Movies On The Radio

Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes in studio with State of Things Host Frank Stasio.
Credit Ben McKeown / For WUNC

"Movies on the Radio" is a series of conversations about the silver screen from The State of Things.

Listeners provide feedback about their favorites and least favorites. Then, Frank Stasio and film experts Laura Boyes and Marsha Gordon take an in-depth look at what moves us at the movies.

Laura Boyes is a film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art and Marsha Gordon is a film professor at North Carolina State University.

The next episode of the series airs Wednesday,  Oct. 31.  We want to know what your favorite campy or comic horror movie is. Do you crave the camp of "Evil Dead?" Do you prefer a comedy-horror film like "Shaun of the Dead?" Email us at sot@wunc.org or tweet at us with #SOTMovie.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

When Dustin Hoffman auditioned for the role of Benjamin Braddock in “The Graduate,” he did not imagine he would become a Hollywood star.

The theater actor was certain he bombed the screen test, so imagine his surprise when he landed the role that would catapult his career to unprecedented stardom. “The Graduate” became an instant classic. 

This month's Movies on the Radio is a live event at the Hunt Library at North Carolina State University.  The State of Things host Frank Stasio will join Marsha Gordon of NC State University's Film Studies department and

Movies On The Radio: Alfred Hitchcock

Aug 26, 2015
Alfred Hitchcock
Insomnia Cured Here / Flickr Creative Commons

Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most celebrated and prolific filmmakers in cinema.

He directed more than 50 films in six decades, mastered the art of psychological thrillers and suspense, and meticulously crafted scenes filled with compelling visuals. 

What's Your Favorite Hitchcock Movie?

Jul 10, 2015
Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Ask most cinephiles about the greatest movie directors and producers ever, and Alfred Hitchcock's name will  come up. 

Hitchcock was the "Master of Suspense," unlocking the suspenseful storytelling method for the screen. He toyed with camera movement and shot framing. He is simply one of the most influential cinematographers of all-time. 

Image of Sandra Bullock accepting a Golden Raspberry award in 2010 for worst actress.
Shari B. Ellis / Flickr Creative Commons

A "bad" movie can ruin a night out, or it can secretly be your favorite source of entertainment for a night in.

We all have movies that we would rather not admit we enjoy, but sometimes we cannot stop ourselves from loving corny one-liners or ridiculous action scenes.

They are on the shelf marked "Guilty Pleasures." 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Sometimes you watch a movie and realize that it is just, well...bad. Maybe the acting is subpar or the film lacks a cohesive plot. But sometimes you watch these so-called bad movies and realize you actually like them. Despite the puns, cheesy sound effects or box office flop, you like the movie but don't want everyone knowing how much you like it. Some of these movies probably deserve Golden Razzy consideration. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

  Science fiction is a genre made for the movies. The narratives make viewers question reality, think about space exploration and ponder human existence. Sci-fi films have produced some of the most financially successful films in movie history.

The Matrix
Wikipedia

The science fiction genre contains some of the most successful movies in cinema history. Avatar grossed more than $2.7 billion, making it the single highest-grossing film of all time. The Star Wars series, which releases its 7th title later this year, is the 5th highest-grossing film series. The Transformers series also crack the top 10 highest-grossing series. 

Airplane!
Wikipedia

From silent film to slapstick comedy, humor has been a staple of the silver screen since the dawn of modern cinema. Listeners share their favorite funny scenes from a wide range of movies from “Young Frankenstein” to “Airplane." Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes and North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon about the funniest moments in film.

Jim Carrey
Wikipedia

For the next edition of the "Movies On The Radio" series The State of Things wants to know which movie scenes crack you up. We don't mean scenes that just made you chuckle – we mean knee-slapping, doubled-over, abs-hurt-the-next-day laughter. 

Is it the takeoff scene from Airplane!?

The ribs scene from I'm Gonna Git You Sucka?

Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Wikipedia

The film Boyhood was a box office hit this year. Director Richard Linklater and his team shot the film over 12 years, a feat that impressed moviegoers and critics alike. Boyhood was nominated for six Academy Awards, and Patricia Arquette, who plays the mother, took best supporting actress.

But even though the film is novel in its lengthy production, at Boyhood's core is a story told time and again throughout the history of cinema: adolescence. 

Movies On The Radio: A Kiss

Feb 11, 2015

    

A kiss is just a kiss. Or is it? 

One of the most iconic on screen lip locks was the tearful and delicate embrace on Casablanca. On today's Movies on the Radio show, listeners share their favorite silver screen kisses.  

