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Photos: See reactions to the Roe v. Wade decision across the U.S.

Protestors outside of the supreme court.
Tyrone Turner for NPR
Protestors outside of the supreme court.

Updated June 24, 2022 at 9:11 PM ET

The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to an abortion that was guaranteed nearly 50 years ago by the decision in

Roe v. Wade.

The ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization was released Friday morning. The justices, voting 6-3 along ideological lines, sided with the Mississippi abortion law that was in question.

Reactions were mixed across the country, with anti-abortion-rights supporters celebrating what they view as a victory, and abortion-rights activists expressing their frustration over the decision. Here are some of the scenes from D.C., and across the country.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

An abortion rights activist outside the Supreme Court in D.C.
/ Tyrone Turner for NPR
/
Tyrone Turner for NPR
An abortion rights activist outside the Supreme Court in D.C.
Pro-life protesters celebrate in D.C. following the court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
/ Dee Dwyer for NPR
/
Dee Dwyer for NPR
Anti-abortion protesters celebrate in D.C. following the court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Anti-abortion activists say a prayer before the supreme court decision.
/ Tyrone Turner for NPR
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Tyrone Turner for NPR
Anti-abortion activists say a prayer before the Supreme Court decision.
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R–Ga.) at the Supreme Court.
/ Tyrone Turner for NPR
/
Tyrone Turner for NPR
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R–Ga., at the Supreme Court.
Pro-life protesters reacts to the decision of Roe vs Wade being overturned at the US Supreme Court.
/ Dee Dwyer for NPR
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Dee Dwyer for NPR
Anti-abortion activists react to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Civil rights lawyer Elizabeth White screams "no justice, no peace."
/ Tyrone Turner for NPR
/
Tyrone Turner for NPR
Civil rights lawyer Elizabeth White screams "no justice, no peace."
Anti-abortion campaigners outside the Supreme Court in D.C. on June 24.
/ Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
Anti-abortion campaigners outside the Supreme Court in D.C. on Friday.
Pro-choice protesters awaits the decision of Roe vs Wade.
/ Dee Dwyer for NPR
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Dee Dwyer for NPR
A pro-choice activist outside the Supreme Court in D.C.
A pro-choice demonstrator outside the Supreme Court on June 24, 2022.
/ Dee Dwyer for NPR
/
Dee Dwyer for NPR
An abortion rights demonstrator outside the Supreme Court on Friday.
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) speaks to abortion rights activists following the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling, in D.C. on June 24.
Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images
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Getty Images
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks to abortion rights activists following the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling, in D.C. on Friday.
Anti-abortion rights activists celebrate on June 24.
/ Tyrone Turner for NPR
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Tyrone Turner for NPR
Anti-abortion rights activists celebrate on Friday.
Tifanny Burks holds Novah Smith (2) during a protest organized by Florida Planned Parenthood after the 6-3 ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization in Miami, Fla., on June 24.
/ Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images
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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images
Tifanny Burks holds Novah Smith, 2, during a protest organized by Florida Planned Parenthood after the 6-3 ruling in the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization case in Miami, Fla., on Friday.
Linda Raymond, 64, kisses her husband Chuck Raymond, 64, both of Ellisville, while celebrating the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade on Friday, June 24, 2022, outside the Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri.
/ Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio
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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio
Linda Raymond, 64, kisses her husband Chuck Raymond, 64, after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade on June 24, outside a Planned Parenthood in St. Louis, Missouri.
Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks with reporters in front of the Massachusetts State House following the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
/ Robin Lubbock/WBUR
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Robin Lubbock/WBUR
Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks with reporters in front of the Massachusetts State House following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Rep. Cori Bush (MO-01), right, reacts after her Chief of Staff Abbas Alawieh shares news of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, after a roundtable at a Planned Parenthood in St. Louis, Missouri.
Brian Munoz / St. Louis Public Radio
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St. Louis Public Radio
Rep. Cori Bush (MO-01), right, reacts after her Chief of Staff Abbas Alawieh shares news of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, after a roundtable at a Planned Parenthood in St. Louis, Missouri.
Abortion rights demonstrators march through the streets to protest the Supreme Court's decision in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health case on June 24, 2022 in Detroit, Michigan.
/ Emily Elconin/Getty Images
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Emily Elconin/Getty Images
Abortion rights activists march in Detroit following the Supreme Court's decision in the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health case.
Thousands demonstrated in Boston on June 24, 2022, hours after the Surpreme Court of the United States overturned Roe V. Wade, eliminating the constitutional right to abortion.
/ Meredith Nierman/WGBH
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Meredith Nierman/WGBH
Thousands demonstrated in Boston on June 24, 2022, hours after the Surpreme Court of the United States overturned Roe V. Wade, eliminating the constitutional right to abortion.
Protesters stand on the statues outside of the Georgia State Capitol on June 24 to protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade. Georgia's six-week abortion ban that has been held up by a district court will likely go into effect due to the ruling.
Riley Bunch / Georgia Public Broadcasting
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Georgia Public Broadcasting
Protesters stand on the statues outside of the Georgia State Capitol on June 24 to protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade. Georgia's six-week abortion ban that has been held up by a district court will likely go into effect due to the ruling.
Protesters gather in Denver, Colorado following the supreme court decision overturning Roe v Wade.
/ Kevin Beaty/Denverite
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Kevin Beaty/Denverite
Protesters gather in Denver, Colorado following the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v Wade.
Abortion-rights protesters march through Boston on their way to a rally at the Boston Public Library.
/ Robin Lubbock/WBUR
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Robin Lubbock/WBUR
Abortion rights protesters march through Boston on their way to a rally at the Boston Public Library.
After Roe vs Wade was overturned Harriet's Wildest Dreams hold a meeting near SCOTUS before marching to the crowd.
/ Dee Dwyer for NPR
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Dee Dwyer for NPR
After Roe v. Wade was overturned, Harriet's Wildest Dreams marches for abortion rights near the Supreme Court.
After Roe vs Wad was overturned Afeni X speaks to a crowd in front of SCOTUS.
/ Dee Dwyer for NPR
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Dee Dwyer for NPR
Afeni X speaks to a crowd of abortion rights supports in front of the Supreme Court.
An aerial view of people gathered at Washington Square Park to protest against the Supreme Court's decision in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health case on June 24, 2022 in the Manhattan borough of New York City, United States.
/ Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
People gathered at Washington Square Park in New York City to protest against the Supreme Court's decision in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health case on June 24.

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Grace Widyatmadja
Grace Widyatmadja is a photo editing intern working with NPR's visuals desk and Goats & Soda.
Catie Dull
Estefania Mitre
Estefania Mitre (she/her/ella) is a production assistant for social media who works with visual elements to amplify stories across platforms. She has experience reporting on culture, social justice and music.
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