NC Coronavirus Updates

  

News coverage and resources related to the spread and response to the coronavirus in North Carolina and beyond.

For more information about the vaccine, check out Q&A: What We Know About North Carolina's COVID Vaccine Rollout.

Governor Cooper and members of the Coronavirus Task Force share an update on COVID-19. Watch, here, live starting at 3 p.m.

In this Aug. 18, 2020 file photo, a student works outside Ehrighaus dormitory on campus at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C.
Gerry Broome / AP

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of Oct. 26.

4:50 p.m. - Students in Cumberland County will return to in-person learning in January, given that COVID-19 metrics are trending in the right direction at that time. The Cumberland County Board of Education approved a plan today for students to return to classrooms on a staggered schedule starting January 7. - Celeste Gracia, WUNC

Concertina wire surrounding a prison
Kate Ter Harr / Flickr Creative Commons

An elderly North Carolina prison inmate with pre-existing conditions and a positive COVID-19 test has died, officials said.

A news release from the N.C. Department of Public Safety on Wednesday said the inmate, who was in his 80s, died at the Central Prison hospital on Tuesday.

A car decorated with pro-Trump stickers and decals makes its way through downtown Hillsborough Saturday as part of the "Trump Train" to show support for President Trump and other North Carolina Republicans on the ballot this November.
Mitchell Northam / WUNC

There doesn't appear to be a strong correlation in North Carolina between counties that voted for President Donald Trump, and counties with high numbers of new COVID-19 cases, according to a WUNC analysis.

Courtesy Craven County Government

Craven County Commissioner Johnnie Sampson Jr., has died after a battle with COVID-19. The 87-year-old had been a county commissioner for 24 years.

Governor Roy Cooper in a candid photo wearing his black face mask where he gives coronavirus briefings.
File Photo, Courtesy Governor Roy Cooper Twitter

The United States hit a new record this week: more than 100,000 new COVID-19 cases in one day. The virus is surging around the country — including in North Carolina. The state broke its own record last week with 2,886 new infections in one day on Thursday, Oct. 29. 

Governor Roy Cooper in a candid photo wearing his black face mask where he gives coronavirus briefings.
File Photo, Courtesy Governor Roy Cooper Twitter

North Carolina’s coronavirus cases continue to climb, with the state hitting its second-highest new case count on Thursday.

an eviction notice on a front door
Steve Rhodes / Creative Commons/http://bit.ly/2HmJ9nV

Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper signed an executive order Wednesday preventing landlords from evicting tenants who are unable to pay their rent.

Thousands of teachers in North Carolina are currently faced with a difficult choice: go back to teaching in-person class, or continue to teach virtually and minimize their risk of exposure to Covid. But, in truth, it's not even really their decision — at least, not entirely.

Host Dave DeWitt talks with WUNC Education Reporter Liz Schlemmer about the difficult situation for North Carolina teachers weighing their health, and the health of loved ones, with their job. 

We also hear from physicians at Duke University about ways to stay safe during the upcoming holiday season.
 


Monday marks the return of in-person teaching at Wake County Public Schools. Students arrive at Davis Drive Elementary to temperature checks and health screenings in the carpool line.
Kate Medley / For WUNC

Many of Wake County's pre-K through third grade students returned to classrooms Monday. 

At Davis Drive Elementary School in Cary, it felt a bit like the first day of school.

Greenville Covid
City of Greenville, via Flickr / https://bit.ly/3avgM3O

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of Oct. 19.

7:35 a.m. – Clemson’s Trevor Lawrence – widely regarded as the best quarterback in the ACC and a top NFL Draft prospect – tested positive for COVID-19, the team announced Thursday. According to CBS Sports, Lawrence tested positive on Wednesday. He will miss the Tigers’ game Saturday against Boston College, but he could be cleared for No. 1 Clemson’s bout with No. 4 Notre Dame on Nov. 7.

COVID coronavirus mask kids bikes police greenville
City of Greenville, via Flickr / https://bit.ly/2RONEMk

A new analysis from data scientists modeling the impact of COVID-19 in North Carolina shows rural areas and the older population are now being hit harder by the coronavirus.

N.C. State Wolfpack Coronavirus Masks
Gerry Broome / AP

Following other campuses trying to contain the spread of COVID-19, North Carolina State University will delay the spring semester's start and eliminate spring break.

N.C. Governor Roy Cooper and N.C. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen.
N.C. Department of Public Safety

North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper said Wednesday that the state will keep its reopening guidelines in place for three more weeks, at a time when key coronavirus metrics worsen.

A school classroom with desks that are socially distanced.
Keri Brown/WFDD

When school resumed in August, nearly half of all public-school students in North Carolina spent at least some time in-person, in a classroom. Now, more districts are looking to return to some face-to-face instruction. 

The people at the so-called 'Plan B' schools may have something to teach others about what has worked, and what hasn't.

