Dave DeWitt

Feature News Editor/ Host, "Tested" Podcast

Dave DeWitt is WUNC's Feature News Editor. As an editor, reporter, and producer he's covered politics, environment, education, sports, and a wide range of other topics.

He has filed stories for NPR’s news magazines as well as Marketplace and Only A Game. He formerly worked in college athletics, college admissions, and with the Tar Heel Sports Network. In 2001, he wrote the non-fiction book "True Blue".

 

Ways to Connect

Stress

3 hours ago

We all have a role to play in this pandemic. For the majority of us, it's to stay home, stay away from others, and do our best to manage our lives through the next few weeks of social distancing.

For some, unanswered questions are a cause of stress, but for others, the stress is more acute and focused - people who have loved ones who are sick, or those fighting the disease on the front lines, in hospitals across North Carolina.

We talk today with Shevaun Neupert. She's a professor of psychology at N.C. State University and researches stress. Neupert explains the difference between regular, everyday stress, and the chronic variety we are feeling now.


Models

Apr 1, 2020

It's hard to know what, exactly, to expect here. Is North Carolina going to be like New York? Or New Orleans? Will we see our hospitals overrun?

Or might we get to where the Bay Area is? Early and decisive actions seem to have made a difference there. As of now, hospitals in northern California are not overrun, and the curve there might just be flattening.

Today on Tested, we talk to Rose Hoban from North Carolina Health News about which states might serve as a bellwether for what North Carolina can expect, and she shines a light on some of the unsung heroes of the health care community.


Teaching And Learning

Mar 31, 2020

These are unprecedented times for school administrators, educators, students, and parents.

For so many, school is not just where classes take place, it's the primary social gathering place. And some things, like proms and graduations, will be lost forever.

On today's episode of Tested, we talk to WUNC's two education reporters, Cole del Charco and Liz Schlemmer, about the seismic shift at all levels of North Carolina's education system.


Numbers

Mar 30, 2020

On CNN over the weekend, Dr. Anthony Fauci brought up some frightening numbers, including that the country can expect 100,000-200,000 deaths due to COVID-19. Proportionally, that would mean between 3,000-6,000 people would die in North Carolina.

But right now, the most important number here is hospitalizations. DHHS puts that number at 137 currently, and it's very likely to go up. Way up.

We talk with Rose Hoban, the editor and founder of North Carolina Health News, about what numbers to watch, as well as the potential for a "bomb of infection" waiting to go off in the state's prisons and jails.


We're Number One

Mar 27, 2020

The United States has overtaken China, Italy, and every other country in the world in the number of documented COVID-19 cases. It's a dubious and troubling honor, to be sure. And it caps a week unlike any before it, around the globe and here in North Carolina.

On a day when Governor Roy Cooper issues a statewide stay-at-home order, host Dave DeWitt speaks Rose Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News, about how we will know when the curve is starting to flatten in the state.


Treatment

Mar 26, 2020

Today: Treatment.

Duke University Hospital has announced it is part of the first national study of a drug the World Health Organization has called "the only drug right now that we think may have real efficacy" to treat COVID-19.

That drug is Remdesivir. It was first developed at UNC-Chapel Hill's Gillings School of Global Public Health.

WUNC reporter Jay Price speaks to Dr. Cameron Wolfe, associate professor of medicine at Duke University and the lead investigator in the new study, about the Remdesivir trial and its prospects for treating COVID-19.


Home

Mar 25, 2020

Today: Home.

Earlier today, Durham Mayor Steve Schewel issued a stay-at-home order for his city. A flurry of other counties and cities have issued similar orders in the past 24 hours.

But areas of our state are not being affected by Covid-19 in equal amounts. More than three dozen counties have no reported cases at all. So should the same rules apply to all of them?

We talk about that and more with Rose Hoban, the editor of North Carolina Health News.


Crashing

Mar 24, 2020

Today: Crashing.

We are now in week two of social distancing, and the economy is in free fall. That has the president and others wavering on the measures that medical personnel say will save lives. That dispute, between the illness and the pain caused by the remedy, is real, but it affects people unevenly.

We speak with WUNC reporter Jason deBruyn about unemployment and the short-term future of the North Carolina economy, and we offer an appreciation for the doctor leading the UNC System.


Decisions

Mar 23, 2020

Today: Decisions.

The number of personal decisions we are making every day has probably shrunk. We're driving less, not packing our kids' lunches, and eating out less. But the decisions we are making have likely taken on a whole lot more significance.

On this episode of Tested, we look at the current decisions being made by state leaders like Governor Roy Cooper and the past choices made by the General Assembly, and what impact those policies might be having on how the coronavirus pandemic is playing out in North Carolina.


Meet host Dave DeWitt on a quick guided tour of what to expect from WUNC's first-ever daily podcast.


N.C. Public Radio and N.C. Health News formed a partnership to provide updates on the spread of coronavirus and COVID-19 in North Carolina.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

As the number of coronavirus cases climbs, hospitals in North Carolina are preparing for the worst – and so are the doctors, nurses, and everyone else in the health care system.

