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Erin Toner

Erin Toner is a reporter for WUWM. Erin was WUWM's All Things Considered local host from 2006 to 2010. She began her public radio career in 1999 at WMUK in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Prior to joining WUWM in 2006, Toner spent five years at WKAR in East Lansing, Michigan.

During her career, Toner has served as a mentor for NPR's Next Generation Radio project, trained and mentored college students and taught a news reporting course at Michigan State University. She holds a degree in journalism from Michigan State University.

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  • Wisconsin Republicans are fast-tracking a "right to work" bill to Gov. Scott Walker. The law aims to weaken private sector unions by letting employees opt out of paying dues.
  • After years of cutbacks, Milwaukee Public Schools are re-hiring teachers for classes beyond the basics. They are hoping to retain students as well as boost attendance and test scores.
  • Several bio-tech companies are developing exoskeletons that give people superhuman abilities. But these robotic suits are also doing something simpler: They're helping paralyzed veterans walk again.
  • The state's Republican governor, Scott Walker, rejected federal funds to expand Medicaid coverage. But Wisconsin is also bringing more people into Medicaid while moving others to private insurance on the health exchanges under the Affordable Care Act.
  • As mobile devices dominate our work and personal lives, people are buying fewer pens, especially high-end ones. That's doomed many mom-and-pop pen shops, but a few are still holding on, relying on those who treat pens like jewelry.
  • Nationwide, many cash-strapped cities have raided funds intended for retirees or have chronically underfunded their pension systems. But despite a budget crunch, Milwaukee's fund has consistently ranked among the nation's top pension programs. Even so, some changes lie ahead for city workers.
  • As the school year begins, many principals are leading their schools for the first time. Keeping principals is a problem in many schools, and high-poverty, urban districts often have particularly high rates of turnover. Some experts say that revolving door can hurt student achievement.
  • Last August, a Sikh community in Wisconsin lost six of its members in a mass shooting before Sunday services. Some local Sikhs say they've become more devoted in the year since the tragedy, and have begun wearing turbans and long beards in an effort to raise awareness and understanding of the faith.
  • With the country still digging its way out of the recession, banks have severely tightened lending to small firms — making it harder for many to get back on their feet. But Daphne Wilson, an entrepreneur in Milwaukee, Wis., didn't let being turned down by four banks stop her.
  • The U.S. Bowling Congress is considering moving its headquarters out of Milwaukee, a city where bowling is as popular as beer. The group says the cost of doing business in Milwaukee is too high. If it moves, it would be another blow to a city that has lost much of its blue-collar industrial heritage, from manufacturing to brewing.