Eric Hodge

Host, "Morning Edition"

Eric Hodge hosts WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and files reports for the North Carolina news segments of the broadcast. He started at the station in 2004 doing fill-in work on weekends and All Things Considered.

In August 2004, he took over the Morning Edition slot where he enjoys the challenge of bringing North Carolina news to listeners each weekday. Eric moved to Carrboro from New York City in 2000. He worked for the BBC and XFM radio while living in London, England. He has also run his own music marketing company, worked for major record labels in both New York and London, and worked on the Grammy Award nominated Harry Belafonte project, "The Anthology of Black Music."

Eric grew up in Michigan, trained at the Broadcast Center in St. Louis with CBS's KMOX radio and worked at a variety of stations in the Midwest and upstate New York.

Ways to Connect

An image of John D. Loudermilk
UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. On this week's episode Rick Miller from the legendary Chapel Hill band Southern Culture On The Skids talks with Eric Hodge about John D. Loudermilk's 'Tobacco Road,' and the many, many times it has been covered. Be sure to stick around after the interview for a live version of Southern Culture on the Skids covering the song.

An image of Randy Newman
Gijsbert Hanekroot / Getty Images

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. On this week's episode Libby Rodenbough of the Chapel Hill band Mipso talks with Eric Hodge abour Randy Newman's 'The Great Debate.'

An image of Sara Romweber
Mike Benson

Today we have a special episode of Come Hear NC on the Songs We Love podcast.

Sensational Nightingales album cover
ABC Records

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. This week Phil Cook talks with Eric Hodge about The Sensational Nightingales classic gospel song 'My Sisters And Brothers.'

An image of Carolina Chocolate Drops
Julie Roberts

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. On this week's episode Music Maker Relief Foundation co-founder Tim Duffy talks with Eric Hodge about 'Cornbread And Butterbeans' from the Grammy Award winning album Genuine Negro Jig by The Carolina Chocolate Drops.

A photo of Maya De Vitry.
Laura Partain

After spending several years collaborating with her band mates in The Stray Birds, singer-songwriter Maya de Vitry set out to find a different voice. What transpired were a lot of walks in the woods, traveling to meet friends old and new and mustering the confidence to sing her own songs in her own voice. The result is Adaptations

Tift Merritt
Alexandra Valenti / Sacks & Co.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery station, WUNC Music.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery station, WUNC Music.

A picture of Mountain Man.
Elizabeth Weinberg

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

On this episode Eric Hodge chats with the North Carolina based folk trio Mountain Man about their song 'Rang Tang Ring Toon' from their 2018 album 'Magic Ship.'

The song is a playful romp that the band says came about organically. It's gone on to become one of their favorites to perform live.

Listen to the episode here:

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

A picture of Chris Stamey playing guitar.
Gardner Campbell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gardnercampbell/8554646232/

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

There was a time in our history when families gathered around the radio to listen to stories and music. WUNC produced a show from a couple years back that tries to rekindle that spirit. It's called 'Occasional Shivers' and was written by Chris Stamey. On this episode of the podcast we focus on the song that inspired the show.

A picture of Greg Hawks.
York Wilson Photography

Greg Hawks says his new record is a culmination of all of his musical influences. That means the songs on I Think It's Time contain nods to classic country, 1970s pop/rock, rhythmic soul and his roots in the American South.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

On this special episode, we take a look at the legacy of Big Star and focus on the 2017 tribute album Thank You, Friends: Big Star's Third Live...And More.

A picture of Michael Rank
Bowie Ryder / michaelrankmusic.com

Michael Rank is doubling down on his musical move to funk and soul. The Triangle-based singer/songwriter was known for his Stones-y, outlaw country swagger and dusty folk on a series of recordings before pivoting to Sly and The Family Stone and D'Angelo on last year's Another Love.

Photo of Amy Ray
Carrie Schrader

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

This time we take a look at Amy Ray's 'Didn't Know A Damn Thing,' from her latest solo album Holler. The song starts off like a country song complete with banjo, pedal steel and two-step back beat. But as the lyrics build, out comes a story about a white kid growing up in the Jim Crow South.

