Keri Brown

Keri Brown is a reporter and host at WFDD.  She comes to the Triad from West Virginia Public Broadcasting, where she served as the Chief Bureau Reporter for the Northern Panhandle. Prior to her time at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Keri was the head assignment editor at WTRF-TV in Wheeling and a field producer and assignment manager at WPGH Fox 53 in Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of Ohio University.

Keri has also served as an adjunct professor at Wheeling Jesuit University and Bethany College in West Virginia. She enjoys covering business and education stories. Keri has worked with the Center for Educational Technologies in Wheeling, W. Va. and other NASA centers across the country to develop several stories about the use of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) concepts in the classroom. 

Keri won a 2011 PRNDI award for her spot news coverage during the funeral for five Guilford County children who died in a murder-suicide shooting rampage.

The West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association awarded first place in the Feature category for her 2010 story about steel communities suffering from layoffs. Keri also received an Associated Press Award for Best Enterprise Reporting in 2005 for her story about drug trafficking in Wheeling.

A school classroom with desks that are socially distanced.
Keri Brown/WFDD

As schools decide whether or not to hold class in person or online, one big question is at the root of it all — how much is it going to cost? The funding debate has been front and center, from the federal level down to the state and local districts, each playing its own part in planning for the next school year. There are many challenges ahead to keep students learning and everyone safe and all of it comes with a price tag.

Keri Brown / WFDD

Karleigh King stands on her front porch, warming up her voice while her kids are down for naptime. This is her new normal, singing hymns at home, not with her congregation at Grace Bible Church in Winston-Salem. The building reopened earlier this month, but it looks a little different. Space is limited to 50 people, so there’s an online signup sheet. Every other church pew is blocked off for personal distancing. Only about a quarter of the congregation is attending indoor services right now.

Meat processing plants across the country are struggling with outbreaks of the coronavirus. That includes the Tyson Foods chicken processing facility in Wilkes County, N.C.

More than 2,200 workers were tested at the Wilkesboro plant, and 570 were positive for the coronavirus. Tyson said a majority of the workers who had the virus didn't show any symptoms.