Greensboro

Keri Brown / WFDD

Karleigh King stands on her front porch, warming up her voice while her kids are down for naptime. This is her new normal, singing hymns at home, not with her congregation at Grace Bible Church in Winston-Salem. The building reopened earlier this month, but it looks a little different. Space is limited to 50 people, so there’s an online signup sheet. Every other church pew is blocked off for personal distancing. Only about a quarter of the congregation is attending indoor services right now.

Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

A group of faith leaders in Greensboro, known as the Pulpit Forum, has demands for its city amid protests against police brutality.

A man hold a sign at a protest in downtown Raleigh on May 30, 2020 to protest the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis earlier in the week.
Peyton Sickles / For WUNC

The city of Raleigh lifted its curfew and state of emergency on Monday, a week after it was imposed on residents.

Travis Bell, a dentist in Greensboro, said even though he closed his office in March, he's continued to work through the shutdown to provide emergency procedures to patients.
Courtesy Travis Bell DDS

Since the coronavirus was classified as a pandemic, it has changed how the dental industry operates.

Courtesy of Shayla Stewart

High school seniors are missing out on final milestones, performances and events that'd normally help mark the end of a signifcant chapter in their lives. For Shayla Stewart, a senior graduating from Western Guilford High School in Greensboro, missing prom is just one of the things she was looking forward to.

Courtesy Jen Miles Guilderton

"I lost seven contracts in three weeks. My current employment situation is dire."

Courtesy Dan Epstein

"It just seems like the whole system was set-up to fail us."

Kevin Fuller
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper's statewide stay-at-home order went into effect earlier this week. That presents a particular problem for the 9,000 North Carolinians who make up the state's homeless population.

Allen G. Breed, File / AP Photo

For years, the Piedmont Triad’s cities have been chopped up and divvied between Republican-dominated congressional districts, diluting their heavy concentration of Democrats. But last year, after courtroom fights over partisan gerrymandering concluded, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point were united in a new 6th district that’s likely to go blue.

A bronze statue of four young men walking forward shoulder-to-shoulder with a blue sky behind them
Earl Letherberry

On Feb. 1, 1960, the fight for civil rights changed forever when four freshmen students from North Carolina A&T State University refused to leave a lunch counter at Woolworth’s Department Store in Greensboro. 

museum
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Sixty years ago, four North Carolina A&T State University students walked into the Woolworth's Department Store in downtown Greensboro.

A row of pink salt is lined above a shorter bar of green Matcha tea powder.
Dhanraj Emanuel

After moving to the states, Dhanraj Emanuel craved the Indian dishes of his childhood. He had never cooked before, so he mixed spices by smell to sate his nostalgia.

Emanuel comes from a family of photographers. Soon enough, the two worlds collided and Emanuel found his way into the field of food photography. Finding commercial success required leveraging food to elicit emotions like desire, FOMO, or comfort. But his new project does just the opposite. 

dowtowngreensboro.org

In the lobby of the Triad Stage theater in downtown Greensboro, residents placed sticky notes on large display boards.  On them are written things like "more residential units," "transit for college students" and "a multi-use arena."

Courtesy Em & Ty

Emma and Tyler Millard have their own separate, busy musical careers, but when they perform and write together, they deliver a sound that is moody and intimate. The couple pen tales that conjure the ghosts of the past and dig into feelings of nostalgia, often infused with a healthy dose of humor.

 Photo of Greensboro downtown skyline.
Courtesy Flickr/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/ucumari/306972641

Greensboro city officials are looking into high levels of a likely-carcinogenic chemical compound identified at the city’s wastewater treatment plant. The levels of 1,4 dioxane in the wastewater were more than 2,700 times the EPA limit for drinking water.

Dative, a Congolese refugee, is at her Greensboro home on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. The proposed refugee acceptance cap is set for 18,000, making it the lowest acceptance cap in history.
Lynn Hey / For WUNC

Dative takes pride in showing off her five bedroom, three-bathroom home in Greensboro, especially the two rooms she has set up for her teenage niece and nephew.

Archived illustrated image.
North Carolina State Archives

Even before the Lost Colony, great waves of emigration and migration were reshaping the region now known as North Carolina. As foreign empires invaded the land, new alliances and identities formed between the Tuscarora People along the coast and freed West Africans and Caribean Natives.

An afro-indigenous woman's face edited over the image of an indigenous young man.
Courtesy of Damola Akintunde and Crystal Cavalier-Keck

Indigenous Peoples’ Day reimagines Columbus Day to celebrate the other side of European “discovery.” These celebrations advance concrete political causes, such as the re-establishment of land rights in the Piedmont.

Gray playing his guitar in front of a mic.
Anita Rao / WUNC

Barry Gray’s debut release is the culmination of a family man’s slow-burning reflections.

Barber Park
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Residents of Greensboro have been offering a wide range of opinions on who should be the city's next police chief. They've been offered during a series of community input meetings, conducted by the police department.

A tree and telephone line fell across a street in Greensboro.
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

The city of Greensboro has helped more than 200 renters become homeowners this year.

Pickett measures her patient's height.
Courtesy of UNC Greensboro

When Stephanie Pickett was a nurse at Duke University Medical Center, more than 90% of the patients she saw with kidney failure were black. This shocking racial health disparity both bewildered her and inspired her to take action.

Cecil sits on a stool playing his guitar and sings into a mic.
Courtesy of David Ray Cecil

Singer and guitarist Dave Ray Cecil began writing music when he was six years old. As a child, he strung notes together on the piano and secretly used his brother’s guitar to write songs.

The city of Greensboro received a $12,000 federal grant from the Historic Preservation Fund to document and survey historic Greensboro buildings built and designed by African Americans.

the graphic for the project 'On The Margins'
WFDD

As of 2016, Greensboro and Winston-Salem had the highest rates of evictions in all of North Carolina. 

A yearlong collaborative reporting project dove into the topic: exploring how evictions create a ripple effect in people’s lives, the role the Housing Authority of Winston-Salem plays in evictions there and a look at one redlined community in Greensboro. 

David Merritt, 56, wears his house key around his neck as he leaves his tiny home to go back to work on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 in Greensboro, N.C.
Lynn Hey / For WUNC

Six houses sit between some brush and a brick apartment building on Causey Street in Greensboro.  

The houses are quite small -- just under 500 square feet -- and that’s one of the reasons why they were built.

Greensboro officials are investigating claims of alleged Medicaid housing fraud.

The scheme allegedly put homeless people in apartments if they were enrolled in their substance abuse program. However, some of those enrolled weren’t addicted to heavy drugs. If that was the case, officials would use urine tainted by drugs to enroll them in the program.

Carolyn Coleman serves on the NAACP National Board of Directors and as the First Vice President of the North Carolina NAACP
NAACP

Carolyn Coleman got her first taste of community activism as a young girl in a segregated community in Savannah, Georgia. She and her mother went door-to-door collecting signatures to advocate for neighborhood improvements. She continued to work for civil rights and social justice for close to six decades.

Lynn Hey / WUNC

Smiling faces of children and adults listened to a youth choir outside The Kellin Foundation. The nonprofit celebrated being nationally recognized as a child trauma recovery center by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

Jennifer Brookland

Sam Frazier is a Greensboro-based singer, songwriter and musician with two solo CDs under his belt in addition to collaborations with some of the area’s top talent. The lyrics in his original songs move between silly and soulful, as his poetic storytelling speaks to our all-too-human nature. 

Pages