Hurricane Florence

Credit: NASA

Asheville may be tucked away in the mountains, but it is quickly building a reputation as “climate city,” a home for researchers, scientific entrepreneurs and nonprofit and governmental organizations working to address climate change.

Islands Fresh Mex Grill in Wilmington hosted a fundraiser for Trask Middle School's PTA, which has been giving aid to families and teachers affected by Hurricane Florence. Staff and families at the event, just a week into school, already had the threat of
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

New Hanover County Schools are just getting back to class, meanwhile the threat of Hurricane Michael has many feeling nervous.

Trask Middle School staff and their families gathered at Islands Fresh Mex Grill in Wilmington for an evening fundraiser this week. Proceeds from the burritos and taco salads sold will go to the school's Parent/Teachers’ Association.

Residents of an apartment complex in Fayetteville, look at a flooded car in a parking lot on Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

In the storm-weary Carolinas, Hurricane Michael's approach is stoking fresh fears among homeowners who still have tarps on their roofs or industrial dehumidifiers drying their floors from destruction left by Hurricane Florence.

'Hope to Hopeless': Will Governments Step Up After Second Storm?

Oct 10, 2018
A house is surrounded by floodwaters from Hurricane Florence in Lumberton, N.C., Monday, Sept. 17, 2018.
Gerald Herbert / AP

The Center for Public Integrity is a nonprofit investigative news organization based in Washington, DC. This story is part of the Center for Public Integrity’s “Abandoned in America” series, profiling communities connected by their profound needs and sense of political abandonment at a time when President Donald Trump’s administration has declared the nation’s war on poverty “largely over and a success.”

Edwin A. Anderson Elementary School 2nd grade teacher Jenna Parker talks with students on Oct. 4, 2018 as they reflect on their experiences Hurricane Florence made landfall in Wilmington.
Michael Cline Spencer / For WUNC

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

A North Carolina State University researcher is using underwater microphones to help better understand the extensive array of animals living in the state’s oyster reefs.
James Morrison / WUNC

While cleanup crews are getting a good idea of how much the damage Hurricane Florence will cost, it's not yet clear what the storm might have done to North Carolina's fishing industry. 

File photo of rising flood waters brought on by Hurricane Florence that threatened a building off highway 70 in Goldsboro, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Inside FEMA's statewide headquarters, workers in khakis, collared shirts and ID badges type away at computers, and work phones.

New Hanover County teacher Jenna Parker looks through her planner at her desk in her second grade classroom at Anderson Elementary School in Wilmington.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools, as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers were in and out this week, addressing Florence relief while avoiding the usual partisan bickering or the occasional surprise. Becki Gray and Rob Schofield discuss this week's one-day special session, as well as a federal investigation into North Carolina's largest political donor, and a legislative committee taking aim at the treatment of college athletes.

Jose Perez-Santiago, right, holds his daughter Jordalis, 2, as they return to their home for the first time since it was flooded in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Spring Lake, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. "I didn't realize we would lose everyt
David Goldman / AP

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools, as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

State education leaders are calling for donations to assist students and educators who lost belongings and school supplies during Hurricane Florence.

Principal Maggie Rollison of Trask Middle School in Wilmington, N.C. fights back tears while recalling her experience as a "shelter principal" during Hurricane Florence
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Since the day Hurricane Florence began battering the North Carolina coast, WUNC’s education reporters have been following staff and families in New Hanover County Schools, as they first weathered the storm, and now work to put their classrooms and schools back together.

When storms roll into Wilmington, Trask Middle School usually serves as an emergency shelter. But the school’s principal Maggie Rollison knew Florence was different when shelter guests started arriving 10 hours before the shelter opened.

Rising water following Hurricane Florence is leading to road closures like this on on Arrington Bridge Road in Goldsboro, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Highway officials outlined their Hurricane Florence response and recovery efforts for a house committee in Raleigh this week.

State Department of Transportation Secretary James Trogdon told lawmakers the catastrophic storm dumped an estimated 8 trillion gallons of rain on the state, equivalent to more than 1 trillion cubic feet of water.

"So Florence would have filled Jordan Lake 536 times," Trogdon told committee members.

Many roads have re-opened but not all of them, said Trogdon.

It’s been almost three weeks since Hurricane Florence slammed into the Cape Fear region. And during these last few weeks, thousands of residents and small business owners have been trying to put their lives back together. They have had some help. Such as the Disaster Recovery Center at Independence Mall.

