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From 'Ironman' To Homeless: Life After The Gridiron

Kenan Memorial Stadium, where the Tar Heels have played since 1927
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Former University of North Carolina football star Ryan Hoffman was once a giant. 

  The 6-foot-5-inch, 287-pound left tackle for UNC's 1997 football team helped guide the Tarheels to an 11-1 record. But Hoffman looks like a different person today. He is homeless and most likely dealing with brain trauma from his years on the football field.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with reporter Juliet Macur who tracked down Hoffman for a New York Times profile.

Macur's columns on Hoffman can be found here and here.

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Hady Mawajdeh is a native Texan, born and raised in San Antonio. He listened to Fresh Air growing up and fell in love with public radio. He earned his B.A. in Mass Communication at Texas State University and specialized in electronic media. He worked at NPR affiliate stations KUT and KUTX in Austin, Texas as an intern, producer, social media coordinator, and a late-night deejay.
Phoebe Judge is an award-winning journalist whose work has been featured on a numerous national radio programs. She regularly conducts interviews and anchors WUNC's broadcast of Here & Now. Previously, Phoebe served as producer, reporter and guest host for the nationally distributed public radio program The Story. Earlier in her career, Phoebe reported from the gulf coast of Mississippi. She covered the BP oil spill and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina for Mississippi Public Broadcasting and National Public Radio. Phoebe's work has won multiple Edward R. Murrow and Associated Press awards. Phoebe was born and raised in Chicago and is graduate of Bennington College and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.
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