Oscars
Prayitno / Flickr Creative Commons

 

The Oscar nominations were announced earlier today with Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel topping the list with nine nominations each.  As the stars prepare to hit the red carpet, listeners take a look back at the best and worst films of 2014.

From Boyhood to Interstellar, Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes and North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon.

Gone Girl Premiere at the 52nd New York Film Festival, October 2014
aphrodite-in-nyc Wikimedia

From Boyhood To Gone Girl, 2014 had many blockbuster movies. What is your favorite and why? Answer the survey and leave your contact information if you are interested in the possibility of being on the show.

It's A Wonderful Life
wikipedia

Note: This program is a rebroadcast from December 23, 2013.  

From Elf to Home Alone and Love Actually to A Christmas Story, the tradition of a holiday film is as vital to some people as singing carols or decorating a tree. Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, professor of film studies at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art.

 

The original poster for Dirty Dancing, which was filmed in North Carolina.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dirty-dancing.jpg

From The Last of the Mohicans to Dirty Dancing and Days of Thunder, movies made in North Carolina have gone on to great box office success. 

Cold Mountain, NC
Wikipedia

In this month's episode of the Movies on the Radio series, The State of Things takes a look at North Carolina movies. What is your favorite and why? Answer the survey and leave your contact information if you are interested in the possibility of being on the show.

The Big Combo (1955)
Wikipedia

  

Smoke-filled rooms, femmes fatales and twisting crime plots are markers of a period in cinematography known as film noir.

Two silhouetted figures in the 1955 film The Big Combo
Wikipedia

  The highly stylized crime dramas of the 1940's marked a very specific space in cinematic history: film noir. The genre is called "one of Hollywood’s only organic artistic movements" by the Film Noir Foundation

Meet Me In St. Louis
Wikipedia

Since the transition from silent films in the 1920s, the musical has been a staple of the movie industry. Some of the cinema’s biggest hits include song and dance.  From Singing in the Rain to Grease, host Frank Stasio looks at musicals at the movies with North Carolina University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes.

I Feel Pretty from West Side Story
Wikipedia

  Singing in the Rain. West Side Story. Grease. These wildly popular musicals became big hits on the silver screen as well. 

Later this month, North Carolina State film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes will talk with host Frank Stasio about musicals in the cinema on The State of Things. 

Image of Superman
Flickr/Nicholas Rumas

When you were a child, did you imagine being Superman? 

Wikimedia

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show from Tuesday, March 18, 2014.

For many, The Wizard of Oz is a happy tale of Dorothy and her little dog Toto skipping along the yellow brick road.

But for some, the Wicked Witch and the flying monkeys were the visions of nightmares.

Yankee Doodle Dandy
Via Flickr Cliff1066

  

Tomorrow, across the nation, Americans will celebrate our independence with parades, barbeques and fireworks. Some will celebrate the holiday with an annual viewing of their favorite patriotic film.

Groundhog Day
Wikipedia

  You know that movie. The one you can almost recite word for word. The one you had on VHS but you wore out the copy. The one that comes on the television and you are glued to the screen.

What is it that draws viewers to these films? Why would someone watch something they have seen so many times before? Is there a sentimentality embodied in watching the same film over and over? Does it change as we age?

The Great Gatsby movie set
Wikimedia

  The Hunger Games. Harry Potter. The Great Gatsby. Blockbuster films or popular literature? Do you ever walk out of the movie theater and hear, "The book was so much better than the movie."? Or do you prefer the silver screen adaptation of your favorite novel? Turning a book into a movie poses all sorts of challenges.

Wikimedia

  

For many, The Wizard of Oz is a happy tale of Dorothy and her little dog Toto skipping along the yellow brick road. But for some, the Wicked Witch and the flying monkeys were the visions of nightmares.

Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes about the movies that traumatized you as a child.

Wikipedia

From May-December romance to a giant ape and a blonde he can hold in the palm of his hand, love stories on the big screen take many forms.

Just in time for Valentine's Day, North Carolina State film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes return to The State of Things to talk with host Frank Stasio about unexpected love in the movies.

Tom Cruise (left) and Jack Nicholson (right)
Official Movie Poster via Wikipedia

For many moviegoers, Jack Nicholson's famous line in A Few Good Men is one of the most memorable courtroom scenes ever.

"You can’t handle the truth! …Son, we live in a world that has walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with guns. Who’s gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinburg? I have a greater responsibility than you could possibly fathom...  I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it."

It's A Wonderful Life
wikipedia

From Elf to Home Alone and Love Actually to A Christmas Story, the tradition of a holiday film is as vital to some people as singing carols or decorating a tree. 

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