Hyde County

black and white photo of protesters holding signs
From the Raleigh News and Observer Negative Collection/Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina / bit.ly/2Qsjbm2

Coastal Hyde County is the site of one of the longest and most successful civil rights protests in American history. In 1968 the African American community boycotted Hyde County schools in response to the county’s desegregation plan.

File photo of a smiling alligator.
Photo Kent / Flickr - Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/bBxRbp

For the first time in decades, some hunters will get the chance to harvest an alligator in select parts of Hyde County this fall. Alligators are federally listed as a threatened species, because of their similar appearance to the American Crocodile, prized for its skin.

Corn Damage
Brian Long

The path that Hurricane Arthur took last week hit an area of the state where a lot of corn is grown.  And several farmers will be affected.

State Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler and staff traveled by Forest Service plane to see the crop damage first hand.  Ag spokesman Brian Long says a lot of the damage was in Hyde County, known for growing corn.

“There are parts of Hyde County where you can just look and you would almost think you were somewhere in the Midwest, because it’s just is corn, and corn, and corn," said Long.

Inside of an ambulance
adesigna / Flickr Creative Commons

EMS officials in an eastern North Carolina county will have to expand their services as another rural hospital shuts down. 

The Vidant Pungo Hospital in the town of Belhaven will be closed by next spring.  The facility is in Beaufort County, but it's the closest hospital for residents of neighboring Hyde County, which has about 6,000 people. 

Hyde County EMS director Justin Gibbs says the next closest facilities with emergency services are about 30 miles farther away.

"We're going to have to look at rewriting our system plan," Gibbs says.

North Carolina is seeking to regulate emissions from a big egg-producing facility, using the Clean Water Act. Today the department of Environment and Natural Resources will be in Hyde County Superior Court, where Rose Acre Farms will argue the state can't use water regulations to control air emissions. At issue are pollutants being released through ventilation fans in Rose Acre's hen houses, which contain more than 3 million chickens.