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Resolved: Your Anti-Diet New Year Discussion Guide

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Resolved: Your Anti-Diet New Year Discussion Guide

Our three-part series "Resolved: Your Anti-Diet New Year" explores diet culture and how it shapes our relationships to our bodies and food. This discussion guide will take you deeper into each episode, introduce themes and big ideas to consider as you listen and give you bonus resources to keep learning about the guests and each of the topics. Dig in!
  • In this episode, Anita unpacks the science that props up diet culture with a registered dietician and certified internal medicine physician. They trace diet culture’s history as far back as ancient Greece and talk through some of society’s moralistic arguments against fatness. Anita also learns from an historian, an ultrarunner in a larger body and a transmasculine physical trainer’s assistant who’s working to make fitness spaces more inclusive.
  • In this episode, Anita explores intuitive eating: an approach to food and health that encourages tuning into your body’s signals about when, what and how much to eat. Anita talks to a neuroscientist about how our brains respond to dieting, and then two registered dieticians walk her through the 10 principles of intuitive eating, which include honoring your hunger, challenging the food police and practicing gentle nutrition.
  • In this episode, Anita examines a new framework for thinking about our bodies that is gaining traction: body neutrality. It’s a concept that focuses on who you are aside from your body and what rights your body deserves no matter how it looks. Anita talks with fat activists about their differing perspectives on the term and how it fits into the history of the fat acceptance movement. She also hears from a psychotherapist about how body neutrality can be a tool for raising kids to have healthier body image.