Katy Barron

Producer, "The State of Things"

Ways to Connect

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)

When former schoolteacher Jane Whaley and her husband, Sam, founded Word of Faith Fellowship in Spindale, NC in 1979, no one could have imagined all that the institution would become: a religious movement with global impact; a community that provides housing and job opportunities to its congregation; and a cult dogged with allegations of physical, psychological and spiritual abuse

Amanda Magnus / WUNC

Compared to many other cultures around the world, Americans place a high value on cleanliness. But with the coronavirus now declared a global pandemic, we’ve all become hygiene-obsessed.

Courtesy of NCCU Football

Students and faculty at North Carolina Central University are still processing shock and grief following the tragic killing of Trevor VanDyke, a freshman defensive back for the Eagles football team who was fatally shot Monday night.

Our Three Winners

What is the definition of a hate crime? The new documentary “Anatomy of Hate,” explores that question through the events of the horrific triple murder in Chapel Hill on Feb. 10, 2015.

Vaping products
Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Duke University will become a smoke-free campus beginning in July 2020. The new policy has been in the works for several years, but the addition of electronic cigarettes and vaping products is relatively new.

UNC Press

Adults have long ignored, dismissed or misinterpreted youth activists. President Trump’s tweets blasting teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg for her “anger management problem” is one very public example.

A poster board covered in magazine cut-outs and photos related to health and wellness.
Courtesy of Bahby Banks

When the movie "Outbreak" came out in 1995, Bahby Banks was in high school, good at math and ready to join the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an epidemiologist tracking disease. But the more she learned about the broader contextual issues of public health, the more she wondered about what happens after the numbers are collected.

Courtesy of Jessica Ingram

While visiting Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama, photographer Jessica Ingram was struck by how familiar media images from the civil rights era, such as attack dogs and high-pressure water hoses turned on protestors, were memorialized in sculpture. She wondered what was left out of the dominant narrative of this time.

Flock Safety

Camera systems sold by the Atlanta-based company Flock Safety promise homeowners greater security. Flock cameras capture license plate numbers as vehicles come in and out of neighborhoods.

Courtesy of Alexis Pauline Gumbs

A multi-year, daily writing practice taught Alexis Pauline Gumbs a lot about what it means to listen. Deeply influenced by the black feminist author and scholar Sylvia Wynter, Gumbs’ daily exercise changed the way she thinks about the stories that define humanity and how she percieves her own ancestry.

Courtesy of Mary Haskett

Homelessness on campus does not always look the same as homelessness on the streets. It often means students without a place to stay end up couch surfing until they find a more permanent solution.

Courtesy of Virtual MLK

In this current climate of persistent heated discourse, it can be easy to forget that there was a time when one well-delivered speech could change hearts and minds. Such a speech was delivered inside the sanctuary of Durham’s White Rock Baptist church in 1960.

Sign that reads: Water Filtration Facility, 7441 Poplar Springs Church Road Sanford, NC 27330
Greg Barnes

Research on chemical pollutants in North Carolina’s rivers and streams is stacking up, and the results are unnerving.

Courtesy of The Daily Reflector

Infighting among the East Carolina University Board of Trustees has spilled out into the public realm once again. In the latest scandal, two trustees, Robert Moore and Phil Lewis, are accused of trying to convince a student to run for ECU student body president so they could ensure a voting majority on their board. 

Headshot of Canales.
Courtesy of Carla Canales

American classical music is overwhelmingly male and white, so if you’re trying to encourage diversity and equity in youth orchestras, the repertoire choices are not great. A new partnership between Durham-based El Sistema USA and The Canales Project is trying to mix it up.

Fruit of Labor logo
Courtesy of Angaza Laughinghouse

Members of The Fruit of Labor Singing Ensemble perform five-part harmonies and play instruments. But do not make the mistake of calling them a band. Their mission is much broader than playing gigs and producing albums.

North Carolina Climate Office

Many people could have worn flip-flops in the last days of 2019. The week before New Year’s Eve featured 70 degree days — but it was not a fluke. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information, 2019 was the warmest year on record in North Carolina so far. 

Scott Sharpe / News & Observer

In an ambitious new project, visual journalists from The Charlotte Observer, The News and Observer and the McClatchy Company spread out across the state of North Carolina to record the concerns of regular people.