ECU / wikimedia commons

A university in North Carolina has announced temporary furloughs and pay cuts for its athletics staff due to budget deficits caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

A photo of the Durham County Jail: a large silver building.
Laura Candler/WUNC

COVID-19 is spreading more quickly throughout North Carolina's population: public health metrics in the last week have some experts worried the state is heading in the wrong direction. Research shows the virus spreads more quickly indoors and when people have prolonged close contact with one another — something that's almost unavoidable in places like jails and prisons. 

Coronavirus N.C. State prep mask
Gerry Broome / AP

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of Oct. 12.

4:45 p.m. - NC State University will not have a spring break next semester after all. In a message Thursday, Chancellor Randy Woodson said the university reversed its original decision announced last month after talking to students, faculty and health experts. The university will instead have four wellness days spread throughout the spring semester. The university also decided to push back the start of the semester by a week. Classes will start on January 19. - Celeste Gracia, WUNC

Photo courtesy of Saint Augustine's University

The Saint Augustine's University community is mourning the death of its president.

Irving McPhail died this week from complications of COVID-19. Officials said he did not contract the virus from the campus.

A picture of the map of North Carolina with different shades of red to show the number of confirmed cases in each county
Creative Commons

North Carolina hit its highest one-day case count of COVID-19 since the pandemic began. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services reported 2,684 new cases of COVID-19 Friday, and shared that hospitalizations are also creeping back up. 

Governor Roy Cooper in a candid photo wearing his black face mask where he gives coronavirus briefings.
File Photo, Courtesy Governor Roy Cooper Twitter

North Carolina's top public health official is warning that the state's coronavirus numbers are heading in the wrong direction as the state's Democratic governor considers whether to tighten restrictions or reopen more of the economy.

North Carolina U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis is ending his quarantine. The senator, who’s seeking reelection next month, announced he had tested positive for the coronavirus on Oct. 2.

Tillis’ office on Tuesday released a letter from his doctor clearing him to return to work and resume in-person activities.

Duke University Chapel
Bill Snead / Duke University

Duke University has managed to avoid major COVID-19 outbreaks by enforcing standard precautions, robust testing and contact tracing.

Duke head football coach David Cutcliffe
Nell Redmond / Pool Photo via AP

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of Oct. 5. 

7:10 p.m. - The Saint Augustine's University community is mourning the death of its president. Irving McPhail died this week from complications of COVID-19. Officials said he did not contract the virus from the campus. McPhail was president of the historically Black university in Raleigh for roughly 100 days before he passed. He started as president July 15, following a nationwide search. - Naomi Prioleau, WUNC

Emails Reveal NC's Early Steps To Prepare For Pandemic

Oct 8, 2020
NC Watchdog Collaborative

Mid-afternoon on Thursday, February 13, Laketha Miller sent an email to division directors at the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, asking them to use a new code to track the amount of time DHHS employees spend working on tasks related to the coronavirus.

UNC Health Care
UNC Health Care / UNC Health Care

Doctors at UNC-Chapel Hill say early studies of monoclonal antibody therapies show promising results in treating COVID-19.

Joel Muniz / Unsplash / creative commons

Food pantries on university and college campuses in North Carolina are experiencing high demand during the COVID-19 pandemic, even though there are fewer students around. Campus food pantries have historically served students in need, and that need has only increased since mid-March.

Gerry Broome / AP Photo

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of Sept. 28. 

11:40 a.m. - The Forsyth County courthouse will have limited operations available next week after five employees tested positive for COVID-19. The Winston-Salem Journal reports court officials are working with the Forsyth County Health Department to conduct contracting tracing. The courthouse previously closed for a short time in April after other employees also tested positive for the coronavirus. – Celeste Gracia, WUNC

9:50 a.m. - Duke University is laying off 75 employees in its Talent Identification Program at the beginning of next year. Duke TIP helps select pre-college students across the country access advanced educational opportunities, according to its website. Duke TIP was forced to close its summer programs because of the pandemic. All other programs will also be closed for the rest of this year through next semester. The university will instead be creating a new unit in the Office of Academic Affairs to help serve pre-college students. – Celeste Gracia, WUNC

Stanly County Teacher Dies Of COVID-19

Oct 5, 2020
Stanly County Schools

A Stanly County Schools elementary school teacher has died of COVID-19 after becoming ill 10 days ago. Julie Davis, a third-grade teacher at Norwood Elementary School for the past two years, died on Sunday. 

Scandal and litigation have cast a cloud of uncertainty over North Carolina elections. On Friday, incumbent Republican Sen. Thom Tillis announced he had tested positive for coronavirus. He's in self-isolation experiencing mild symptoms.

Notably, Tillis serves on the Senate Judiciary Committee and he’s the second member of that panel to test positive – along with Republican Michael Lee of Utah.

If Tillis and Lee are out for some time, the Republican majority's efforts to quickly push through Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could be delayed.

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