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The Floods After Florence: A Live Two Hour Special From Around North Carolina

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Linda Rupert
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Tropical Depression Florence is well inland, but North Carolina is still reeling from the storm. All of the state’s 100 counties have experienced some form of National Weather System alert, from flash flood watch to hazardous weather outlook.

 
In a two-hour special broadcast to stations around North Carolina, The State of Things speaks with residents, journalists, officials and experts about the devastating storm impact. 

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The Floods After Florence: Hour Two Of A Live Two Hour Special From Around North Carolina.

The city of New Bern is just one community that is relieved the worst of Florence has passed. The city saw over 450 storm-related rescues and New Bern mayor Dana Outlaw joins State of Things host Frank Stasio to talk about surviving Hurricane Florence. Another community struggling with rising water is Lumberton. Bill French, the Director of Emergency Services for the city provides an update on conditions in Robeson County. A FEMA representative joins the discussion to dispel myths about flood insurance and provide resources and updates to those in need of assistance. 

 
Licensed professional counselor Loni Crumb joins Stasio throughout the show to give advice for those suffering from the effects of the storm and to respond to listeners calling in. She is an assistant professor in the College of Education at East Carolina University. Sarah Kirby joins them to give listeners helpful information about how to preserve their most valuable items and returning their homes to a safe condition after the storm. She is the State Program Leader for Family and Consumer Sciences and a professor at North Carolina State University. 
 

Stasio gets updates from Sarah Moore in Swansboro and Alison Rowat in New Bern who both decided to stay during Hurricane Florence, and Kirsten Crook, who evacuated Boiling Spring Lakes to Atlanta, Georgia. He also checks in with Chrissy Becker, a Jacksonville resident who evacuated to Hickory and then Cary, to hear how her family is coping with being away from their home, which likely sustained roof damage. Cape Fear Riverkeeper Kemp Burdette shares an update from Pender County, where he has traveled to the L. V. Sutton Power Station outside of Wilmington to report on displaced coal ash. 
 

Meteorologist James Morrow from the National Weather Service in Raleigh provides hourly updates on rain and flood conditions around the state. Reporters join throughout the hour with information and personal stories from residents. WUNC’s Managing Editor Dave DeWitt has the latest on power outages, shelters and evacuations. WUNC reporters Lisa Philip and Jay Price are in Fayetteville and Lumberton respectively with their view from the ground. In Wilmington, WHQR reporter Vince Winkel and News Director and Coastline Host Rachel Lewis Hilburn share their reporting. From Charlotte, WFAE’s Steve Harrison provides an update.
 

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.
Dana is an award-winning producer who began as a personality at Rock 92. Once she started creating content for morning shows, she developed a love for producing. Dana has written and produced for local and syndicated commercial radio for over a decade. WUNC is her debut into public radio and she’s excited to tell deeper, richer stories.
Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.
Laura Pellicer is a digital reporter with WUNC’s small but intrepid digital news team.
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