Movies

A black and white photo of the cast of The Wizard of Oz in costume.
Library of Congress

Somewhere over the rainbow, The State of Things is celebrating the 80th anniversary of the film adaptation of “The Wizard of Oz.” The 1939 movie is best known for its hit musical numbers, fantastical plotline and use of Technicolor. Judy Garland’s career took off after she portrayed Dorothy Gale on her journey through the magical land of Oz, and the film has since become an American cultural touchstone.

Image of popcorn
Creative Commons / pxhere

Greensboro will pilot its first sensory-friendly movie night this Friday. The goal is to be more inclusive of people with certain needs.

poster of avengers
Marvel

Superhero movies can be a massive money maker for Hollywood. Marvel movies, in particular, continue to break their own records, including the latest “Avengers: End Game,” which raked in more than $1 billion dollars globally opening weekend.

"No amount of money ever bought a second of time," says Tony "Iron Man" Stark, patient zero of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, midway through the new Avengers: Endgame.

komersreal / Creative Commons https://bit.ly/1AHpDp0

We’re going to make you an offer you can’t refuse. The State of Things wants to know about your favorite gangster, mafia, and mob movies for the next edition of Movies On The Radio.

Awards season is in full bloom. The Golden Globes, Screen Actors Guild Awards and The Oscars all consider “A Star is Born” and “Black Panther” among the best films of 2018.

Favorite Movie Of 2018

Jan 8, 2019
poster photo of A Star is Born
courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

The Screen Actors Guild Award nominations are in! “A Star is Born” and “Black Panther” are among the films that will battle it out for best picture. But who cares what SAG thinks? For our next Movies On The Radio, we want your favorite movie of 2018.

'Young Frankenstein' poster
Matthew Nenninger & Tracie Andrews / Creative Commons https://bit.ly/2P9H7Ja

Most horror movies are meant to be spooky and scary...but bad acting or cheap special effects can turn a terrifying tale into campy one. The classic example is “Evil Dead” or a B movie like “Plan 9 From Outer Space.”

Some films blend horror with humor, two genres that some would call opposites. “Shaun of the Dead” and “Young Frankenstein” are two well-known comedy-horror movies.

Touchstone Pictures

Good cinema takes you out of your living room and transports you miles, eons, and even worlds away. And like a good book, the best films can leave you with a deep desire to meet those characters, or even live life for a day in their magical worlds. Think about living out supernatural fantasies within the walls of Hogwarts, hunting an elusive jaguar shark alongside your quirky buddies in a Wes Anderson film, or dodging bullets as a super-human cybercriminal in “The Matrix.”

 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show on a theater marquee.
Mark Miller (CC-BY-SA)

 

“The Rocky Horror Picture Show” spurred one of the biggest cult movies phenomenons. But the sci-fi musical mashup did not impress at the box office when it opened in 1975. In fact, a Halloween show in New York City and a national rollout of the film was canceled due to terrible reviews. Decades later, the film has been running continuously in movie theaters for longer than any other movie — with many of the showings happening at midnight on weekends.

A promotional poster for the 1959 Douglas Sirk film 'Imitation of Life'
Reynold Brown

This year US consumers are estimated to have spent an average of $180 each for Mother’s Day, according to the National Retail Federation. This month Movies on the Radio gives moms a tribute money can not buy with a show devoted to mothers.

Still from 'Lady and the Tramp'
Cozinhando Fantasias / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/kELGJv

Animation has come a long way, from the hand-painted drawings of The Walt Disney Company’s 1937 feature film “Snow White” to today’s dazzling computer-generated imagery. 

Image of two best friends
Flickr/ Stuart Seeger

Best friends are the constant in many people's lives. They rescue each other when a car breaks down. They join go on late-night quests for fast food. And they console and support each other in a time of need. The relationships of best friends have been fodder for movie plot lines for decades and exist in all genres.

arianta / Flickr

A well-executed remake film can bring a beloved story to a fresh audience. But when a remake is done wrong, it can leave faithful viewers cringing.

For the next Movies On The Radio, The State of Things wants to know what are the best and worst remake films? 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite movie about politics? 

Do you like the classics, such as “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” or "The Manchurian Candidate?"  Did you enjoy Julianne Moore’s performance as Sarah Palin in “Game Change” or were you charmed by Kevin Kline in the rom-com "Dave?"   Film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will examine how movies depict politicians and government and discuss memorable scenes from political movies through the ages.

