Confederate Monuments

A massive pile of debris sits outside of town on Ocracoke Island as cleanup efforts continue a month after Hurricane Dorian. All of the waste must be collected and then loaded into trucks before being transported off the island by boat.
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

As the year comes to a close, we take a look at some of the photos that helped tell the story of 2019. From hurricanes to controversy over confederate monuments and a deadly gas explosion, here are the moments – big and small – that shaped the year in North Carolina news.

Silent Sam monument on UNC Chapel Hill's Campus
Matt Couch / WUNC

The University of North Carolina Board of Governors violated the state's open meetings laws by secretly negotiating and approving a deal to dispose of a Confederate monument from the campus of the system's flagship school, according to a lawsuit filed by a student newspaper.

Silent Sam on UNC-Chapel Hill's campus is a controversial Confederate symbol.
Don McCullough / Flickr Creative Commons

Updated at 2:45 p.m.

A Superior Court judge will reconsider the $2.5 million settlement between the UNC System and the Sons of Confederate Veterans. The judge's decision today was a small victory for the UNC Chapel Hill students and professor who sought to overturn the settlement.

Confederate Flag, Orange County, Silent Sam
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The University of North Carolina System agreed to give the state chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans $74,999 in exchange for the group keeping Confederate symbols off public university campuses.

The statue before activists toppled it.
Don McCullough / flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/fvHbD4

New documents released from the University of North Carolina System reveal some of what happened behind closed doors as UNC Board of Governors negotiated its $2.5 million settlement with the North Carolina Sons of Confederate Veterans over the controversial Silent Sam statue.

Opinion: A Lawful And Lasting Path That Ensures The Monument Never Returns To Campus.

Dec 16, 2019
Silent Sam Confederate memorial at UNC Chapel Hill
Don McCullough / flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/fvHbD4

This opinion letter was written by University of North Carolina System Board of Governors members Jim Holmes, Darrell Allison, Wendy Murphy, Anna Nelson & Bob Rucho. It first appeared in The News & Observer. 

Liz Schlemmer

UNC-Chapel Hill students demonstrated in the rain outside a nearly empty board room Friday to show their discontent with the UNC System Board of Governors’ decision to give a neo-Confederate group $2.5 million to preserve the Silent Sam monument. None of the members of the Board of Governors were physically present at their December meeting to hear the students’ chants.

The pedestal of the Silent Sam statue without the Confederate monument on Tuesday, August 21, 2018.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

  A national civil rights group has warned the leaders of the University of North Carolina that they should reconsider a $2.5 million settlement involving a statue of a Confederate soldier that protesters toppled last year at the system’s flagship campus.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faced criticism this week for its decision to pay the Sons of Confederate Veterans $2.5 million, and hand over the Confederate monument Silent Sam which was erected during the Jim Crow era and loomed over the school’s campus until it was toppled in August, 2018.

Will Michaels / WUNC

The University of North Carolina Board of Governors is giving the state chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans $2.5 million to preserve a Confederate monument that once stood on the campus of UNC Chapel Hill.

Sign in front of the confederate monument Silent Sam that reads, 'HANDS OFF SAM.'
Jason DeBruyn / WUNC

The North Carolina Sons of Confederate Veterans are now the official owners of the controversial Silent Sam statue that once stood on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill.

Chatham Confederate Monument
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by the United Daughters of the Confederacy that sought to re-erect a Confederate monument in Chatham County. The statue was removed last month from its home in front of Pittsboro's historic courthouse. 

Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A North Carolina county removed a Confederate statue from a historic courthouse early Wednesday, joining the handful of places around the state where such monuments have come down in recent years despite a law protecting them.

Chatham Confederate Monument
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Traffic moved slowly but orderly through Pittsboro, in Chatham County, on a recent day. Karen Howard, the driver, reached the traffic circle that can't be avoided. It's the circle around the Old Chatham courthouse.

A Confederate soldiers monument outside the Old Chatham County Courthouse. in Pittsboro, N.C.
Hilary Perez / NC Department of Natural Resources

A Confederate statue in Pittsboro will stay where it is despite today's deadline set by Chatham County commissioners to begin the process of moving it. 

