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WUNC Reflects On 20th Anniversary Of The September 11, 2001 Attacks

Wakiley Ramen Chowdhury makes a rubbing of his niece's name, Shakila Yasmin, at the edge of the North Pool at the 9/11 Memorial.
Justin Lane/UPI/Landov
/
via NPR file
Wakiley Ramen Chowdhury makes a rubbing of his niece's name, Shakila Yasmin, at the edge of the North Pool at the 9/11 Memorial.

On Saturday, WUNC will air NPR coverage of events commemorating the 20th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001.

Terrorist attacks that day marked the deadliest assault on American soil. Between the attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and a hijacked flight that crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, nearly 3,000 people were killed. Using technology, more victims are still being identified today.

The events of that day in 2001 led to U.S. troops invading Afghanistan, and to the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.

NPR’s coverage on WUNC begins Saturday on “Weekend Edition” with host Scott Simon who will be joined by NPR correspondents Ron Elving, Asma Khalid, Jasmine Garsd and Scott Detrow.

  • From 8:00 a.m.  to 10:00 a.m. NPR will be providing live coverage of ceremonies at several locations around country including the World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan.  The network will observe moments of silence at 8:46 a.m. and 9:37 a.m.
    • The first time marks the moment that American Airlines Flight 11 struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center. The second time marks the moment that American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon.
    • The audio of these moments won’t be literally silent. Listeners should expect to hear ambient sound of outdoor sounds at memorials in Arlington, Virginia and New York City, as well as reflective commentary from the host.
Two members of the New York City Fire Department look through the open ceiling of the Oculus, part of the World Trade Center transportation hub in New York on Tuesday. The transit hall ceiling window was opened just before 10:28 a.m., marking the moment that the North Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed on Sept. 11, 2001.
Craig Ruttle/AP
Two members of the New York City Fire Department look through the open ceiling of the Oculus, part of the World Trade Center transportation hub in New York on Tuesday.

  • From 10:00 a.m. to noon, NPR will continue live coverage of ceremonies including an address from former President George W. Bush in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, commemorating the crash of United Flight 93. WUNC will not air “On the Media” at 11:00 a.m. but stay with “Weekend Edition” through noon.
  • At noon, WUNC will broadcast “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me,” unless special coverage demands that we stay with NPR into the noon hour.  In that case, when appropriate, WUNC will join “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me” in progress.
  • NPR will continue offering special coverage through 2:00 p.m.

  • At 5:00 p.m. “All Things Considered,” hosted by Michel Martin, will continue to recap and focus on Sept. 11 coverage.

President Joe Biden is expected to visit memorials in New York City, Shanksville, Pennsylvania and Arlington, Virginia on Saturday. He is also expected to deliver remarks.

Topics that are expected to be covered during NPR’s 9/11 coverage include:

  • Conversations with survivors of the attack on the World Trade Center.
  • How 9/11 changed – or didn’t – what it means to be Muslim in America.
  • New York Fire Department Engine 54 lost every firefighter they sent to battle the fires. We’ll hear from family of those who died as well as current firefights about the legacy of the day.
  • A report from NPR’s Steve Inskeep in Pakistan on the view of the anniversary there.
  • An excerpt from the Special Program “Sacred Ground,” about United Flight 93, reported by NPR’s Scott Detrow and Tim Lambert.
  • Scott Simon and NPR's Ron Elving will discuss how U.S. government has changed since 2001.

Thanks for listening to WUNC. Click here for more of NPR's 9/11 coverage.

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