Gerrymandering

Portrait of George Holding
Courtesy of George Holding

North Carolina's newly redrawn congressional map has convinced at least one Republican incumbent not to run for reelection next year. U.S. Rep. George Holding issued a statement today acknowledging that changes to the 2nd Congressional District factored into his decision not to seek another term in 2020.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Plans to overhaul North Carolina's Medicaid program are on an indefinite hold — another casualty of the budget impasse. 

A Republican-led investigation concluded Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper improperly handled negotiations over a mitigation fund related to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline project.

And, on the heels of legislative redistricting, a five-term state senator has announced his retirement. 

Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch and Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation give their takes — from the left and the right — on what's behind the week's political news. 


The final Congressional District map approved by the North Carolina General Assembly on Nov. 15, 2019.
N.C. General Assembly

Updated at 2:45 p.m.

North Carolina judges have officially delayed candidate filing for the state's congressional seats while they sort out whether replacement districts approved by Republicans who lost another political gerrymandering case should be used for next year's elections.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

North Carolina's General Assembly approved a replacement congressional map. 

Newly elected Republican Congressman Dan Bishop tweeted out the name of the person he believes is the whistleblower at the center of the ongoing impeachment inquiry. 

And state lawmakers adjourned an extra-long legislative session without resolving a budget impasse.  

Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch — on the left —and Mitch Kokai of the John Locke Foundation— on the right — weigh in on the week's political news. 


The final Congressional District map approved by the North Carolina General Assembly on Nov. 15.
N.C. General Assembly

A replacement map for North Carolina's congressional districts was finalized Friday, with its lines redrawn to address alleged extreme partisan bias and endangering reelection prospects for two Republicans next year.

The Supreme Court elections are coming and things are getting interesting (gavel on tabletop).
flickr.com/photos/leviphotos

North Carolina’s highest court won’t hasten an appeal by an advocacy group and state Democrats who say the Republican-controlled General Assembly didn’t do a good enough job redrawing legislative districts for the 2020 elections.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

The North Carolina Senate could vote Friday on newly redrawn congressional district lines to replace the current electoral map. A Republican majority pushed the map through the House on Thursday, hoping to avoid postponing North Carolina's Super Tuesday primaries in March.

United States Representatives George Holding, left, and Mark Walker could have their seats threatened based on proposed Congressional maps.
U.S. House

The political future of two GOP incumbents could be endangered as North Carolina Republican legislators advanced a new congressional district map Thursday in response to a partisan gerrymandering lawsuit.

A breakdown of North Carolina's Congressional delegation through the years
UNC Library / Jason deBruyn

A joint legislative committee finished up its work Wednesday on redrawing North Carolina's 13 congressional district boundaries, producing more than a dozen possible replacements. Now,the redistricting process must move through the house and senate with candidate filing for 2020 less than three weeks away.

Census 2020
Census Bureau

House Democrats investigating the origins of a proposed citizenship question for the 2020 Census said Tuesday they've found previously undisclosed communications between a Trump administration adviser and a redistricting guru who favored excluding noncitizens from population counts to help Republicans.

State lawmakers will be back in Raleigh Tuesday to continue work on redrawing North Carolina's 13 congressional district boundaries. A joint house-senate redistricting committee is acting on a state court's urging that lawmakers fix what the judges indicated was a map gerrymandered with excessive partisan bias.

NC legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Legislators met this week to tackle the task of redrawing congressional maps. The first meeting determined Republicans want to use the maps created for the advocacy group Common Cause North Carolina, while Democrats want to start from scratch. A three-judge panel ruled last week that the gerrymandered districts be redrawn in time for the 2020 election.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Lawmakers in the North Carolina General Assembly have begun redrawing congressional districts again. 

Republican U.S. Rep. Mark Walker is in his third term representing what is currently known as the 6th District. The boundaries have already shifted several times since he first took office. 

Walker talks about the frustrations of constant redistricting, why he joined a protest against the impeachment inquiry process, and why he's pushing to let college athletes get paid. 


CSPAN via AP, File

A North Carolina judge ruled on Monday that more than 100,000 computer documents generated by a recently deceased Republican redistricting guru that address political work in several states are no longer under the court's confidentiality order.

The House has voted to formalize an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. As expected, the vote was divided along party lines, with two Democrats voting against the inquiry.

