Silent Sam

File photo of Maya Little, a UNC graduate student arrested at a Silent Sam rally earlier this year.
Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

Activists and students who support the toppling of the Confederate Silent Sam statue at UNC Chapel Hill say they have been abused and assaulted by police. Pepper spray was used at one of the last demonstrations to disperse a crowd.

New Confederate States of America members pray at the fallen Silent Sam statue as protesters continue to chant against them on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018.
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Updated 9:30 p.m. | Sept. 8, 2018

A protest of the Confederate-era monument known as Silent Sam on the University of North Carolina's Chapel Hill campus led to injuries and the arrest of some protesters Saturday afternoon.

The pedestal of the Silent Sam statue without the Confederate monument on Tuesday, August 21, 2018.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

The protesters who brought down a Confederate statue at North Carolina's flagship university acted with "a righteous show of people power" after university leaders refused to remove it, one of those accused in the demonstration said Thursday.

A few dozen neo-Confederate protesters faced off with a few hundred dancing demonstrators at the site of the toppled Silent Sam statue at UNC- Chapel Hill on Aug. 30, 2018.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Updated 8:30 a.m. | August 31, 2018

The torn-down Silent Sam monument was the site of dueling protests Thursday night. About 50 members of a neo-Confederate group were greeted by several hundred counterprotesters on the campus of UNC Chapel Hill. 

Deciding Not To Decide On Silent Sam

Aug 29, 2018
Elizabeth Baier/WUNC

The Confederate statue Silent Sam, which stood on University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s campus since 1913, was toppled last week. On Tuesday the UNC Board of Governors held a nearly five-hour meeting, conducted almost exclusively behind closed doors, to decide what to do with the controversial statue.

The pedestal of the Silent Sam statue without the Confederate monument on Tuesday, August 21, 2018.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Updated 2:55 p.m. | Aug. 28, 2018

The Board of Trustees at UNC- Chapel Hill has until November 15 to decide the fate of Silent Sam, a Confederate monument that was recently toppled by protesters.

Silent Sam
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Police arrested seven people on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill Saturday, as counter-protestors clashed with men carrying Confederate battle flags and other signs. This came five days after the Silent Sam statue was brought down on campus.

Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

Silent Sam may no longer be standing on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus, but activist Maya Little says the fight is far from over. 

Silent Sam, UNC, Duke Chapel, Confederate Monuments
Leoneda Inge

Two prominent universities have removed Confederate statues on their campuses – but in very different ways – as campuses grapple with race and relics of the past.

Gerry Broome / AP Photo

Silent Sam fell to the ground Monday night, breaking through the dirt around its pedestal. Protesters cheered, and police, for the most part, looked on as protesters kicked the statue and captured photos of the controversial Confederate symbol. 

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Updated 12:05 p.m. | August 22, 2018

The North Carolina historical commission has agreed to keep three Confederate monuments on Capitol grounds.

Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

Silent Sam, the controversial confederate monument that stood on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s campus is gone.

Police stand guard after the confederate statue known as Silent Sam was toppled by protesters on campus at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., Monday, Aug. 20, 2018.
Gerry Broome / AP

Updated 1:50 p.m. | Aug. 21, 2018

Leaders of North Carolina's university system spoke out Tuesday to condemn the toppling of a century-old Confederate memorial on the state's flagship campus by protesters who decried racist motives for its placement on campus dating to a dedication speech praising violence against former slaves.

University police stand watch inside a barricade around the Silent Sam Statue at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the statue on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

The University of North Carolina Board of Governors will do nothing, for now, about an embattled Confederate monument on the public university system's flagship campus.

University police stand watch inside a barricade around the Silent Sam Statue at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the statue on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

The University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in the past year to provide security around its contentious Confederate monument. UNC police estimate that between July 2017 and July 2018, the campus has spent $393,000 dollars on security around Silent Sam.

Courtesy of the Independent Media Institute.

A national group has erected two billboards in Raleigh seeking the removal of a Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

The base of the Confederate monument at UNC-Chapel Hill known as Silent Sam was doused in red Monday, April 30, 2018
Courtesy of Will Partin

A Confederate monument nicknamed Silent Sam has been standing on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill since 1913.

