Fayetteville Police Department

Fayetteville City Council
City of Fayetteville, North Carolina

Who polices the police? Protesters rising up against George Floyd’s death and police violence have raised this question, including in Fayetteville. The Fayetteville City Council voted in support of establishing a citizens advisory board for issues of police misconduct at a special meeting Monday night. 

Melissa Sue Gerrits / Carolina Public Press, via AP

Police officers in Fayetteville took a knee in solidarity with protesters Monday, two days after the city had experienced violence and looting.

Gina Hawkins made history last summer when she became the first woman and first African-American police chief of Fayetteville. She is now one of six African-American women at the helm of police departments around the state. But when Hawkins took the job, she had no idea it would garner so much national attention, including an interview on NBC’s “Megyn Kelly Today.”

Fayetteville Police Department Captain Lars Paul shows the naloxone nose spray the Fayetteville police use to reverse opioid overdose.
Raul Rubiera / For WUNC

The drug naloxone has become key in saving lives from opioid overdoses. It’s such a vital tool for fighting the opioid epidemic that many law enforcement officers in North Carolina now carry it with them at all times.

A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

North Carolina police have killed a man they say stabbed a woman to death, then lunged at officers with a knife.

Peace and Pride, Charlotte Shooting, Fayetteville Police
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Editor's note:  This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

Fayetteville Police Try a New Approach to Drug Crimes

May 18, 2016
A stamp of heroin.
Psychonaught / Wikipedia

When Fayetteville launches its Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program this fall, it will be the first city in the South to try a new approach to policing drug crimes.

A traffic stop in Fairfax County, Virginia
Fairfax Police Department

In 2009, a sheriff’s deputy in mostly rural Orange County pulled over slightly more than 100 drivers. In most cases, the deputy determined equipment in the driver’s vehicle was malfunctioning and in a few that the vehicle was traveling unsafely along the road. The deputy stopped drivers for reasons that starkly contrasted those of most Orange County deputies, who pulled over a majority for unsafe driving and a relative few for malfunctioning equipment.