2016 map
Credit North Carolina General Assembly

A three-judge panel has ordered North Carolina legislators to throw out the current Congressional maps.

A districts map is shown as a three-judge panel of the Wake County Superior Court presides over the trial of Common Cause, et al. v. Lewis, et al at the Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, July 15, 2019.
Gerry Broome / AP

North Carolina state judges who rejected state legislative district maps over what they called GOP bias upheld on Monday all the remapping that they ordered Republicans last month to perform.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

A Wake County Superior Court panel will decide whether to block the use of North Carolina's current congressional district maps in next year's elections, with candidate filing for the 2020 contests just around the corner.

gavel
wp paarz / Flickr - Creative Commons -https://flic.kr/p/GDRLvC

Updated at 4 p.m. | Oct. 24, 2019

Evidence is so strong that Republicans carved North Carolina's congressional districts for a specific — and illegal — partisan advantage that those lines must be barred now from use, a lawyer representing voters told judges on Thursday.

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Dave Crosby / flickr

State lawmakers will look at proposals for reforming the way political boundaries are drawn for North Carolina elections. Sponsors of three bills will address the House  Redistricting Committee Thursday just as a state court takes up a lawsuit challenging North Carolina's current congressional maps.

NC legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Former North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes will plead guilty to charges that he lied to FBI agents.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Democrats have filed another lawsuit challenging North Carolina's political boundaries, this time charging that the congressional map is too partisan. Could it make tensions between state Republicans and Democrats worse? This week the finger-pointing between lawmakers in the General Assembly included calls for lie detector tests.

Meanwhile, more resignations made us wonder who would want to be president of the UNC System. And video of a drunk driver raised questions about whether Blue Cross NC properly reported the arrest of its CEO. 

Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch synthesize the week's political news.

The gerrymandered North Carolina Congressional district map
North Carolina General Assembly

Buoyed by a favorable ruling this month involving legislative districts, North Carolina voters sued again on Friday to overturn the state's congressional map, alleging Republican state lawmakers manipulated lines to maximize GOP seats.

Photo of inside of NC Senate Chambers
Daderot / Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina will soon have new legislative maps. The previous maps were tossed out after a three-judge panel unanimously declared them unconstitutional partisan gerrymanders.

Andrew Yang at a speaking event in front of an American flag.
Gage Skidmore/ Creative Commons

Two long-awaited special elections in North Carolina are just days away. On Tuesday, Sept. 10 voters will cast ballots in the 3rd and 9th Congressional Districts.

Map outlining North Carolina's House districts.
Courtesy of the North Carolina State Board of Elections

On Tuesday, a three-judge panel in Raleigh ruled that North Carolina's legislative maps are unconstitutional partisan gerrymanders that favor Republicans. The court ordered state legislators to draw up new maps within two weeks, ahead of the primaries for the 2020 election. Republican Senate leader Phil Berger announced that he will not appeal the decision, despite many earlier pledges to do so from Republican lawmakers and staff.

Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

A North Carolina judicial panel on Tuesday rejected state legislative district maps, saying legislators took extreme advantage from drawing voting districts to help elect a maximum number of Republican lawmakers. The judges gave lawmakers two weeks to try again.

A three-judge panel of the Wake County Superior Court presides over the trial of Common Cause, et al v. Lewis, et al at the Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, July 15, 2019.
Gerry Broome / AP

Updated at 2:45 p.m. | July 26, 2019

A three-judge North Carolina panel was considering Friday whether politicians can be too extreme in drawing legislative voting districts to their advantage, a judgment the U.S. Supreme Court refused to make about congressional elections.

A districts map is shown as a three-judge panel of the Wake County Superior Court presides over the trial of Common Cause, et al. v. Lewis, et al at the Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, July 15, 2019.
Gerry Broome / AP

Election advocacy groups and Democrats are arguing in state court that North Carolina Republicans unlawfully discriminated against voters based on political leanings when they drew legislative maps to preserve GOP majorities.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Two major opinions were handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday.

One ruled that federal judges do not have the authority to end extreme partisan gerrymandering, while the other stopped - for now - a citizenship question for the 2020 Census.

Rob Schofield, of NC Policy Watch, and Beck Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, discuss the impact of those decisions, while also turning their attention toward the debate surrounding the state budget.

Pages