The base of the Confederate monument at UNC-Chapel Hill known as Silent Sam was doused in red Monday, April 30, 2018
Courtesy of Will Partin

A UNC-Chapel Hill graduate student has made her first court appearance after dumping red paint and some of her blood onto a Confederate statue on campus.

The base of the Confederate monument at UNC-Chapel Hill known as Silent Sam was doused in red Monday, April 30, 2018
Courtesy of Will Partin

A University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill graduate student says she used her own blood and jugs of ink to paint a Confederate monument on campus red.

University police stand watch inside a barricade around the Silent Sam Statue at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the statue on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

Fearing violence or vandalism at a campus rally against a Confederate statue, two top University of North Carolina leaders privately lamented their dilemma and appeared envious of another university that abruptly took down similar monuments, newly released emails show.

Lisa Philip / WUNC

The University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Board of Trustees held a public hearing Wednesday to gather opinions on Silent Sam. That’s the Confederate monument sitting near the entrance to the UNC campus that has become the focal point of protests and denouncements by students, faculty, and even entire university departments.

The Silent Sam monument stands prominently on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s campus. Protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the monument on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

Thirty-four faculty members of the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill School of Law have sent a letter to Chancellor Carol Folt urging the immediate removal of the Silent Sam Confederate monument.

University police stand watch inside a barricade around the Silent Sam Statue at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill protestors for and against the statue’s removal attended rallies near the statue on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Matt Couch / WUNC

A New York-based law firm representing 12 students and a professor at North Carolina's flagship public university is pressing the school to remove a Confederate soldier statue.

Police surround a Confederate monument during a protest to remove the statue at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017.
Gerry Broome / AP

Hundreds of people rallied Tuesday night at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill campus in opposition of a Confederate statue known as Silent Sam.

A crowd gathered at the 'Silent Sam' statue at UNC - Chapel Hill on Tuesday, August 22, 2017.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Updated 11:45 a.m., August 23, 2017

Three people are facing charges related to a demonstration against a Confederate statue at the University of North Carolina.

The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee was removed from  the Duke University Chapel days after it was vandalized.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Editor's Note: In December, Duke University announced it will leave an empty space where it removed a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. That's so it can spend another year studying a proper replacement. President Vincent Price approved the yearlong study period recommended by a campus historical commission. The commission was convened in September after the statue's removal. Lee was among 10 figures depicted at Duke Chapel in or near its entryway.

Duke University quickly and quietly removed a controversial statue from its most iconic building over the weekend.

Elena Ceberio

Hundreds have gathered across the Triangle in candlelight vigils for victims of the deadly attack in Charlottesville, Virginia. One day after a car plowed into a crowd of people counter-protesting a white supremacist rally, North Carolinians gathered at various sites to remember the slain 32 year-old Heather Heyer and 19 others who were injured.

Thomas Brown studies landmarks of Confederate memory such as the flag, shown here flying at the South Carolina capitol before it was taken down this summer.
eyeliam / Flickr Creative Commons

The Confederate flag has been around for more than a century, yet the controversial symbol has been in the headlines almost every week this year. South Carolina removed the flag from their state grounds this summer after the shooting of churchgoers in Charleston, but the debate over Confederate symbols has continued across the nation.

Historian Thomas Brown has studied landmarks of Confederate memory around the country and examines what they can teach us about Americans’ changing political, social, and economic positions.

The pick-up trucks and cars adorned with Confederate and American flags flapping in the air were hard to miss as they rolled down Franklin Street.

As the caravan came to a stop, one woman got out of her truck with a flag wrapped around her waist. Others sported rebel caps and Confederate t-shirts.

A Confederate monument
Daderot / Wikimedia Commons

The shooting of nine African-Americans earlier this month has prompted national debate over whether the Confederate battle flag should continue to fly at the South Carolina Capitol.

Gov. Nikki Haley called for the flag to be taken down while President Obama said it "represented more than just ancestral pride" during the eulogy of Rev. Clementa Pinckney Friday.

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