Health Services Lead Debbie Hayden, RN consults with mother Jaquana regarding care for her one-year-old Aliyah, while at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Friday Center on September 17, 2018.
Daniel Cima / American Red Cross

Fatigue, Frustration Settle In For Hurricane Evacuees Still Waiting to Return Home

As flood waters subside, Carteret County has been sending buses to shelters to bring home evacuees displaced by Hurricane Florence. Many of those evacuees have been staying at a megashelter in Chapel Hill since the storm made landfall last week.

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Sen. Claire McCaskill: 'I Will Vote No On Judge Kavanaugh'

Sen. Claire McCaskill says she will vote against Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, but the Missouri Democrat, who is facing re-election in November, says it is not because of allegations of sexual misconduct swirling around the nominee. In a statement posted to Twitter on Wednesday, McCaskill says the allegations made by Christine Blasey Ford — the professor who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when the two were teenagers — are "troubling" and need to be examined....

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Thea remains of Sutton Plant's two smokestacks stand over the demolished boiler and coal silos.
Duke Energy

Duke Energy said Saturday night that heavy rains from Florence caused a slope to collapse at a coal-ash landfill at a closed power station near the North Carolina coast.

 Rescue team member Sgt. Nick Muhar, from the North Carolina National Guard 1/120th battalion, evacuates a young child as the rising floodwaters from Hurricane Florence threatens his home in New Bern, N.C., on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Chris Seward / AP

An ominous tweet appeared on a historic North Carolina community's Twitter feed about 2 a.m. Friday.

It came as rivers swelled, tides crested and the rain wouldn't stop. And that's when people found themselves trapped in their homes as the water rose.

 An American flag lays on a table in the old town hall which sits damaged from Hurricane Matthew's flooding two years ago in Nichols, S.C., Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

The torrential rains from Florence will test South Carolina's infrastructure, which failed under historic flooding in 2015.

Russ Lewis covers his eyes from a gust of wind and a blast of sand as Hurricane Florence approaches Myrtle Beach, S.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

UPDATED 6 P.M.

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has confirmed additional deaths related to Hurricane Florrence.

Vehicles drive through water from the White Oak River flooding Highway 24 as Hurricane Florence hit Swansboro N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Tom Copeland / AP Photo

North Carolina is feeling the effects of Hurricane Florence. The major storm is expected to cause catastrophic flooding and long power outages. Host Frank Stasio talks to WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and WUNC politics reporter Rusty Jacobs for the latest from the governor and on state response.

Crews with the NYC Emergency Management perform water rescues in River Bend, N.C., after Hurricane Florence on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Courtesy of NYC Emergency Management

Updated at 4:45 p.m.

Florence has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but surges and flooding are expected to continue as it lashes South Carolina, according to the National Weather Service.

Sand bags surround homes on North Topsail Beach, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, as Hurricane Florence threatens the coast.
Chuck Burton / AP

Updated 5 p.m. | Sept. 13, 2018

Hurricane Florence's leading edge battered the Carolina coast Thursday, bending trees and shooting frothy sea water over streets on the Outer Banks, as the hulking storm closed in with 105 mph (165 kph) winds for a drenching siege that could last all weekend.

A picture of a patient and a doctor meeting over a web connection.
Cisco Systems

Dealing with a sick child or a minor ailment can be especially tough while waiting out a storm. UNC Healthcare has a solution for anyone in North Carolina who needs to consult a doctor for minor issues as Hurricane Florence hits the state.

AP Photo/Chuck Burton

Hurricane Florence, which is now a Category 2 storm, continues to bear down on the Carolina coast. The National Weather Service says it is likely to be “the storm of a lifetime” for certain portions of that coastline. Officials have ordered the evacuation of over 1 million people from the coasts of North and South Carolina. Scott Sharp, a senior forecaster with the National Weather Service in Raleigh speaks with host Frank Stasio with the latest report.

A Duke Energy worker restores power after a storm.
Duke Energy

Duke Energy predicted as many as 3 million customers across North and South Carolina could lose power as a results of Hurricane Florence. In response it will deploy 20,000 workers – a service area record – to restore power.

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The North Carolina National Guard was deployed to help in the fight against Florence.
NC National Guard

On The Ground In Wilmington After Florence

North Carolina is still reeling from Hurricane Florence. The death toll from the storm rose to at least 37 people in three different states Tuesday, with 27 fatalities in North Carolina. There are roughly 10,000 people still in shelters. Governor Roy Cooper urged those who evacuated to stay put.

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14 NC Community Colleges Remain Closed After Florence

59 minutes ago
Aerial view of Wayne Community College campus
North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees

Fourteen campuses in the North Carolina Community College system remain closed in Eastern North Carolina as officials assess storm damage in the wake of Hurricane Florence.

Scotland High School in Laurinburg, North Carolina flooded as rivers rose from Hurricane Florence's massive rainfall. A tributary to the Leith Creek runs across the school's property.
Courtesy of Scotland County Schools

Schools across the southeastern part of the state remained closed this week as administrators begin to assess the damage from Hurricane Florence.

The University of North Carolina At Chapel Hill

American universities are designed to educate students while also responding to a public need. The research and innovation that stems from those schools is meant to lift up communities and the nation as a whole.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

Updated 2:46 p.m. | Sept. 12, 2018

Durham and Wake County school officials have announced they will close schools Thursday instead of dismissing students early, as had previously been announced. The decision follows parental concerns that an early dismissal would mean students are departing school just as hurricane-related weather is forecast to hit the Triangle.

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