News

Valeria Watson

  The Appalachian region is an expansive stretch of hundreds of thousands of miles from the mountains of New York to Mississippi. It is home to more than 25 million people who celebrate diverse cultural traditions, yet its stereotype as a region filled with poor, white farmers still looms large. In the 90s, writer Frank X Walker coined the term “Affrilachia,” to chip away at those stereotypes and render visible the life and work of a more diverse array of residents.

Georgia O'Keeffe, NCMA, Female Artists
Permission granted NC Museum of Art

More than 35 of Georgia O’Keeffe’s works make up “The Beyond: Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art” exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art opening Saturday. O'Keeffe lived for nearly 100 years, and was one of the most iconic artists of the 20th century.

The band Natural Born Leaders
Courtesy of Natural Born Leaders

The band Natural Born Leaders describes its sound as “the Fugees meets Black Sabbath.” The Asheville-based group is comprised of five members whose musical styles and influences range from metal and hard rock to hip-hop and folk.

Dante High Debuts With Abundant Hooks

12 hours ago
Brian Livingston

Ari Picker's first band Lost In The Trees was known for cinematic, orchestral folk music that incorporated many layers of instrumentation including strings and horns. It was beautiful, complex and artful. His new project is more direct and takes its lead from keyboard synths, guitar and a driving rhythm section. Dante High's debut is eight tightly performed, taut songs that clock in at just 30 minutes.

Gretchen Engel, executive director of the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, sits in her Durham office and looks through mandalas and other pictures colored by death row inmate James Davis.
Rebecca Martinez / WUNC

At the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, the filing cabinets in the corner office are adorned with pictures of vibrant mandalas. The intricate geometric patterns were colored in by James Davis. The artist received a Purple Heart for his service during the Vietnam War. Davis reportedly suffers from PTSD and other mental illness. In 1995, Davis murdered three people, and has been on death row ever since. He's an old man now.

Credit: NASA

Asheville may be tucked away in the mountains, but it is quickly building a reputation as “climate city,” a home for researchers, scientific entrepreneurs and nonprofit and governmental organizations working to address climate change.

File photo of UNC Board of Governors Chairman Harry Smith and UNC system President Margaret Spellings responding to questions about the aborted Western Carolina University chancellor search at a July 27, 2018 press conference.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

The UNC Board of Governors, which oversees North Carolina's public universities, has voted to changed the way chancellor searches are conducted. The new policy includes a section on confidentiality mandating that candidates' identities not be disclosed to the public.

DeWayne Barton in the Burton Street Peace Gardens
Angeli Wright / Asheville Citizen-Times

A highway expansion project in Asheville is set to destroy several homes in a historically black community for the third time. Parts of the Burton Street Neighborhood in West Asheville were demolished by state highway projects in the 1950s and 1960s. Now the proposed Interstate 26 connection project will go through the neighborhood again.

A picture of The Felice Brothers
The Felice Brothers

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

This time, we're talking with The Felice Brothers about 'Plunder,' a song off of their 2016 album 'Life In The Dark.'

The song has all the qualities of a great Felice Brothers tune, catchy guitar riffs and quirky lyrics. 

Listen to the episode here:

Islands Fresh Mex Grill in Wilmington hosted a fundraiser for Trask Middle School's PTA, which has been giving aid to families and teachers affected by Hurricane Florence. Staff and families at the event, just a week into school, already had the threat of
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

New Hanover County Schools are just getting back to class, meanwhile the threat of Hurricane Michael has many feeling nervous.

Trask Middle School staff and their families gathered at Islands Fresh Mex Grill in Wilmington for an evening fundraiser this week. Proceeds from the burritos and taco salads sold will go to the school's Parent/Teachers’ Association.

Residents of an apartment complex in Fayetteville, look at a flooded car in a parking lot on Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

In the storm-weary Carolinas, Hurricane Michael's approach is stoking fresh fears among homeowners who still have tarps on their roofs or industrial dehumidifiers drying their floors from destruction left by Hurricane Florence.

Areon Mobasher

Marie Antoinette’s biggest crime was being born to a family of wealth and privilege during a time of political upheaval. She was executed by guillotine. 

Yale University Press

In his new book, political science professor Patrick Deneen calls on readers to take a long, hard look at America’s oft-exalted liberal ideology.

St. Augustine's University, HBCU, Rooms to Go
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

One of the largest furniture companies in the country has dropped off more than $20,000 in new furniture at St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh. Rooms to Go is helping to establish the university’s Reading for Excellence Center.

'Hope to Hopeless': Will Governments Step Up After Second Storm?

Oct 10, 2018
A house is surrounded by floodwaters from Hurricane Florence in Lumberton, N.C., Monday, Sept. 17, 2018.
Gerald Herbert / AP

The Center for Public Integrity is a nonprofit investigative news organization based in Washington, DC. This story is part of the Center for Public Integrity’s “Abandoned in America” series, profiling communities connected by their profound needs and sense of political abandonment at a time when President Donald Trump’s administration has declared the nation’s war on poverty “largely over and a success.”

