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Preserving The History Of Black Excellence In Raleigh

Oberlin Village is an important part of Raleigh’s history — but there is not much of the historic African American community left.

It was founded by former slaves around 1870 as one of the first freedmen communities in the city. In just a decade, Oberlin Village had grown to up to 1,000 residents. For years it was a thriving community made up of carpenters, brick masons and seamstresses. Since the 1940s, Increased development in Raleigh has razed over most of the landscape of Oberlin Village. Preservation North Carolina has rescued two homes from the community and preserved them. They commissioned playwright Howard Craft to create a new production to celebrate the community. It is called “Bending the Arc: Willis Graves Jr. and the Pursuit of Justice.”

Host Frank Stasio talks to Craft about the play and the role that Oberlin Village played in shaping civil rights leaders. Then Brandi Neuwirth joins the conversation to share the history of Latta University, a school and orphanage based in Oberlin Village. Neuwirth is the great-great-granddaughter of the founder of Latta University and the chair of the Latta House Foundation, working with Friends of Oberlin and others to preserve history. Craft’s play will be read as part of a two-day symposium hosted by Preservation North Carolina, on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 2:30 p.m. at Shaw University in Raleigh.

Amanda Magnus grew up in Maryland and went to high school in Baltimore. She became interested in radio after an elective course in the NYU journalism department. She got her start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio, but she knew public radio was for her when she interned at WNYC. She later moved to Madison, where she worked at Wisconsin Public Radio for six years. In her time there, she helped create an afternoon drive news magazine show, called Central Time. She also produced several series, including one on Native American life in Wisconsin. She spends her free time running, hiking, and roller skating. She also loves scary movies.
Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.