Confederate Monuments

Sign in front of the confederate monument Silent Sam that reads, 'HANDS OFF SAM.'
Jason DeBruyn / WUNC

The North Carolina Sons of Confederate Veterans are now the official owners of the controversial Silent Sam statue that once stood on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill.

Chatham Confederate Monument
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by the United Daughters of the Confederacy that sought to re-erect a Confederate monument in Chatham County. The statue was removed last month from its home in front of Pittsboro's historic courthouse. 

Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A North Carolina county removed a Confederate statue from a historic courthouse early Wednesday, joining the handful of places around the state where such monuments have come down in recent years despite a law protecting them.

Chatham Confederate Monument
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Traffic moved slowly but orderly through Pittsboro, in Chatham County, on a recent day. Karen Howard, the driver, reached the traffic circle that can't be avoided. It's the circle around the Old Chatham courthouse.

A Confederate soldiers monument outside the Old Chatham County Courthouse. in Pittsboro, N.C.
Hilary Perez / NC Department of Natural Resources

A Confederate statue in Pittsboro will stay where it is despite today's deadline set by Chatham County commissioners to begin the process of moving it. 

A Confederate soldiers monument outside the Old Chatham County Courthouse. in Pittsboro, N.C.
Hilary Perez / NC Department of Natural Resources

Commissioners in North Carolina say the United Daughters of the Confederacy must soon come up with a plan for removing a Confederate monument from a county courthouse's grounds.

The base of the Silent Sam statue stands surrounding by a fence.
Alex Foyler

The future of Silent Sam still remains uncertain. The Confederate statue has been stored in a secret location since its toppling last fall, and the UNC System Board of Governors has indefinitely postponed making a decision about its future.

NCCU, HBCU, Confederate Monument, North Carolina Central University
Leoneda Inge

North Carolina Central University officially unveiled the new name of its administration building Wednesday. The name of former North Carolina governor, Clyde Hoey, a known segregationist, is no longer on the building at the historically black institution.

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Police have arrested two people they say defaced a Confederate monument in Raleigh.  The arrests were made Sunday during a protest at the North Carolina Women of the Confederacy monument near the statehouse.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Gov. Roy Cooper appointed Court of Appeals Judge Mark Davis to the North Carolina Supreme Court. Davis succeeds Cheri Beasley who last month became the first African-American woman to serve as a supreme court justice for the state.

Tom Foreman Jr. / AP Photo

11:25 a.m.

Workers in North Carolina have removed a statue of a Confederate soldier by lifting it off its base with a crane.

Image from Jon WIlliams' Twitter feed. He has been charged with littering.
Jon Williams / Twitter

Authorities have accused a man of placing white hoods on a Confederate statue depicting a woman and a young boy on the grounds of North Carolina's Capitol.

Courtesy of Keri Brown

Winston-Salem appears to be moving forward with the removal of a Confederate monument in the city. The statue’s contested ownership is complicating attempts to remove it. The United Daughters of the Confederacy has requested an injunction to prevent the city from moving the Confederate monument. 

Graduate student Lindsay Ayling speaks to a couple dozens activists about outgoing Chancellor Carol Folt's decision to remove the Silent Sam pedestal from campus.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt will leave her post at the end of the month. In a university wide email on Monday, she first announced she would leave this spring. But after the UNC Board of Governors called an emergency meeting, the board moved up her resignation to January 31.

Folt’s tenure came amidst an ongoing battle over Silent Sam, the Confederate monument in McCorkle Place that was torn down by protesters in August. 

The Confederate soldier statue sits on private property at the former Forsyth County Courthouse.
Keri Brown / WFDD

The icy weather didn’t keep away supporters and protesters of the Confederate monument in downtown Winston-Salem Sunday. The city has ordered the United Daughters of the Confederacy to remove it by the end of the month.

The 50 West Fourth site. The statue has been in this location since 1905.
Emily McCord / WFDD

The owner of a former courthouse building in Winston-Salem where a Confederate statue sits is asking for its removal. This is in line with the wishes of the city.

Durham County officials remove the Confederate statue that was pulled off its post by protestors.
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

Updated 1:20 p.m.

A North Carolina county where protesters tore down a Confederate monument proposed Tuesday to return the crumpled statue to public view inside a local government building, the latest effort in the state to deal with monuments that many decry as racist symbols.

A North Carolina city has told the owner of a recently vandalized Confederate monument to remove it by Jan. 31 or face a possible lawsuit.

Silent Sam on UNC-Chapel Hill's campus is a controversial Confederate symbol.
Don McCullough / Flickr Creative Commons

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Board of Trustees issued their recommendation Monday for the future of the confederate Silent Sam monument. The board wants to see the statue housed in a $5.3M history center on south campus. The news prompted protest among the students and faculty on campus who do not want the statue re-erected on any part of the campus.

Don McCullough / Flickr Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/p/fvhbd4

By November 15, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt and the school's Board of Trustees will present their plan for the future of the Confederate Silent Sam monument that was topped by protestors in late August. The statue is currently being stored at an undisclosed location.

File photo of Maya Little, a UNC graduate student arrested at a Silent Sam rally earlier this year.
Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

Activists and students who support the toppling of the Confederate Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill say they have been abused and assaulted by police. Pepper spray was used at one of the last demonstrations to disperse a crowd.

The pedestal of the Silent Sam statue without the Confederate monument on Tuesday, August 21, 2018.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

The protesters who brought down a Confederate statue at North Carolina's flagship university acted with "a righteous show of people power" after university leaders refused to remove it, one of those accused in the demonstration said Thursday.

Deciding Not To Decide On Silent Sam

Aug 29, 2018
Elizabeth Baier/WUNC

The Confederate statue Silent Sam, which stood on University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s campus since 1913, was toppled last week. On Tuesday the UNC Board of Governors held a nearly five-hour meeting, conducted almost exclusively behind closed doors, to decide what to do with the controversial statue.

Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

Silent Sam may no longer be standing on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus, but activist Maya Little says the fight is far from over. 

Silent Sam, UNC, Duke Chapel, Confederate Monuments
Leoneda Inge

Two prominent universities have removed Confederate statues on their campuses – but in very different ways – as campuses grapple with race and relics of the past.

Gerry Broome / AP Photo

Silent Sam fell to the ground Monday night, breaking through the dirt around its pedestal. Protesters cheered, and police, for the most part, looked on as protesters kicked the statue and captured photos of the controversial Confederate symbol. 

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Updated 12:05 p.m. | August 22, 2018

The North Carolina historical commission has agreed to keep three Confederate monuments on Capitol grounds.

Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

Silent Sam, the controversial confederate monument that stood on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s campus is gone.

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

A North Carolina committee tasked with deciding the fate of three prominent Confederate monuments now located at the State Capitol grounds will announce its plan next week.

National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings,
Brynn Anderson / AP

It’s hard to count the exact number of African Americans who were lynched by white mobs during the years following slavery. Numbers show most of these brutal, deadly acts occurred in the South, between the 1870s and the 1950s.

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