Black Lives Matter

A Confederate flag flys outside of Darlington speedway in 2015.
Terry Renna / AP

The familiar scene of Confederate flags waved by fans at NASCAR tracks could soon be a relic of racing's good ol' boy roots.

A man hold a sign at a protest in downtown Raleigh on May 30, 2020 to protest the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis earlier in the week.
Peyton Sickles / For WUNC

The city of Raleigh lifted its curfew and state of emergency on Monday, a week after it was imposed on residents.

A referee holds a basketball during an N.C. State women's basketball game at Reynolds Coliseum in 2020.
Mitchell Northam / WUNC

Several professional and college sports teams in North Carolina are ending their partnerships with CPI Security, a home security company based in Charlotte, after the firm’s CEO told an activist that people should focus on “black-on-black crime” rather than the protests against police brutality following the death of George Floyd.

Victor Lytvinenko, via Instagram / https://bit.ly/3f0G8I0

Add North Carolina's capital city to those sporting a bold message denouncing racism painted in large yellow letters on a city street.

Image of Asheville police car
Osajus / Flickr Creative Commons

The police chief in Asheville has apologized for the destruction of a medic station that was set up for people protesting police brutality and the death of George Floyd.

A crowd gathers in downtown Raleigh on Tuesday night to protest the death of George Floyd and violence against black Americans.
Kate Medley / For WUNC

Daily protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis have spread across North Carolina. While the message of these demonstrations is slightly different in each city, there has been a broad call for overhauling the way police officers do their jobs.

Protesters and police in riot gear face off at demonstrations on Sunday night in Raleigh.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Images and video from Saturday and Sunday nights in Raleigh have ricocheted across the internet. Cameras captured heavily armored police and sheriff’s deputies pushing protesters with sticks, the air thick with tear gas. On Sunday, Raleigh Mayor Mary Ann Baldwin criticized the rioting and looting that took place.

People gathered outside CMPD headquarters in uptown Charlotte on May 30 to protest. (WFAE)
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The police department in North Carolina's largest city is coming under criticism after a video posted to social media appeared to show officers using chemical agents on demonstrators who were boxed in while protesting the death of George Floyd.

(Thursday 10:00 p.m.) - Thursday night’s vigil in Pack Square went off peacefully, with protesters leaving as organizers urged before the 8 p.m. curfew went into effect.  

A large group of protesters kneeling in the street in downtown Greensboro.
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Cities across the Triangle and Triad witnessed a night of peaceful demonstrations, more than a week after the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis.

In the past week, protests have taken place throughout North Carolina, and across the country, in response to the death of George Floyd. Floyd, who was born in North Carolina, was killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis last week. In a video, Floyd can be heard saying “I can’t breathe” while the officer held his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes.

The ongoing protests are also fueled by historic and longstanding violence and institutional inequalities perpetrated against black Americans- inequalities that have been illuminated by the pandemic’s death toll.

We talk with William Darity, director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center for Social Equity at Duke University, and the co-author of the new book “From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century.” We also hear from Brianna Baker, a public health analyst with RTI International, about attending a protest in Raleigh on Saturday and why she feels an urgency to organize despite a pandemic.


Melissa Sue Gerrits / Carolina Public Press, via AP

Police officers in Fayetteville took a knee in solidarity with protesters Monday, two days after the city had experienced violence and looting.

Police in riot gear protect the old state capitol building in Raleigh, N.C., on Sunday, May 31, 2020.
Allen G. Breed / AP

Updated at 4:17 p.m. on 6/1/2020.

North Carolina’s capital city is enacting a curfew starting Monday night, after two nights of protests sparked by the latest killing of a black man by police led to street fires, store break-ins, and fireworks being thrown at officers.

Volunteers work to clean up and repair damage in downtown Raleigh, N.C., after a night of angry clashes between police and protestors left much of Downtown Raleigh damaged on Sunday, May 31, 2020.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Protests broke out in several North Carolina cities over the weekend. Almost all of them began peacefully, but as darkness descended each night, violent confrontations and looting took place in Fayetteville, Charlotte, and Raleigh. It was particularly damaging in the state capitol, where protestors damaged almost every storefront on Fayetteville Street.

Raleigh city and police officials held a press conference Sunday morning to discuss unrest in the city Saturday night.
Jason de Bruyn / WUNC

Gov. Roy Cooper is scheduled to hold a news briefing to discuss last night's unrest in cities across the state in response to the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Watch live here starting at 4 p.m.:

At a press conference Sunday, Raleigh Mayor Mary-Ann Baldwin said there were two protests Saturday night: one peaceful, the other violent. She said to the second group: "You are not Raleigh."
Jason de Bruyn / WUNC

North Carolina's capital city is cleaning up after a night of protests in response to the death of George Floyd led to what the city's police chief described as "anarchy."

An image from Bright's series '#1960Now' that explores the parallels between the Civil Rights Movement and the current  #BlackLivesMatter movement today.
Sheila Pree Bright

Photographer Sheila Pree Bright first picked up a camera in search of a means of personal expression. After her first public exhibit, it was clear that not only did she have a gift for making beautiful images, but her work also sparked thoughtful and unexpected conversations about race, politics, and justice. Bright first came into the national spotlight with the series “Suburbia,” which explored black suburban life in Atlanta.

Colette Heiser

CJ Suitt is a young black poet living in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. And he has a simple and frightening question, "Would I be shot if I called the police?"

CJ uses his poetry to combat stereotypes and to build bridges of understanding. But he admits, in the wake of yet another series of high profile killings of black men by the police, something has changed. CJ no longer feels safe walking at night.

Bettie Murchison
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

About 100 people gathered in downtown Raleigh Thursday evening to mark a "Black Lives Matter National Day of Action."

In Durham, another seven people chained themselves to a railing outside the Durham Police Department to protest the recent shooting deaths of African American men by police.

The protests were among several demonstration across the country in the weeks after recent shootings by police of black men in Minnesota and Louisiana.

Protestors said they wanted to bring attention to local issues related to police accountability, according to Rukiya Dillahunt.

Pages