WUNC's Dave DeWitt chats with Rose Hoban, founder of North Carolina Health News, about the strain being felt by hospitals and health care workers, as they prepare for a possible tsunami of COVID-19 patients.

N.C. Public Radio and N.C. Health News formed a partnership to provide updates on the spread of coronavirus and COVID-19 in North Carolina.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Coronavirus testing is ramping up in North Carolina and across the country. But it still lags behind almost every other developed country in the world.

Thousands of tests are still in the pipeline here in the state. That number will jump considerably, as local health departments, doctor offices, academic medical centers and others ramp up their own testing sites.

Baric Lab
UNC-Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health / UNC-CH

Labs across the world are scrambling to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. But just as important is a more immediate treatment. The treatment the World Health Organization has classified as the most promising is coming out of a lab at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

A mostly unoccupied meeting room. The full UNC Board of Governors, and committees, met on the telephone on Dec. 12 and 13.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

At the very end of the Friday, Nov. 15th UNC Board of Governors meeting, Chairman Randy Ramsey made the kind of logistical announcement almost no one notices.

Philip Howard sits in his house which was built in 1865 and which he renovated to historic standards in 2005.
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

Philip Howard is sitting in the living room of his 1860s-era Ocracoke house, tucked along a street that bears his family name.

Under his feet is a massive Oriental rug that once belonged to his mother. She worked long hours to save up for it. When Hurricane Dorian hit four weeks ago and the water rose, it looked like the rug was a goner.

Atlantic Coast Conference / ESPN

Millions of sports fans might not be able to get the ACC Network when it launches next month.

The Atlantic Coast Conference and ESPN have partnered to create the TV network to broadcast and promote conference sporting events. But only a few carriers have signed on.

Duke Energy
Duke Energy

A Duke University researcher says that Sutton Lake, near Wilmington, has been the site of numerous coal ash spills, both before and after Hurricane Florence.

Mapleview Farm, Orange County
Elizabeth Friend / WUNC

Multiple storms struck more than a half dozen counties in the central part of the state Friday, causing damage to hundreds of houses and commercial structures, but causing no deaths or serious injuries.

Nick Knittel

Durham police and fire officials confirmed one fatality from a gas explosion in downtown Durham that destroyed one building and severely damaged four others.

Mike Spencer / AP Photo

Updated April 2 at 4:25 p.m.

The Chair of the North Carolina Republican Party Robin Hayes has been indicted on charges including bribery. Durham businessman and the state’s largest political donor Greg Lindberg, along with two of his associates: John Gray and John Palermo Jr. were also indicted.

East Carolina University Chancellor Cecil Staton.
East Carolina University

The list of leaders who are departing the university system in North Carolina is growing. East Carolina University Chancellor Cecil Staton announced this morning that he will resign his position.

A sign in support of the Silent Sam statue rests near the monument on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 as hundreds of protesters gathered in opposition of the statue.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

The board governing North Carolina's public universities is giving itself more time to decide the fate of a Confederate statue toppled by protesters.

Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Updated at 2:30 p.m.

Bennett College has lost its accreditation after the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools denied the school's appeal.

headshot of Josh Stein, NC flag in the background
Courtesy of NCDOJ

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein is calling on the state Legislature to allocate $6 million to test backlogged sexual assault evidence collection kits.

Stein is calling his request The Survivor Act.

A photo take on December 2, 2018 shows barricades surrounding the pedestal where the Silent Sam statue once stood.
Alex Kolyer / For WUNC

As Silent Sam – and its remnants – sit in an undisclosed location somewhere on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus, a small group of people are working behind the scenes to determine its future.

UNC Trustees
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Despite a second long, closed-door meeting in the span of a few days, the University of North Carolina Board of Trustees has yet to announce the selection of an interim chancellor.

A crane lays the final girder on the Bonner Bridge replacement project.
Jamison Padgett / PCL Construction

Dare County officials are seeking suggestions for a new name for the bridge that spans the Oregon Inlet.

The current bridge is named for Herbert C. Bonner, a U.S. Congressman from North Carolina who served from 1940 until 1965. Bonner was instrumental in getting the bridge project off the ground.

A photo take on December 2, 2018 shows barricades surrounding the pedestal where the Silent Sam statue once stood.
Alex Kolyer / For WUNC

Dozens of faculty and graduate students at UNC Chapel Hill are threatening to withhold student grades and exam scores. It’s part of a protest over the university’s proposal to build a new, $5.3 million facility to house the Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

William Keyes
Courtesy of UNC Chapel Hill

A current member of the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees is bringing a unique perspective to his deliberations on Silent Sam, the Confederate monument torn down by protesters in August. William Keyes once worked as a paid political operative for the government of South Africa during apartheid.

East Carolina University Chancellor Cecil Staton.
East Carolina University

The chancellor of East Carolina University has the full support of the school’s Board of Trustees. That’s according to the Board’s chair.

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