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What Can We Learn From 20th-Century Leaders?

book cover for 'the peacemakers: leadership lessons from twentieth-century statesmanship'
Courtesy of Sanford School of Public Policy
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There were breakthroughs on several seemingly impossible conflicts in the 20th century: the Cold War came to a close; apartheid ended in South Africa; relations warmed between the United States and China; and the violence between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland quieted. Can 21st century leaders learn from those behind these peacemaking efforts from the previous 100 years? Bruce Jentleson tackled this question in his new book, “The Peacemakers: Leadership Lessons From Twentieth-Century Statesmanship” (W. W. Norton and Company/2018). The book profiles 13 leaders, including negotiators, activists, and trailblazers.

headshot of Bruce Jentleson
Credit Courtesy of Sanford School of Public Policy
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Bruce Jentleson is a professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University.

Host Frank Stasio talks to Jentleson about his book and how lessons from the last century can be applied to future foreign conflicts. Jentleson is a professor of public policy and political science at Duke University. He will be at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh on Wednesday, April 25 and at The Regulator in Durham on Thursday, May 31. On Thursday, April 26, he will be speaking at the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs in New York City.

Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.
Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.