Edwin A. Anderson Elementary School 2nd grade teacher Jenna Parker talks with students on Oct. 4, 2018 as they reflect on their experiences Hurricane Florence made landfall in Wilmington.
Michael Cline Spencer / For WUNC

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

A North Carolina State University researcher is using underwater microphones to help better understand the extensive array of animals living in the state’s oyster reefs.
James Morrison / WUNC

While cleanup crews are getting a good idea of how much the damage Hurricane Florence will cost, it's not yet clear what the storm might have done to North Carolina's fishing industry. 

a flooded area with a man wading through water
Buzzfeed News

  Days before Hurricane Florence hit, rural Jones County ordered a mandatory evacuation for all residents. Left were behind dozens of migrant farm workers who woke up on Sept.15 to find waist-high deep water and property floating away.

Racial segregation persists in American neighborhoods, and there is an enduring belief that the divide stems from factors like wealth, personal prejudice, and the decision to live among one’s own. In his latest book, housing policy expert Richard Rothstein rips aparts that belief. Instead, he argues decades of deliberate U.S. government policies created the racially-divided neighborhoods that exist across the country today.

Rothstein explains the long term effects of discriminatory housing policies that have led to the wealth and education gaps between white and black Americans. Host Frank Stasio interviews Rothstein about his book “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America” (Liveright Publishing/2017).

photo of Tena Clark
photo by Stephanie Rocha

 Tena Clark may not be a household name, but most people have heard her music. She has written and produced for legends like Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle and Leann Rimes. She won a Grammy for her work with Natalie Cole, and contributed to the soundtracks for hit movies like “Hope Floats” and “My Best Friend’s Wedding.”

Duke University School of Medicine, Duke Integration
Duke University School of Medicine

One of the most revered doctors at Duke University died Sunday. Dr. Brenda Armstrong will be remembered for the impact she made in her community and at Duke University School of Medicine, where she spent more than 20 years.

Ana Nuñez
Courtesy of Ana Nuñez / Fay and Grafton

Ana Nuñez was nine years old before she ever stepped foot inside a grocery store or tasted an apple. Nuñez grew up in Cuba with intermittent access to food and medicine and abundant electricity shortages. In 1991 her father defected to the United States, and a couple years later the family followed.

Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment is located in the former Environment Hall, which will be renamed Grainger Hall in November 2018 in acknowledgement of a $20 million gift from the Grainger Family Descendants Fund.
Courtesy of Duke University

Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment has received a $20 million gift from the Grainger Family Descendants Fund at The Chicago Community Trust. The grant was recommended by an adviser to the fund who graduated from Duke University in 1979. It is one of the largest gifts ever received by the Nicholas School, or by any school of the environment, according to Duke University communications staff.

"These kinds of gifts don't come along all that often," said Toddi Steelman, the school's dean.

File photo of rising flood waters brought on by Hurricane Florence that threatened a building off highway 70 in Goldsboro, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Inside FEMA's statewide headquarters, workers in khakis, collared shirts and ID badges type away at computers, and work phones.

New Hanover County teacher Jenna Parker looks through her planner at her desk in her second grade classroom at Anderson Elementary School in Wilmington.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools, as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

FT. BRAGG STORIES: Earning The President's Hundred Tab

Oct 7, 2018
Portrait of Spc. Jonathon Wannemacher
Sgt. Brian Stephenson / 49th Public Affairs Detachment, Fort Bragg

Specialist Jonathon Wannemacher is an infantryman in the 82nd Airborne. He’s also a skilled marksman. At age 26, he’s ranked as one of the top 100 competitive shooters in the country. He placed 81 out of roughly 1,200 shooters in the President’s Hundred Match, a national competition held this past July in Camp Perry, OH.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers were in and out this week, addressing Florence relief while avoiding the usual partisan bickering or the occasional surprise. Becki Gray and Rob Schofield discuss this week's one-day special session, as well as a federal investigation into North Carolina's largest political donor, and a legislative committee taking aim at the treatment of college athletes.

Jose Perez-Santiago, right, holds his daughter Jordalis, 2, as they return to their home for the first time since it was flooded in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Spring Lake, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. "I didn't realize we would lose everyt
David Goldman / AP

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools, as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

State education leaders are calling for donations to assist students and educators who lost belongings and school supplies during Hurricane Florence.

a poster of Brett Kavanaugh that says "Kava Nope" in front of the Supreme Court Building in D.C.
(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) / AP

Millions of Americans were glued to their screens last Thursday when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford told her story of sexual assault to the Senate Judiciary Committee and an angry Brett Kavanaugh defended his name against the allegations. A similar battle played out more than two decades ago during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings.

The cover of 'For Your Own Good: Taxes, Paternalism, and Fiscal Discrimination in the Twenty-First Century.'
Courtesy of Todd Nesbit / Mercatus Center at George Mason University

Selective taxes on items like cigarettes and alcohol are often imposed by the U.S. government to help consumers make better choices. But according to economist Todd Nesbit, these so-called “sin taxes” can have unintended consequences that thwart this mission.

Pages