Mountain Music

photo of Alexa Rose
Courtesy of Alexa Rose

Alexa Rose was singing before she could talk, but she did not sing or even listen to country music until she was a teenager. She starred in a country-inspired musical theater production, which opened her up to the sounds of the Carter family, Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash.

Image of folklorist Joseph Hall
Courtesy of Ted Olson, ETSU

More than 4,000 people surrendered their homes and land to create the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The park covers more than 500,000 acres and straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee.

David Holt and Rhiannon Giddens during the filming of "David Holt's State of Music."
davidholt.com

  

Grammy Award winning musician David Holt moved to western North Carolina to learn "mountain music" in the early 1970s.

A picture of three banjos.
plenty.r / flickr

Fans of bluegrass music are in Raleigh this week for the World of Bluegrass Festival and conference. 

The gathering is organized by the Nashville-based International Bluegrass Music Association.  The event is part business conference, part music festival.  

Nancy Cardwell is the IBMA's Executive Director.  She said some of the world's finest musicians are in attendance, too.

    

Greensboro musician Andrew Eversole has played with the likes of bluegrass performer Laurelyn Dossett on the way to creating his second album. 

The Cumberland Ghost  is a narrative collection that tells the story of several people connected by their origins in the Appalachian Mountains.

Andrew will play during his album release party Friday night at 8:30 at Blind Tiger in Greensboro.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Andrew Eversole about the story of The Cumberland Ghost.

VanderVeen Photographers

Beowulf is a classic tale that has been told and retold in many ways. But in 2006, a team in Greensboro designed a surprising twist on the age-old tale: a music-filled play set in Appalachia.