Corrections & Clarifications

WUNC aims to provide consistently high quality public service programming presented with integrity. Correcting our mistakes is an essential element of that integrity. WUNC editors will determine when a mistake needs to be corrected or a story needs to be clarified. Digital versions of the story will be corrected or clarified and a note of the correction placed at the bottom of the text. Those stories will also appear on this page. Broadcast corrections will occur as soon as possible and/or at a similar time of day as the original broadcast at the discretion of WUNC editors.

To request a correction, please email news@wunc.org or call 919-445-9150 or 800-962-9862.

Effective October 1, 2017

Ways to Connect

A picture of lights on a police car.
Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr Creative Commons

Five former detention officers and a nurse at a North Carolina jail have been charged with involuntary manslaughter after a man died last December, a district attorney said Wednesday.

The coronavirus pandemic appears to have helped spur an increase in gun sales. New preliminary research suggests those additional sales could be linked to higher rates of gun violence.

As Black, Latinx, and Indigenous populations continue to endure a disproportionate number of COVID-19-related deaths, state and local health departments are working to increase access to testing and other health care services for communities of color.

Host Leoneda Inge travels to a free testing site in a predominantly Black community in Tallahassee, FL, and talks with Dr. Cardra Burns, senior deputy director of the North Carolina Division of Public Health, about our state’s efforts to bolster testing and break down systemic barriers to health care.

In this Sunday, June 21 image, a message of 'DEFUND' points to the Durham Police Headquarters. The street art was painted as part of the Black Lives Matter protests in the city.
Chuck Liddy / For WUNC

In the month since George Floyd’s killing sparked protests nationwide, some demonstrators in Durham have literally taken their message to the police.

Clifford Shuping feeds his goats outside his home in Rockwell, N.C. A Korean War era veteran, Shuping died of COVID-19 at the N.C. State Veterans Home in Salisbury last month.
Courtesy of Carrie McKinney

Clifford Paul Shuping, who served in the Army during the Korean conflict, passed away from COVID-19 at the State Veterans Home in Salisbury. As part of an effort to honor North Carolina veterans who have died during the pandemic, WUNC spoke with Shuping's family about his life and legacy.

How Do Police Use Force In NC? Most Agencies Won't Say

Jun 16, 2020
Police disperse tear gas in downtown Raleigh during a protest on May 30, 2020 to call for justice in the death of George Floyd, a black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis earlier in the week.
Peyton Sickles / For WUNC

Law enforcement agencies across the state refuse to tell the public how they use force when policing their communities, citing provisions in state law they say shield such records from public view.

That's according to a survey of more than a dozen state and local police departments and sheriff's offices in North Carolina conducted over the past two weeks by a network of journalists from across the state.

Creative Commons / https://bit.ly/2XGdqGz

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates. For a recap of last week's news, check out Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of June 1.

6:30 p.m. - Opponents of the Governor's order banning mass gatherings plan to rally in Alamance County tomorrow. An announcement from ReOpen NC says it is sponsoring a fundraiser for Ace Speedway's legal defense. A judge issued a temporary restraining order against the racetrack, which had been hosting crowded stock car racing events the past three weekends. Since April, ReOpen NC has held repeated rallies in the state capitol to protest restrictions on business and activity meant to stem the spread of the coronavirus. - Rebecca Martinez, WUNC

Tyson Farms meat processing plant in Wilkesboro was temporarily closed for cleaning after workers tested positive for COVID-19
Jacob Biba / Carolina Public Press

Meatpacking plants are breeding grounds for COVID-19 among workers.

Plant employees typically stand shoulder-to-shoulder on their feet for hours at a time, shoving and cutting carcasses. The work causes them to breathe heavily, and if they have COVID-19, they are spreading virus into the air, said Dr. Lisa Gralinski, an assistant professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

photo of drive-thru coronavirus testing in Chatham County
Staff Sgt. Mary Junell / U.S. Army Photo


  Gregoria Riva’s two year-old son jumps up and down, the TV playing in the background. He is bored, she says, but she can’t risk letting him play outside with other kids. Riva is the sole caretaker of young Santiago. And until recently, she was employed at a meat processing plant, one of the workplaces with increased risk for COVID-19.

Student practices wheel throwing in an East Carolina University ceramics class.
Courtesy of East Carolina University

Teachers and college professors have been given a huge challenge this month -- how to quickly adapt their classes for long-distance learning. North Carolina teachers are getting creative to engage their students.

https://twitter.com/ncgop

In late December 2019, a staff member with the North Carolina Republican Party downloaded an email list with the contact information of more than 65,000 conservatives from across the state. The exporting of that data amounted to what at least two GOP operatives called the "largest breach of proprietary information in the history of the state party."

That email list is considered one of the party’s most valuable assets – potentially worth more than $100,000.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

U.S Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer purportedly imagined a Democrat would have to lock himself in a "windowless basement" and fundraise nonstop to beat incumbent GOP Sen. Thom Tillis in North Carolina. But, Cal Cunningham's campaign office has plenty of natural light. 

