Charlotte

A group called "Retire the Red Raider" is lobbying the Gaston County school board to change the mascot for Belmont's South Point High School.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

President Donald Trump's plans for a grand convention keep shrinking.

This is no ordinary year.

A pandemic is sweeping across the world as cries for changes to address systemic racism fill the streets of American cities. The economy is reeling, and a presidential election is looming. But sometimes self-expression thrives amid turmoil.

Superintendent Earnest Winston said Tuesday that Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools will get rid of all school names "that many in our community say glorify a racist, hateful and painful past."

Updated 4:15 p.m.

Police say three people were killed and 11 others injured after a shooting at a block party in northwest Charlotte early Monday. Five of the people injured were hit by cars. 

Demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality are now in their third week in Charlotte. On Monday evening, about 75 protesters gathered at uptown's First Ward Park just before a light rain began to fall.

Throughout American history, faith-based communities and leaders have been at the forefront of many civil and political movements. This is especially true for the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, which had religious leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King and Malcolm X being driving forces in history. 

The Republican National Committee has tentatively decided to move much of its political convention to Jacksonville, Florida, while leaving some of the business aspects of the convention in Charlotte, according to a story in the Washington Post.

Police disperse tear gas in downtown Raleigh during a protest on May 30, 2020 to call for justice in the death of George Floyd, a black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis earlier in the week.
Peyton Sickles / For WUNC

The Charlotte City Council has voted to stop funding chemical agents for police use after the city’s police boxed in and gassed demonstrators protesting the death of George Floyd.

People gathered outside CMPD headquarters in uptown Charlotte on May 30 to protest. (WFAE)
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The police department in North Carolina's largest city is coming under criticism after a video posted to social media appeared to show officers using chemical agents on demonstrators who were boxed in while protesting the death of George Floyd.

Dina Deykun

Music offered Arsena Schroeder a way out from the lucrative path set before her. In college, she interned with financial firms and spent a summer on Capitol Hill, but she began to realize that  the high-powered executive lifestyle was not her calling. She was the first in her family to finish an undergraduate degree, but after that point she abandoned the path everyone expected her to follow. 

Updated at 7:47 p.m.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police say they have secured the scene of a shooting at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

Courtesy of Sarah Delia / WFAE

During the summer of 2015, a Charlotte woman was sexually assaulted by a stranger. She believes she knows who her attacker is, but for the past three years she has struggled to find justice. A year ago, she took her story to WFAE, the NPR affiliate in Charlotte, and they decided to turn her journey into a podcast.

Several hands of different colors raised.
John LeMasney / Creative commons

A controversial charter school bill passed in the General Assembly on Wednesday. The bill would allow four municipalities outside Charlotte to run their own charter schools.

Charlotte, N.C., the state's largest city
James Willamor / Flickr Creative Commons

North Carolina's largest city has submitted its bid to host the 2020 Republican National Convention.

CMPD has released five body camera videos related to the Sept. 6 shooting of Rueben Galindo. The footage shows he had his arms raised when officer shot him.

Robert Scoble / Flickr - Creative Commons

Amazon’s recent announcement to establish a new headquarters in North America has ignited a frenzy of proposals from various cities. 

Reporters Alex Olgin and Tom Bullock discuss the mayoral election results with WFAE's Mark Rumsey.

Updated 10:36 p.m.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts conceded victory to Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles Tuesday in Charlotte's Democratic mayoral primary. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Lyles had about 46.2 percent to Roberts's 36.2 percent. Joel Ford was a distant third with about 15.9 percent.

Once the results are certified, Lyles will face Republican Kenny Smith in the general election on Nov. 7. 

The final debate before any election is always the most contentious, the most pointed, some would say the most fun.

Wednesday night's Charlotte mayoral debate was no exception. It was televised in prime time and featured just the top tier candidates running for mayor. And it came just days before the all- important September 12 primary.

