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In advance of the 2024 election, three Black leaders discuss politics and power in N.C.

Charles M. Blow's documentary, South to Black Power, explores the premise that a 'reverse migration' of Black Americans from the North and West to the South will increase their political power in Southern states.
HBO
Charles M. Blow's documentary, South to Black Power, explores the premise that a 'reverse migration' of Black Americans from the North and West to the South will increase their political power in Southern states.

As 2024 elections near, Due South co-host Leoneda Inge takes a close look at Black voting and campaigning in North Carolina. She speaks with Aimy Steele, founder and CEO of the New North Carolina Project, an organization committed to increasing Black and brown voter turnout across the state.

Aimy Steele at the Netroots Nation conference in 2022
The New North Carolina Project
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Twitter
Aimy Steele at the Netroots Nation conference in 2022

Then she chats with New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow about his Max documentary, South to Black Power, in which Blow travels to states throughout the South, investigating what it would take to increase Black political influence on a municipal level.

Justice Cheri Beasley at WUNC
Erin Keever/WUNC
Justice Cheri Beasley at WUNC

Former chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court Cheri Beasley also stops by the Due South studios to talk about her 2022 run for U.S. Senate.

Guests

Aimy Steele, founder and CEO of the New North Carolina Project
Charles M. Blow, author and New York Times columnist
Cheri Beasley, former chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court

Leoneda Inge is the co-host of WUNC's "Due South." Leoneda has been a radio journalist for more than 30 years, spending most of her career at WUNC as the Race and Southern Culture reporter. Leoneda’s work includes stories of race, slavery, memory and monuments. She has won "Gracie" awards, an Alfred I. duPont Award and several awards from the Radio, Television, Digital News Association (RTDNA). In 2017, Leoneda was named "Journalist of Distinction" by the National Association of Black Journalists.