Screenshot from Zootopia
BagoGames / Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to The Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. Though no animal has ever won an Oscar, viewers have embraced animal actors and characters in film.

photo from "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Moni3 [Public Domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Most movies are sources of adventure and excitement, but some films can also be a source of temptation. Whether a movie was off-limits by your parents or banned by the church, a forbidden film can often be all the more enticing to watch. Maybe your parents thought the dinosaur eating a man off the toilet in "Jurassic Park" was too violent, or that "To Kill a Mockingbird" talked about taboo topics.

This month's edition of 'Movies on the Radio' looks at movies about food or movies with food scenes.
Eric McGregor / Flickr Creative Commons

Chefs are fond of saying "we eat with our eyes," but that phrase takes on a whole new meaning when it comes to movies about food.

Films like the classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" or Stanley Tucci's "Big Night" have had stomachs rumbling for decades. But more recent movies like the animated "Ratatouille" or Jon Favreau's "Chef" have also been material for aspiring chefs and foodies. 

Paul Smith

Peyton Reed fell in love with movies after watching the original “Planet of the Apes” as a child. He grew up in Raleigh and dedicated his teen years to film production.

He studied film at UNC-Chapel Hill and soon moved to Los Angeles to jump start his career. But it took Reed years to work his way into the directing ranks.

Image of Sandra Bullock accepting a Golden Raspberry award in 2010 for worst actress.
Shari B. Ellis / Flickr Creative Commons

A "bad" movie can ruin a night out, or it can secretly be your favorite source of entertainment for a night in.

We all have movies that we would rather not admit we enjoy, but sometimes we cannot stop ourselves from loving corny one-liners or ridiculous action scenes.

They are on the shelf marked "Guilty Pleasures." 

Bastard Film Encounter

Apr 22, 2015
Bastard Film Encounter 2015
Bastard Film Encounter

  Romantic comedy, horror, and documentary are all genres of films found on Netflix that provide neat boxes for categorization. But what about the films that don’t fit squarely into a category? 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Skip Elsheimer, co-organizer of the Bastard Film Encounter which brings archivists and film enthusiasts together to discuss forgotten, misplaced and awkward films.

Logo for the RiverRun International Film Festival
riverrunfilm.com

The 17th annual RiverRun International Film Festival returns to Winston-Salem this month. 

Casablanca Kiss
Wikipedia

There can be no doubt Hollywood loves the kiss. New York Times film critic A.O. Scott examines the history of lip-locking on the silver screen in his recent piece, A Brief History of Kissing in The Movies.

Varsity Theatre marquis
The Varsity Theatre

Update Monday 11:44 a.m.:

The Varsity Theatre has successfully made their goal to buy a new digital projector, and they still have 26 days to go in their Kickstarter campaign #GoDigitalOrGoDark. The building houses two theaters, but to try to keep the goal attainable, organizers asked for enough money to convert one to digital. Any additional funds raised in the final days of the campaign will go toward updating the second, larger theater.

A new movie set in Western North Carolina opens in select theaters this weekend. The World Made Straight is based on a novel by North Carolina native Ron Rash.  It follows a legacy of violence dating back to the Civil War. 

The main character, Travis Shelton, is seventeen when he discovers a grove of marijuana in the woods ... and then he steps into the jaws of a bear trap. Injured, he is discovered by the pot farmer who set the trap, Carlton Toomey.

Langston Hughes
Wikipedia

This show is a rebroadcast from December 23, 2013 

  Originally a play by poet Langston Hughes, Black Nativity made its contemporary debut on the big screen. The film follows a teenager who travels to Harlem to spend the holidays with his estranged relatives.  Executive producer Joy Goodwin is a professor of creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Goodwin about Black Nativity

The original poster for Dirty Dancing, which was filmed in North Carolina.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dirty-dancing.jpg

From The Last of the Mohicans to Dirty Dancing and Days of Thunder, movies made in North Carolina have gone on to great box office success. 

Meet Me In St. Louis
Wikipedia

Since the transition from silent films in the 1920s, the musical has been a staple of the movie industry. Some of the cinema’s biggest hits include song and dance.  From Singing in the Rain to Grease, host Frank Stasio looks at musicals at the movies with North Carolina University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes.

Image of Superman
Flickr/Nicholas Rumas

When you were a child, did you imagine being Superman? 

Wikimedia

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show from Tuesday, March 18, 2014.

For many, The Wizard of Oz is a happy tale of Dorothy and her little dog Toto skipping along the yellow brick road.

But for some, the Wicked Witch and the flying monkeys were the visions of nightmares.

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