Computers

Inside the Kramden Institute warehouse in south Durham where computers and other electronics are refurbished.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

In a nondescript office park in south Durham, volunteers dug through a giant box of donated electronics. This particular box held hundreds of power cords for Apple iMacs, Lenovo ThinkPads and more. Surrounding that box were others with keyboards, monitors and other accessories.

It's not glamorous work, said Michael Abensour, executive director of the Kramden Institute, but it's necessary. Kramden is a nonprofit that fights to bridge the digital divide. It collects donated computer equipment, refurbishes it, and then gives it away – mostly to students who don't have access to a computer at home.

Computer keyboard
Defence Images/Creative Commons

More than half of North Carolinians were affected by personal data breaches in 2017. This month the North Carolina Department of Justice announced that the number of people hit in 2017 was seven times the number affected in 2016.

A picture of hands playing a video game controller
Creative Commons

The widely held notion – that people who play computer games are loners – might not be true after all.  A new study from North Carolina State University finds that gamers are expanding their social lives and often wind up meeting the people they compete against. 

Nick Taylor is an assistant professor of Digital Media at NC State, and worked on the study.  He says the findings were consistent regardless of the types of games being played.

Math teacher Melissa Tatum is one of 900 educators who has been trained on the tablet computers. She plans to use Brain Pop in her classroom this fall.
Jeff Tiberii

    

One of the largest classroom technology initiatives in U.S. history is underway in Guilford County. This week middle school students can begin picking up their tablet computers and get comfortable with the devices prior to the start of classes.

Teachers have been learning the ins and outs of these Android-based tablets all summer.

"There is also an encyclopedia on here, all kinds of different things that come preloaded," said Eric Loveday, 8th grade science teacher at Southwest Middle School.

Most of the computers sold in the United States are made somewhere else in the world.  That includes computers made by Lenovo.  But yesterday, the computer giant announced it will soon open its first U.S. based manufacturing plant.  And that plant will be in North Carolina.

Lenovo has been moving like lightening during the past 18 months.  The company has gone from 400 retail stores to four-thousand.  And it’s paid off quarter after quarter.  David Schmook is President of Lenovo for North America. 

Apple Incorporated has the go-ahead to provide power for its new data center in western North Carolina.