Freelon sits on a tractor wheel with one of her tissue-paper pieces draped on the tractor.
Chris Charles for Garden & Gun

Durham artist Maya Freelon’s large tissue paper installations have hung in the halls of the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building and the North Carolina Museum of Art. She has received commissions from Google and Cadillac and was recently named one of five young artists to watch during Miami Art Week 2019. Her techniques transform tissue paper from schoolhouse craft to fine art and create community in collaborative quilt-making workshops.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers met for a one-day session this week, but in the end, not much has changed. There is still no budget for the current fiscal year as lawmakers enter their longest break in four years.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

From sappy to silly to downright vile, Hollywood has tried for generations to capture the many facets of the American family. Just in time for Thanksgiving, and for this month’s Movies on the Radio program, we asked our listeners for their favorite movies about families. In their choices, listeners often saw a version of their own family struggles splashed across the silver screen.

The Honor Was Mine: A Look Inside the Struggles of Military Veterans
Grand Harbor Press

 Note: this segment is a rebroadcast from September 7, 2016.

Simon & Schuster

Each new year brings with it resolutions and to-do lists. They are easy enough to make, but how do we stay motivated to actually do them? It is a topic behavioral economist Dan Ariely tackles in his new book, "Payoff: The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations" (Ted Books/2016). Ariely is the author of bestselling books about behavioral economics, a Duke professor, and the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Hindsight in Durham. 

Producer Laura Pellicer shares her favorite stories of 2016.
Charlie Shelton-Ormond / WUNC

For the final episode of our annual "Producer Picks" series,  veteran producer Katy Barron, and a rookie, The State of Things' newest producer, Laura Pellicer reflect on the stand-out stories from 2016. Barron and Pellicer are the behind the scenes actors that find fresh voices, make editorial decisions, and get the show to air every weekday. For this segment they step in front of the microphone to share their favorite segments they had a hand in producing. 

Nathania Johnson

We asked our listeners to make their selections for favorite topic or most engaging conversation on The State of Things in 2016. 

Meet Nancy Petty

Dec 19, 2016
Pullen Baptist Church

As an activist pastor at Raleigh’s progressive Pullen Baptist Church, Nancy Petty is often making news. She is openly gay and has championed marriage equality and LGBT rights. She has led Moral Monday protests and chairs the Reverend William Barber’s Repairers of the Breach board. Most recently her work has focused on facilitating interfaith dialogue with Raleigh’s Muslim community and fighting Islamaphobia and racism.  Her transformative journey from her small town upbringing in Shelby, North Carolina, paralleled major social shifts happening in the churches she has served.

Kat Miller

Guilford College professor Diya Abdo launched “Every Campus A Refuge” in response to the European refugee crisis that began in the summer of 2015. As a result of her effort, Guilford College partnered with a local resettlement agency and has since hosted three refugee clients on campus. Abdo has also scaled the model for other colleges and created an experiential minor on resettlement at Guilford. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Abdo about next steps and lessons learned from “Every Campus A Refuge.”

JC Raulston Arboretum Digital Archive

Horticulturist J.C. Raulston died in 1996, but his legacy lives on at the North Carolina State University arboretum that bears his name, the nine plants named in his honor, and all over the backyards and nurseries of North Carolina. 

stu_wp FLICKR Creative Commons

It’s our year end wrap up for Movies on the Radio and we want to know, what was your favorite movie of 2016?  Amid all the summer blockbusters and family films, did anything stand out? We've already got a submission for "The Witch," what's your favorite? Send an email to sot@wunc.org or tweet #sotmovie. Hurry! The holidays have shortened the deadline on this one. We need your submissions by December 15th.

 

Roy Cooper at a podium with his wife, addresses his supporters in Raleigh. North Carolina gubernatorial candidates Cooper and incumbent Pat McCrory are locked in a tie with their race likely heading to a recount.
Brian Batista / WUNC

Last night, North Carolinians watched as successful candidates for President, U.S. Senate, and State Supreme Court took to the podium to thank crowds of exuberant supporters in their acceptance speeches. But one race is still undecided: the race for North Carolina's governor. Only a few thousand votes separated Republican incumbent Pat McCrory from his Democratic challenger Roy Cooper. 

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