Cunningham got the stamp of approval from the DSCC's national recruiters. His primary campaign has benefitted from lots of outside money, including millions from VoteVets. Though the candidate wants to see an end to dark money. 

On this edition of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, Cunningham discusses the money in politics, who's supporting him, and why he should be North Carolina's next senator. 
 


Woman vaping holding a Juul podmod.
Courtesy of Vaping360 / vaping360.com/juul/juul-vapor-review/

While policymakers and parents are wringing their hands about how to get kids not to vape, a number of e-cigarette companies are offering college scholarships to teens. Authors of a new report in the journal Tobacco Control interpret the scholarships as a possible marketing scheme.

A map showing changes in state environmental agency funding comparing fiscal 2008 to 2018.
Courtesy of Environmental Integrity Project

A new report finds the North Carolina General Assembly cut funding for the state Department of Environmental Quality by approximately 34 percent over a decade. Only three other states in the country cut more funding for environmental regulators in the past decade.

A hallway with a row of red lockers at a public school in Durham.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

Board of Education officials in Johnston County are struggling to fill an almost $9 million dollar budget shortfall.  The board will ask county commissioners for more money at the Dec. 2 meeting.

Michelle Burton is a library media coordinator at an elementary school in Durham. On a normal day, she helps teachers and students with computers, manages the school library, and teaches students to use technology. One day last year, a box arrived unannounced. It was filled with bookmarks with State Superintendent Mark Johnson’s name prominently printed at the bottom.

Sample voting machines. North Carolina elections officials are deciding which voting machines are cleared to use the state.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Updated Aug. 27, 2019

The North Carolina Board of Elections will not require county boards to use hand-marked paper ballots in upcoming elections.

The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals  threatened legal action against the city of Greensboro, but backed off the threat when it was allowed to run an advertisement.

NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019. / NOAA

Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration discovered a methane seep field off the coast of Bodie Island in 2012, but they didn’t get a look at it until this year.

 Demolition crews dismantle the building at 806 N. Duke St., next to the site of the April gas explosion in Durham, N.C.
Elizabeth Friend / WUNC

The landscape of North Duke Street in Durham is slowly starting to change, three months after a deadly gas explosion tore apart a block near downtown.  

Demolition crews have leveled one building next to the site of the explosion at the Kaffeinate coffee shop. That address, 806 West Main Street, is the only one on the block with an active demolition permit, according to city records.

Wayne Lawrence / ProPublica

For generations, black landowners in the South relied on informal agreements, instead of wills, to keep property in the family. In a new article from investigative news outlet ProPublica, reporter Lizzie Presser investigated the story of a Carteret County family’s land loss and how African Americans across the country lost about 90% of their farmland between 1910 and 1997. Host Anita Rao talks with Lizzie Presser about the political, economic and emotional cost of black landholders losing their family property.

Vidal draws upon the traditions of Samba Reggae in his musical style.
Courtesy of Caique Vidal

Caique Vidal’s voice is robust and unequivocal over driving percussion and horn sections. In harmony with his band Batuque, the sound is rambunctious yet precise. The melodies spiral until you smile, and dancing feels required.

Durham Regional Hospital
Duke Medecine

North Carolina State Treasurer Dale Folwell is playing a massive game of chicken with every hospital in the state and more than a few doctors and provider practices.

water
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Wake County officials are urging private well owners in the eastern half of the county to test their water.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

A 3-2 majority of the state elections board ruled in favor of Republican Jody Greene on Monday, ordering the Columbus County Board of Elections to certify Greene's 37-vote victory in the 2018 county sheriff's race over Democratic incumbent Lewis Hatcher.

Image taken after a gas explosion in downtown Durham.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

The deadly explosion in downtown Durham earlier this month happened after a digging crew hit a natural gas line, leaving the combustible gas to fill at least one building.

Robert Brown Public Relations/Greg Lindberg / via AP

Businessman Greg Lindberg arrived on the North Carolina political scene in 2017 with a big fat check book. Previously unknown in political circles, he started making six-figure contributions and landed squarely on the radar of campaigns across the state.

Mr.TinDC / Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_t_in_dc/3345998000#

In June 2005, a 63-year-old woman was thrown from a tram at the North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro. It tipped and landed on her, seriously injuring her shoulder and requiring years of treatment. The state paid out $85,000 more than a decade later.

Rev. Curtis Gatewood
AlamanceCountyNC / youtube.com/watch?v=cg3TXJsaOJo

The leader of the Alamance NAACP chastised the county board of commissioners this week for supporting Sheriff Terry Johnson's immigration detention plan.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina headquarters in Durham.
BCBSNC

It's become cliché for executives of health systems and insurers to talk about the need to move away from a fee-for-service reimbursement model toward one that pays for value and rewards health providers for keeping patients healthy, not for simply treating them when they are sick.

Pages