A child looks out a window at Knightdale High School, which has been converted into an evacuation shelter for people affected by Hurricane Florence in Kinghtdale, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

As Hurricane Florence flood waters continue to recede, thousands of students are still out of school in North Carolina. Estimates show this storm caused three times as much damage to the state’s schools as Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

State lawmakers have passed a bill to address all the days some schools have missed in the wake of Hurricane Florence.

Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence top a section of U.S. 421 near the Pender-New Hanover County line north of Wilmington.
NC Department of Transportation

Hurricane Florence lashed Wilmington with high winds when it made landfall more than two weeks ago, and then the trouble started. The storm inundated the coastal city with 30 to 40 inches of rain in three days.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers hold a special session Tuesday to discuss the response to Hurricane Florence. Legislators will decide how much money to appropriate for disaster relief while citizens and state agencies are still trying to tally up the damages.

Emergency workers inspect a power line that was damaged by a tree uprooted by Hurricane Florence in Mount Olive, N.C., Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Updated at 3:30 p.m.

North Carolina lawmakers have quickly approved their initial legislation designed to address the damage and logistics problems caused by Hurricane Florence.

A thin film of coal ash coats trees and vegetation in an inactive ash basin at the HF Lee plant. As expected, the area was flooded by Hurricane Florence.
c/o Duke Energy

Regulators with the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality say their tests on the Neuse River show no elevated levels of dangerous metals in the water.

The results came as a relief to Duke Energy, but were in direct conflict with tests taken by the Waterkeeper Alliance, an environmental advocacy group.

Coastal Counties Begin Clean Up After Hurricane Florence

Oct 1, 2018
Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence top a section of U.S. 421 near the Pender-New Hanover County line north of Wilmington.
NC Department of Transportation

Coastal towns and counties hit by Hurricane Florence are digging out from under tons of debris.

Pender County was one of the hardest hit areas.

“We think that Hurricane Florence is [Hurricane] Matthew and Floyd on steroids,” County spokeswoman Tammy Proctor said, assessing the flood levels and subesquent damage.

Chef Jose Andres feeds search and rescue teams in Columbus County, NC
World Central Kitchen

Chef Jose Andres started the World Central Kitchen to provide meals for those affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Eight years later, his organization teamed up with local chefs to cook meals for people displaced by Hurricane Florence.

NC 12 Reopens, Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry Resumes

Sep 28, 2018
Post-storm view of NC-12 on Ocracoke Island after Hurricane Florence
National Park Service

Traffic is flowing again all along the Outer Banks' NC 12 for the first time since Hurricane Florence hit.

Jason DeBruyn / WUNC

 The historic flooding from Florence has eased, but communities and environmentalists are just beginning to take stock of the damage it caused.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State legislators will return to Raleigh Tuesday to come up with more money for people and areas affected by Hurricane Florence.

Nurse Carpathia McRavin, left, draws blood from Bud Sadler, right, of Cedar Point, at a Veterans Affairs mobile health clinic in Havelock on Thursday, September 20, 2018 following Hurricane Florence.
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

The VA is trying to take care of hundreds of thousands of veterans in hurricane-damaged Eastern North Carolina. Some have medical problems that could be worsened by the storm; others have housing needs. 

The first thing that hit Ashley Simpson when she opened her car door was the smell: a rotten, stale, mold smell, leftover from the sewage-contaminated floodwaters that engulfed her silver 2010 Chevrolet HHR Cruiser during Hurricane Florence. The next thing to hit her were the gnats flying out that had been breeding amid the mold for nearly a week.

Britt Snuzz Uzzell
Gabby Bulgarelli for WUNC Music

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time around we're talking about the song "Fayetteville."  The city has had a rough week.  The Cape Fear River crested at near record levels, flooding streets and neighborhoods and forcing people out of their homes.

Many have left town for higher ground, but if they're anything like songwriter Britt Uzzell they'll be back.

Scotland High School in Laurinburg, North Carolina flooded as rivers rose from Hurricane Florence's massive rainfall. A tributary to the Leith Creek runs across the school's property.
Courtesy of Scotland County Schools

State lawmakers say they are drafting a bill to help schools deal with all the missed days they are having due to Hurricane Florence. Some schools in the southeast part of the state plan to miss two weeks or more as they clean and repair buildings and grounds damaged by the storm and flooding.

A view of the flooded downtown in Seven Springs, N.C., after Hurricane Florence.
Jay Price / WUNC

The town of Seven Springs is tiny, with a little more than a hundred people in the 2010 census. And it got tinier after Hurricane Matthew.

The banks of the Cape Fear River on Friday, Sept. 21, 2018.
Courtesy of Waterkeepers Alliance

There's ongoing disagreement about the levels of coal ash in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Environmental advocates say they have visibly seen ash, but Duke Energy says its water tests show otherwise.

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