Jeff Tiberii

Capitol Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 14 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Marketplace and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with seven regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs

Ways to Connect

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Hurricane Florence is one of the most devastating weather systems to strike North Carolina. The storm's impacts will be felt for a long time, and the recovery efforts are likely to last years.

Along with damaging communities, infrastructure, and farms, the storm will have an influence on politics as well.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

North Carolinians are likely to feel the impacts of Hurricane Florence for years to come.

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii talks with Charlotte Observer Reporter Jim Morrill about the influence the storm has already had on political advertisements.

Also, praise of storm prepartaion that crossed partisan lines and the story of an out-of-place smell.

Michael Thomas removes items from his Masonsonic Lodge as flood waters from the Cape Fear River rise following Hurricane Florence in Fayetteville, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

The Cape Fear River continues to rise in Fayetteville. While flood waters in downtown receded, other parts of the city are preparing for the river to crest.

Emergency workers inspect a power line that was damaged by a tree uprooted by Hurricane Florence in Mount Olive, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Hurricane Florence has joined Fran, Floyd and Matthew as one of the worst storms to strike North Carolina. Several rivers continue to rise today, Wilmington is cut off from the rest of the state, and hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power. In other pockets of the state, people are returning home and recovery is underway.

Crews with the NYC Emergency Management perform water rescues in River Bend, N.C., after Hurricane Florence on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Courtesy of NYC Emergency Management

Updated at 4:45 p.m.

Florence has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but surges and flooding are expected to continue as it lashes South Carolina, according to the National Weather Service.

Hurricane Floyd
J. Jordan of the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Former North Carolina Governor Jim Hunt served four terms as the state's top executive and oversaw the response during some of the worst hurricanes and floods in North Carolina history.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in North Carolina politics, a federal prosecutor made a rather large records request, only to do an about face a day later. And voters also know now which referendum questions will appear on the November ballot.

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WUNC

Colleges campuses are again bustling and that means more young adults seeking mental health services.

Taylor Knopf, a reporter with NC Health News, joins WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii to discuss the increasing demand on campus, as well as efforts to try to improve upon infant mortality rates and childhood poverty in the state.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

Uncertainty and chaos continues to cloud North Carolina's upcoming election.

On Monday federal judged re-affirmed the state's U.S. House seats are illegal partisan gerrymanders, and left the door open to a possible special election.

a flooded road after Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A group of state lawmakers dusted off two seemingly controversial topics during a committee meeting Wednesday afternoon, and they promised further review and scrutiny of practices by the Governor.

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Since 1990, North Carolina's population has grown by more than 3.5 million residents.

Rebecca Tippett, founding director of Carolina Demography at the Carolina Population Center at UNC-Chapel Hill, discusses where the bulk of that growth can be found, the varying needs that follow, and how we simply consider populations may change 30 years from now.

To read more about Tippett, and her colleague's research, visit their blog.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

It has been a busy week in the world of politics with Trump's guilty allies, confederate monuments and a hasty special legislative session making the news.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, discuss the latest in the world of politics with WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

It was a neck-straining Tuesday in the world of politics.

Among the headlines were convictions for two of the president's closest confidants, a panel of judges ruling to block two North Carolina ballot questions, and more fervent debate over confederate monuments.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

The latest legal fight between the Governor and state lawmakers played out in a state court this week. At issue is whether proposals that would change the balance of powers in state government should remain on the ballot this fall.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, discuss the proposed constitutional amendments, as well as one open U.S. House race, and how the press should respond to frequent attacks from President Trump.

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WUNC

Lawsuits challenging proposed changes to the state constitution, forecasts that show one North Carolina Congressional race in a dead heat, and former governors convening to assail state lawmakers.

Even with the General Assembly and U.S. Congress out of session, plenty played out in the political world this week.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Lawmakers have retreated to their home districts following a frenetic short session.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and discuss the budget, proposed constitutional amendments, as well as what legislators did not address.

Editor's Note: This Week In NC Politics will take a break for the rest of July and will be back in early August.

 

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WUNC

This year's session at the General Assembly felt, at times, like a blur.

WRAL Capitol Bureau Chief Laura Leslie joins the podcast to discuss the pace of the Legislature, some of the most significant measures, and how policy may influence the already underway election season.

Leslie, who worked at WUNC from 2004 until 2011, also weighs in on the departure of a key legislative staffer and shares what she misses most about public radio.

Editor's Note: The WUNCPolitics Podcast will take a break for the rest of July and will be back in early August.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers have returned home following a hectic, six-week session during which they approved a state spending plan, continued an ongoing clash with the Governor, and for the most part, avoided any major controversy.

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Lawmakers are expected to send forth multiple proposed constitutional amendments in the coming days.

Jonathan Kappler, Executive Director of the NC Free Enterprise Foundation, joins the podcast to discuss the electoral effects of those possible changes. He and WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii talk about a SCOTUS redistricting punt, the passing of a UNC-system chancellor, and the best beach in NC.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

It's been a dizzying few days at the North Carolina General Assembly this week. Legislators have had multiple late nights of deliberations as they work to end the short session by the end of the month.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and discuss the debate around changing the state's early voting period, individual property rights, and budget tweaks that breezed through the chambers this week.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

It's been a frenetic week at the North Carolina General Assembly.

Legislators have had multiple late nights of deliberations as they work to end the short session by the end of the month. Among a cluttered list of issues are rape kits, individual property rights, and even raw milk.

Lauren Horsch of the NC Insider joins WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii to discuss a range of topics on the latest episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

By the time presidential candidates start descending on North Carolina in 2020, voters may be required to show a photo identification before voting. State legislators filed a proposal last week that would ask voters to decide whether a photo ID requirement should be added to the current qualifications to vote.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper vetoed a Republican-approved state spending plan this week, citing more could be done for public education.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, discuss the anticipated executive veto of the budget, as well as one farm measure that has divided some Republicans. Also this week at the North Carolina General Assembly, legislators introduced a proposal to change the state constitution and require photo identification in order to vote in-person.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Budgets, ballots and baseball are among the topics on this week's politics podcast.

WUNC Political Reporter Rusty Jacobs and Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii discuss the Governor's veto of lawmakers state spending plan, motivations behind a proposed constitutional amendment to require photo identification in order to vote, and the legends of Pedro Martinez and Bernie Williams. 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Lawmakers engaged in some heated debate during budget week at the North Carolina General Assembly.

The conversation over education funding, local earmarks, and missed opportunities carries over into this week's review of politics.

File photo of pre-school children in a classroom.
KOMUnews / Flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/7Ly92L

As state lawmakers work to quickly approve a budget, some children’s advocates are shining light on what they call a major missed opportunity for childhood development.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers are hastily advancing the state budget this week with minimal changes expected to the massive cornerstone policy document of this year’s short session.

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WUNC

Republican lawmakers are rolling out a "living wage" provision as part of the state budget.

It would apply to full-time permanent state employees, and is sure to be a stumping point on the campaign trail later this fall.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Legislators in Raleigh were touting some details about the raises state employee will receive, in advance of the full budget release next week.

Duane Hall
NC Legislature

Duane Hall stands behind a large wooden desk on the second floor of his law office in downtown Raleigh. The Governor’s Mansion is visible out the window. That’s where Hall used to shoot baskets with his friend, Governor Roy Cooper, and where he proposed to his now fiancé last December. It doesn’t feel so close anymore. These days Representative Hall is, perhaps, the loneliest man in North Carolina politics.

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