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[[ This page created for the 2013 concert broadcasts. For the 2014 schedule and more, go here ]]00000177-6edd-df44-a377-6fff43930000A WUNC Summer tradition continues with the North Carolina Symphony. Monday nights during August you'll hear special broadcasts from the North Carolina Symphony on the radio and via our live streams. The programs air at 1o p.m. David HartmanThese concerts, presented by veteran broadcaster and former "Good Morning America" host David Hartman, will be available online here for one week following the broadcasts. More details about the broadcasts (and, other WUNC stories about the North Carolina Symphony) follow:

"Romantic And Terrifying," Grant Llwellyn Leads The NC Symphony In Sibelius

Music Director Grant Llewellyn
Michael Zirkle
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Our first North Carolina Symphony broadcast for the 2013 Summer season presents the Symphony's Music Director Grant Llewellyn conducting Sibelius's Symphony No. 2.

Jean Sibelius began writing his Second Symphony while vacationing in Italy in 1901. It departs sonically from some of his other work composed in his native Finland in that it's sometimes described as more "sunny" and "uplifting" than his other compositions from around the same time. Also, some listeners hear a nationalistic current that imagines a Finland free of Russian domination.

"I think it's as terrifying in places as anything he ever wrote." - Grant Llwellyn

"Some people would say that the Second Symphony is perhaps uncharacteristic  of his symphonic output in that in that it is as Romantic as it is, " said Llewellyn while talking with host David Hartman. However, he doesn't see the work as sunny reaction to a holiday in Italy as some might propose. "I think it's as terrifying in places as anything he ever wrote. The second movement is thorny and sort of monolithic. It's sort of cataclysmic stuff. This is the Sibelius of the endless forest and lakes."

"I have an opportunity to see this landscape (of Sibelius) because I conduct in Finland three or four times every year and I'm beginning to get a real sense of the epic proportions of that country. And, I see it immediately in the Second Symphony," continued Llewellyn.

This first broadcast also features a recording of Sibelius’s Humoresque No. 1 in D minor for Violin and Orchestra, played by Anne-Sophie Mutter and the Staatskapelle Dresden, with Andre Previn conducting.

Audio from this broadcast will be available for about a week following its initial airing.

Next week, hear a program of American composers with Aaron Copland's Lincoln Portrait and Symphony No. 2 by Charles Ives.

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