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00000177-6edd-df44-a377-6fff43070000WUNC's American Graduate Project is part of a nationwide public media conversation about the dropout crisis. We'll explore the issue through news reports, call-in programs and a forum produced with UNC-TV. Also as a part of this project we've partnered with the Durham Nativity School and YO: Durham to found the WUNC Youth Radio Club. These reports are part of American Graduate-Let’s Make it Happen!- a public media initiative to address the drop out crisis, supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and these generous funders: Project Funders:GlaxoSmithKlineThe Goodnight Educational FoundationJoseph M. Bryan Foundation State FarmThe Grable FoundationFarrington FoundationMore education stories from WUNC

Gov. McCrory Hopes To Give Schools Flexibility With Make Up Days

Gov. Pat McCrory
NC Governor's Office
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In light of the winter storm, Governor Pat McCrory says he will work with education leaders to review laws on make up days for public schools.

This week's snow storm led to closings that lasted up to three days for many schools across the state, forcing school officials to make tough decisions on how to make up for the lost time. Many schools still need to make up time from last month's snow. 

"I'm talking to my own chief legal counsel to see what authority I as governor have to allow more flexibilities in those counties that have been impacted by so many days off," he said in a news conference Friday. "I've got to ensure that I follow the law."

Under current state law, all public schools in North Carolina are required to be in session for 185 days or 1,025 hours. Most schools choose to meet the 1,025 requirement.

School districts usually build additional time in their calendars for inclement weather, but when they run out of those days, many tend to look to Saturdays or pull time from spring break.

McCrory says he'll work with State Schools Superintendent June Atkinson and Bill Cobey, chairman of the State Board of Education, to review their options.

"I want to make sure I get feedback from all education officials regarding what flexibility should be given to counties that have been impacted and what flexibility we have on the state law requiring a maximum amount of school days." he said. 

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