Listen to the episode here:

A picture of singer-songwriter Doug Paisley.
LP Photographs

Doug Paisley's new record Starter Home is a quiet beauty. The Canadian musician will remind you of Guy Clark, John Prine and Gordon Lightfoot, even as he puts his own stamp on a long tradition of singer-songwriters.

He recorded the new songs over a few years at several home studios in Toronto. Paisley will be at The Cat's Cradle Back Room in Carrboro tonight. 

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

On this episode we're featuring 'He's A Lone Ranger' by Dom Flemons. It's a song off of his latest record Black Cowboys.

The record redefines the image of the American Cowboy with songs like the one featured here. It's one Dom wrote after hearing the story of Bass Reeves, who was born into slavery in 1838.

An image of the band Superchunk
Lissa Gotwals

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

This time we take a look at 'What A Time To Be Alive,' the title track from Superchunk's latest album.

The song, and the album of the same name, is a call to action. According to singer Mac McCaughan it was written in reaction to the current political climate.

Listen to the episode here:

A picture of Mountain Man.
Elizabeth Weinberg

The wait is over, and your patience is being rewarded. Mountain Man has released Magic Ship,  a new album of sparse and dreamy new Appalachian-inspired folk songs.  Amelia Meath (Sylvan Esso), Molly Sarle, and Alexandra Sauser-Monnig (ASM) have been busy with their other bands and with solo recordings since Mountain Man's debut Made the Harbor was released eight years ago. 

Photo of Amy Ray
Carrie Schrader

Singer-songwriter Amy Ray is bringing her new album Holler to Durham next week.

A picture of The War and Treaty
David McClister

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

A picture of The Felice Brothers
The Felice Brothers

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

This time, we're talking with The Felice Brothers about 'Plunder,' a song off of their 2016 album 'Life In The Dark.'

The song has all the qualities of a great Felice Brothers tune, catchy guitar riffs and quirky lyrics. 

Listen to the episode here:

Criminal: 100 Episodes!

Oct 5, 2018
Criminal 100th Episode graphic
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Criminal podcast host Phobe Judge and WUNC's Eric Hodge looked back at 100 episodes and three years of Criminal, the podcast produced at WUNC, during Morning Edition.

The 100th episode of Criminal starts with the strange case of D.B. Cooper and picks up with a crime inspired by the man who disappeared by jumping from an inflight plane.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State legislators will return to Raleigh Tuesday to come up with more money for people and areas affected by Hurricane Florence.

Britt Snuzz Uzzell
Gabby Bulgarelli for WUNC Music

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time around we're talking about the song "Fayetteville."  The city has had a rough week.  The Cape Fear River crested at near record levels, flooding streets and neighborhoods and forcing people out of their homes.

Many have left town for higher ground, but if they're anything like songwriter Britt Uzzell they'll be back.

John Howie Jr. 'Not Tonight'
Kevin Clark

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

On this episode, Eric Hodge talks with John Howie Jr. about his first solo record 'Not Tonight.'

The album is full of songs of heartbreak and resilience delivered in Howie's distinctive baritone. He talks about how the album came to be, and what inspired him to record this one as a solo artist.

Listen to the episode here:

A picture of Stuart McLamb of The Love Language.
Marci Hohner / Merge Records

Stuart McLamb had to make a big move to complete his new album under the moniker The Love Language. Baby Grand got its start in a warehouse in Virginia, but it was McLamb's move to the west coast that prompted a creative surge that completed the collection.  Each song inhabits its own universe and stands alone, but it also holds together as an expression of McLamb's creative vision.

A picture of Amanda Shires.
Elizaveta Porodina / All Eyes Media

The surprisingly hard rocking song "Eve's Daughter" is just one of the stand-out singles on Amanda Shires' new record To The Sunset. The singer-songwriter and fiddler wrote her fifth collection of songs while sharing child-care duties with her partner Jason Isbell.

The Be Loud Sophie Foundation will host its 5th anniversary show at the Cat's Cradle this weekend.  

The annual event raises money to benefit adolescent and young adult cancer patients at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill. The foundation honors the memory of Sophie Steiner, a Chapel Hill teenager who died of cancer in 2013. It was founded by her parents Lucy and Niklaus Steiner.

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