Health Services Lead Debbie Hayden, RN consults with mother Jaquana regarding care for her one-year-old Aliyah, while at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Friday Center on September 17, 2018.
Daniel Cima / American Red Cross

Fatigue, Frustration Settle In For Hurricane Evacuees Still Waiting to Return Home

As flood waters subside, Carteret County has been sending buses to shelters to bring home evacuees displaced by Hurricane Florence. Many of those evacuees have been staying at a megashelter in Chapel Hill since the storm made landfall last week.

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Sen. Claire McCaskill: 'I Will Vote No On Judge Kavanaugh'

Sen. Claire McCaskill says she will vote against Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, but the Missouri Democrat, who is facing re-election in November, says it is not because of allegations of sexual misconduct swirling around the nominee. In a statement posted to Twitter on Wednesday, McCaskill says the allegations made by Christine Blasey Ford — the professor who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when the two were teenagers — are "troubling" and need to be examined....

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Neighbors in a small, unnamed neighborhood on the southern edge of Lumberton. came back to make a first check of their homes on Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. They
Jay Price / WUNC

It finally stopped raining in Robeson County on Monday. It will be days before the water drains away and the real cleanup can begin. But some evacuees took advantage of the break in the weather to venture back to their flooded neighborhoods to try to at least assess the damage.

Beatriz Jerlen Covarrubias-Rivera relaxes on a Red Cross cot with her four sons, ages 2 to 10, while staying at a shelter operated by the Red Cross at E.B. Aycock Middle School on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018.
Adam Jennings / American Red Cross

Governor Roy Cooper is reminding North Carolinians to find a safe place to stay as torrential rain and flooding continues to pummel parts of the state. For some, that safe place to stay may be another night at a shelter far away from home, like the UNC shelter in Chapel Hill.

6 Ways To Help Hurricane Florence Relief Efforts

Sep 17, 2018
People gather outside Knightdale High School, which has been converted to an evacuation shelter for those affected by Hurricane Florence in Kinghtdale, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Since Hurricane Florence made landfall on Friday, at least 14,000 people have sought refuge in more than 110 shelters across North Carolina. Governor Roy Cooper urged evacuees to stay in shelters and delay returning to their homes.

Linda Rupert

Tropical Depression Florence is well inland, but North Carolina is still reeling from the storm. All of the state’s 100 counties have experienced some form of National Weather System alert, from flash flood watch to hazardous weather outlook.

 In a two-hour special broadcast to stations around North Carolina, The State of Things speaks with residents, journalists, officials and experts about the devastating storm impact. 

John Howie Jr.'s new album is 'Not Tonight'
(John Howie Jr. photo by Kevin Clark)

Misery and heartbreak make a good country song. Multiply that weeping and twang by eleven and you get John Howie Jr.'s latest "Not Tonight". (The album features eleven cuts. Cuts might be the operative word here.)

"Not Tonight" is set for release on September 21, 2018.  You can get an exclusive preview of it here.

Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence inundate the town of Trenton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018.
Steve Helber / AP

Catastrophic flooding from Florence spread across the Carolinas this weekend, with roads to Wilmington cut off by the epic deluge and muddy river water swamping entire neighborhoods miles inland.

Here's what a flash flood looks like. It's midday Sunday here on US 74 Business in Whiteville in Columbia County, where rising waters from a swamp are rushing over the road. A swift water rescue team from Illinois is here with several trucks and a boat, trying to get east to help out with the storm.

Emergency workers inspect a power line that was damaged by a tree uprooted by Hurricane Florence in Mount Olive, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Hurricane Florence has joined Fran, Floyd and Matthew as one of the worst storms to strike North Carolina. Several rivers continue to rise today, Wilmington is cut off from the rest of the state, and hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power. In other pockets of the state, people are returning home and recovery is underway.

Rising flood waters brought on by Hurricane Florence threaten a building off highway 70 in Goldsboro, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

With Wilmington cut off from the rest of North Carolina by still-rising floodwaters from Florence, officials plan to airlift food and water to the city of nearly 120,000 people as rescuers elsewhere pull inland residents from homes swamped by swollen rivers.

Albie Lewis (right), a FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer, talks with NC Governor Roy Cooper (left) aboard a Coast Guard C-130 aircraft after surveying the damage done by Hurricane Florence on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018.
Casey Toth / The News & Observer, Pool

Updated at 5:29 p.m.

Governor Roy Cooper toured storm damaged areas around the state Sunday and visited a shelter in Chapel Hill housing evacuees from Hurricane Florence.

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The North Carolina National Guard was deployed to help in the fight against Florence.
NC National Guard

On The Ground In Wilmington After Florence

North Carolina is still reeling from Hurricane Florence. The death toll from the storm rose to at least 37 people in three different states Tuesday, with 27 fatalities in North Carolina. There are roughly 10,000 people still in shelters. Governor Roy Cooper urged those who evacuated to stay put.

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The Cost of Summer

Summer camps cost too much for many working families, and that can impact their kids' learning. This Raleigh family found creative ways to fill the summer break.

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14 NC Community Colleges Remain Closed After Florence

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Aerial view of Wayne Community College campus
North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees

Fourteen campuses in the North Carolina Community College system remain closed in Eastern North Carolina as officials assess storm damage in the wake of Hurricane Florence.

Scotland High School in Laurinburg, North Carolina flooded as rivers rose from Hurricane Florence's massive rainfall. A tributary to the Leith Creek runs across the school's property.
Courtesy of Scotland County Schools

Schools across the southeastern part of the state remained closed this week as administrators begin to assess the damage from Hurricane Florence.

The University of North Carolina At Chapel Hill

American universities are designed to educate students while also responding to a public need. The research and innovation that stems from those schools is meant to lift up communities and the nation as a whole.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

Updated 2:46 p.m. | Sept. 12, 2018

Durham and Wake County school officials have announced they will close schools Thursday instead of dismissing students early, as had previously been announced. The decision follows parental concerns that an early dismissal would mean students are departing school just as hurricane-related weather is forecast to hit the Triangle.

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