A Confederate soldiers monument outside the Old Chatham County Courthouse. in Pittsboro, N.C.
Hilary Perez / NC Department of Natural Resources

Commissioners in North Carolina say the United Daughters of the Confederacy must soon come up with a plan for removing a Confederate monument from a county courthouse's grounds.

The base of the Silent Sam statue stands surrounding by a fence.
Alex Foyler

The future of Silent Sam still remains uncertain. The Confederate statue has been stored in a secret location since its toppling last fall, and the UNC System Board of Governors has indefinitely postponed making a decision about its future.

NCCU, HBCU, Confederate Monument, North Carolina Central University
Leoneda Inge

North Carolina Central University officially unveiled the new name of its administration building Wednesday. The name of former North Carolina governor, Clyde Hoey, a known segregationist, is no longer on the building at the historically black institution.

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Police have arrested two people they say defaced a Confederate monument in Raleigh.  The arrests were made Sunday during a protest at the North Carolina Women of the Confederacy monument near the statehouse.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Gov. Roy Cooper appointed Court of Appeals Judge Mark Davis to the North Carolina Supreme Court. Davis succeeds Cheri Beasley who last month became the first African-American woman to serve as a supreme court justice for the state.

Tom Foreman Jr. / AP Photo

11:25 a.m.

Workers in North Carolina have removed a statue of a Confederate soldier by lifting it off its base with a crane.

Image from Jon WIlliams' Twitter feed. He has been charged with littering.
Jon Williams / Twitter

Authorities have accused a man of placing white hoods on a Confederate statue depicting a woman and a young boy on the grounds of North Carolina's Capitol.

Courtesy of Keri Brown

Winston-Salem appears to be moving forward with the removal of a Confederate monument in the city. The statue’s contested ownership is complicating attempts to remove it. The United Daughters of the Confederacy has requested an injunction to prevent the city from moving the Confederate monument. 

Graduate student Lindsay Ayling speaks to a couple dozens activists about outgoing Chancellor Carol Folt's decision to remove the Silent Sam pedestal from campus.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt will leave her post at the end of the month. In a university wide email on Monday, she first announced she would leave this spring. But after the UNC Board of Governors called an emergency meeting, the board moved up her resignation to January 31.

Folt’s tenure came amidst an ongoing battle over Silent Sam, the Confederate monument in McCorkle Place that was torn down by protesters in August. 

The Confederate soldier statue sits on private property at the former Forsyth County Courthouse.
Keri Brown / WFDD

The icy weather didn’t keep away supporters and protesters of the Confederate monument in downtown Winston-Salem Sunday. The city has ordered the United Daughters of the Confederacy to remove it by the end of the month.

The 50 West Fourth site. The statue has been in this location since 1905.
Emily McCord / WFDD

The owner of a former courthouse building in Winston-Salem where a Confederate statue sits is asking for its removal. This is in line with the wishes of the city.

Durham County officials remove the Confederate statue that was pulled off its post by protestors.
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

Updated 1:20 p.m.

A North Carolina county where protesters tore down a Confederate monument proposed Tuesday to return the crumpled statue to public view inside a local government building, the latest effort in the state to deal with monuments that many decry as racist symbols.

A North Carolina city has told the owner of a recently vandalized Confederate monument to remove it by Jan. 31 or face a possible lawsuit.

Silent Sam on UNC-Chapel Hill's campus is a controversial Confederate symbol.
Don McCullough / Flickr Creative Commons

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Board of Trustees issued their recommendation Monday for the future of the confederate Silent Sam monument. The board wants to see the statue housed in a $5.3M history center on south campus. The news prompted protest among the students and faculty on campus who do not want the statue re-erected on any part of the campus.

Don McCullough / Flickr Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/p/fvhbd4

By November 15, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt and the school's Board of Trustees will present their plan for the future of the Confederate Silent Sam monument that was topped by protestors in late August. The statue is currently being stored at an undisclosed location.

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