Gov. Roy Cooper Calls For Trump To Step Down, Joins Chorus Of NC Congressional Delegates

Jan 7, 2021

Credit File Photo, Courtesy Governor Roy Cooper Twitter

Updated at 8:15 p.m.

In a Tweet issued Wednesday afternoon, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper called for President Donald Trump to either step down or be removed from office. The Tweet was personally signed, indicating that it came directly from Cooper and not a member of his staff. 

The call comes after unprecedented events at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. After Trump incited violence at his "Stop The Steal" rally, pro-Trump extremists stormed the Capitol building. Four individuals died in the fray, including one woman who was shot to death by Capitol police.

In calling for Trump's removal, Cooper joins a cry from other North Carolina Democrats. At least four of the five Democratic members of North Carolina's congressional delegation issued similar statements today.

Democratic Rep. David Price of Chapel Hill said in a statement that he was calling on Vice President Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment and that he is "cosponsoring Articles of Impeachment."


The 25th Amendment allows for the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet to declare the president unfit for office. The vice president then becomes acting president.

Rep. Alma Adams of Charlotte similarly issued a statement on Thursday saying "Donald Trump cannot remain in office another day" and to "remove this cancer from the White House immediately.”

Rep. Kathy Manning of Greensboro called for the president to be "removed from office immediately" either through the "25th Amendment or impeachment."

Democratic Rep. G.K. Butterfield of Wilson wants Vice President Mike Pence to “discuss” invoking the 25th Amendment. He also said he fears Congress lacks “sufficient time to engage in an impeachment proceeding.”

The calls from members of the North Carolina congressional delegation echo Speaker Nancy Pelosi who is urging the vice president to also invoke the 25th Amendment to force Trump out.

Of the eight Republican members of North Carolina's House delegation, only one - Rep. Patrick McHenry - voted to certify the Electoral College vote. All five Democrats in the House delegation and Republican U.S. Sens. Richard Burr and Thom Tillis also voted for certification. The seven Republican members of Congress who objected to the Electoral College count were: Dan Bishop, Ted Budd, Madison Cawthorn, Richard Hudson, David Rouzer, Virginia Foxx and Greg Murphy.