Grant Holub-Moorman

Producer, "The State of Things"

Grant Holub-Moorman is a producer for The State of Things, WUNC's daily, live talk show that features the issues, personalities and places of North Carolina.

Grant was raised in Chapel Hill, immersed in the lower FM frequencies. He was offered a warm welcome into the studio by WCOM (Carrboro) and, from there, the waves started carrying him outward, to engineering at WPTF (Raleigh), producing at WBUR (Boston), and serving as program director at the Yurt Radio at Hampshire College, where he studied International Development. 

He enjoys collecting and creatively producing oral histories with the Museum of Durham History, Los Campesinos Ecólogicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas, and other institutions. For this work, he received the audience choice award at the Southern Oral History Program’s annual Sonic South competition for his piece "She Knows: Race and Reproductive Justice in NC."

If not with The Radio, one may find Grant climbing magnolias, dancing, or paddling the Eno or Haw.

Send him a pitch if you have a show idea related to gut science, barter economics or internet games popular 2006-2012.

Press Photo of Nicole Byer
Courtesy of Nicole Byer

If you're an aspiring culinary artist, there are plenty of shows to watch for inspiration — “Chopped,” “Master Chef” and “The Great British Bake Off” let viewers watch kitchen magic unfold. But Nicole Byer's Emmy-nominated series "Nailed It" is gaining traction for turning the premise of cooking competitions on its head. Instead of dishing up exquisite treats, its inexperienced competitors fail spectacularly.

Wayne Lawrence / ProPublica

For generations, Black landowners in the South relied on informal agreements, instead of wills, to keep property in the family. In a new article from investigative news outlet ProPublica, reporter Lizzie Presser investigated the story of a Carteret County family’s land loss and how African Americans across the country lost about 90% of their farmland between 1910 and 1997. Host Anita Rao talks with Lizzie Presser about the political, economic and emotional cost of black landholders losing their family property.

Vidal draws upon the traditions of Samba Reggae in his musical style.
Courtesy of Caique Vidal

Caique Vidal’s voice is robust and unequivocal over driving percussion and horn sections. In harmony with his band Batuque, the sound is rambunctious yet precise. The melodies spiral until you smile, and dancing feels required.

Edited image via Wikivisual/ Creative Commons

What do North Carolina students learn in school about the birds and the bees and what should they learn? At local school board meetings and at the state Capitol, parents, government officials and advocacy groups all vie for control over curriculum and funding.

BOB FITCH PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVE / STANFORD LIBRARIES

Recently-released FBI files on Martin Luther King Jr. put his extramarital affairs back into the limelight. But a woman named Dorothy Cotton, who many only know as King’s “other wife,” deserves much more than the label of mistress, according to scholar Jason Miller, professor of English at North Carolina State University. She is a native of Goldsboro, North Carolina whose commitment to grassroots organizing led her from serving as a housekeeper to becoming the only female director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). She was charged with running the SCLC's education initiative, the Citizenship Education Program. Two years before her death in 2018, Cotton sat down for an extended interview with Miller.

 

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