on it.

Bull City Soul Revival

Apr 19, 2012

Long before Durham, NC boasted a vibrant indie music scene, the Bull City was home to a thriving soul music community. In the 1960s and 1970s, Durham musicians combined blues, R&B, and gospel styles to help create and foster a unique new sound. Bull City Soul Revival is a collaborative effort of musicians, scholars, and Durhamites to stage a comeback of soul music.

The Legacy of Joe Thompson

Apr 5, 2012
picture of fiddler Joe Thompson
http://www.ncarts.org/artist_page.cfm?ser=1255&num=755&

Joe Thompson was a legendary fiddler, teacher and cultural icon. He passed away earlier this year after bringing new life to old-time string band music for many decades.

When Stephen Jaffe was a child, his parents forbade him and his siblings from pursuing a career in music. Now all three are professional musicians, and Jaffe is being inducted in the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Make Your Own Danger

Sep 29, 2011
Alina Simone
www.alinasimone.com

The life of indie musician Alina Simone has been anything but ordinary. After releasing an album sung entirely in Russian and attending a male strip show in Siberia, she is now breaking new territory as an author. Simone’s debut book, “You Must Go and Win,” is a collection of essays that chronicles her bizarre adventures through the music world. She’s also released a new CD called “Make Your Own Danger,” which was influenced by her time in North Carolina.

Beyonce is up at the top of the pop music charts this summer. The fact that she's in the top 10 again is no surprise, but what is surprising is that a record from Bon Iver is near the top of the charts. The band is the latest project by former Raleigh resident Justin Vernon. He's coming back to the Triangle next week to play the Raleigh Amphitheater.

Raleigh will host a benefit concert for tornado victims. The city hopes to raise money to give to charities, including the Salvation Army and the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle.  

The “Rise Up Raleigh concert” will include 11 bands and take place at the Downtown Raleigh Amphitheater - just 200 yards north of a spot where one of the tornadoes touched down.

Humble Tripe

Apr 22, 2011

Durham-based band Humble Tripe is the musical project of Shawn Luby. After years spent playing classical guitar in competitions, Luby retired from the world of music at the age of 20. He moved from Kansas to North Carolina, working first at a nonprofit, then as a clinical lab scientist. Once he entered his 30s, his desire to play music returned and he formed Humble Tripe with his friends.

Just about every bluegrass musician has been directly or indirectly influenced by Wade Mainer. Mainer, a master of the banjo, taught himself to play his instrument of choice as a child and developed an innovative two-finger picking style. That style, combined with Mainer’s strong vocals earned him popularity as a performer and recording artist in the 1930s and 1940s.

Robert Plant
robertplant.com

A rock n' roll legend, former lead singer of Led Zeppelin Robert Plant has stayed busy as of late. His latest release is called "Band of Joy" and his current tour brought him through Raleigh recently. WUNC's Eric Hodge sat down with Plant to talk about the new album. Click "Listen Now" to hear the interview.

Abigail Washburn
abigailwashburn.com

Singer, songwriter, and banjo player Abigail Washburn is out with a new solo album called "City of Refuge." She plays at Berkeley Cafe in Raleigh tomorrow tonight and will be on A Prairie Home Companion on Saturday.

WUNC Morning Edition host Eric Hodge talks with Back Porch Music hosts Freddy Jenkins and Keith Weston about some memorable music events of 2010.  Inspired by NPR's year-end music series.

Justin Townes Earle
myspace.com/justintownesearle

Singer-songwriter Justin Townes Earle has forged a sound that harkens back to another era. His albums are crisp and his live performances inspired. The latest album, "Harlem River Blues" is something of a love letter to New York City. WUNC's Eric Hodge sat down with Justin Townes Earle before he played Cat's Cradle Monday, December 13th, 2010.

Chaka Khan! Chaka Khan! It’s a name that just rolls off your tongue.  The famous R & B and “funk” superstar has a voice that has mesmerized fans for decades with its range and flexibility.  And who can forget the feathers and the hair!   Chaka Khan takes the stage in Durham this weekend.

Don de Leaumont Plays Live In Studio

Nov 20, 2009
Don de Leaumont
dononthewb.com

Singer-songwriter Don de Leaumont’s music is part storytelling, part folksy warmth and insight. In October, he released his fifth solo album, called “Planes, Trains, Crickets and Central Air.” Now a resident of Atlanta, Georgia, Don returns to his longtime home of Chapel Hill for a gig at The Cave.

He joins host Frank Stasio in the studio to play some tunes and discuss how he broke his heavy metal addiction.

Picture of Russian Duo: Terry Boyarsky & Oleg Kruglyakov
russianduo.com

The balalaika is a traditional Russian instrument with three strings and a triangular body. Oleg Kruglyakov, a native of Omsk City, Siberia, has been playing the balalaika since he was seven years old. Now, he's devoted to educating other cultures about Russian folk music and testing the limits of his instrument by teaming up with pianist Terry Boyarsky.

Joe Thompson At 90

Dec 9, 2008
David Persoff

Legendary North Carolina fiddler Joe Thompson turns 90-years-old today. He is widely recognized as being the last living link to a time when African American String Bands played for square dances nearly every weekend around here. Thompson's toured the world with his music and is still playing, but now mostly, at home with friends and neighbors.

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