Jay Price/WUNC

Yesterday Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts lifted the midnight curfew that had been in place since Thursday evening. Demonstrations in Charlotte have been largely peaceful over the weekend even after family members and law enforcement released video footage of the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Adam Rhew, associate editor at Charlotte Magazine and a freelance journalist, about the video footage, the mood in Charlotte and next steps for both the investigation and the demonstrators.

Governor Pat McCrory
Hal Goodtree / Flickr Creative Commons

The NBA announced that the 2017 All-Star Game will not be held in Charlotte as planned.

The decision comes after state lawmakers did not make enough changes to the law known as House Bill 2 to satisfy the league. It could cost the state more than $100 million in economic impact and the decision will be a factor in the gubernatorial race between incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper.

photo of Greg Humphreys Electric Trio
Mike Benson

After more than 15 years touring as a musician, Greg Humphreys decided it was time to slow things down. He took a break from his career as a solo artist to focus on other things he'd put on the sidelines. He eventually moved to New York City, got married and had a kid.

Cities, counties and states across America are contemplating non-discrimination protections for transgender people. It would allow them to use the bathroom of their choice, but that has caused controversy.
Rusty Clark / Flickr Creative Commons

The transgender community has received greater visibility in pop culture with the stories of Laverne Cox and Caitlyn Jenner in recent years. And in North Carolina, the Charlotte City Council recently passed an ordinance to include non-discrimination protections for LGBT individuals.

But despite the progress, 2015 also saw a record number of murders of transgender people, specifically women of color.

Image of bathroom sign
The LEAF Project / Flickr Creative Commons

The Charlotte City Council passed an ordinance to include non-discrimination protections for the LGBT community.

Although the expanded protection includes a variety of changes, the most controversial measure allows transgender people to use the bathroom of their choice.

The city council voted 7-4 in favor of the ordinance expansion, but Governor Pat McCrory and other Republican legislators have indicated the state may intervene.

Mary Kratt in rhododendron at age 6
Mary Kratt

Historian and author Mary Kratt grew up in the countryside surrounded by trees, the occasional quail hunter and not much else. As a little girl she spent a lot of time on her own and became a keen observer of her surroundings and other people, and she says that’s exactly why she is a successful poet today. 

Kratt has authored six poetry books and a number of books and essays on Charlotte history.

Image of Golden on the campaign trail for Robert F. Kennedy's successful run for US Senate. The inscription reads: "To Harry...and afterwards I put on my coat, did what you told me, and won the election. My thanks, Bob Kennedy"
Harry Golden Papers, J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Harry Golden is no longer a household name in North Carolina, but at one point he was likely the most famous North Carolinian in the country. Golden was a Jewish-American writer who grew up in New York City’s Lower East Side in the early 1900s.

The North Carolina School for Science and Math was a finalist for Spaces for Innovation Challenge at the Emerging Issues Forum.
Ildar Sagdejev

Innovation is thriving across the state of North Carolina and communities are becoming more intentional about providing spaces that nurture creative thinking.

He started out in golf as a caddy, earning handfuls of change as a boy. Decades later, Charlie Sifford was named to the World Golf Hall of Fame, after a career marked by talent, character and the drive to change his sport. Sifford, the first black golfer to hold a PGA Tour card, has died at age 92.

View from the hilltop at Carver Pond Apartments on Meriwether Drive in Durham, North Carolina
Ildar Sagdejev

  In North Carolina, two million families live without adequate housing. 

Tommy Rieman in his office at Charlotte Bridge Home, with the action figure that bears his likeness.
Carol Jackson

Under different circumstances, Tommy Rieman could have been charged with a DUI when he got drunk and drove into a tree. But because he's a veteran he was enrolled in the state's first Veterans Treatment Court, a program designed to give support rather than punishment.

This chapter of Rieman's story starts in Iraq, 2003.

"Before the war started we were in Iraq, calling in air strikes you know?" he remembers. "I was 21, 22 years old. You're on top of the world."

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