Dashiell Coleman

Dash joined WFAE as a digital editor for news and engagement in 2019. Before that, he was a reporter for the Savannah Morning News in Georgia and the Gaston Gazette in Gastonia. 

This is no ordinary year.

A pandemic is sweeping across the world as cries for changes to address systemic racism fill the streets of American cities. The economy is reeling, and a presidential election is looming. But sometimes self-expression thrives amid turmoil.

Updated 4:15 p.m.

Police say three people were killed and 11 others injured after a shooting at a block party in northwest Charlotte early Monday. Five of the people injured were hit by cars. 

Demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality are now in their third week in Charlotte. On Monday evening, about 75 protesters gathered at uptown's First Ward Park just before a light rain began to fall.

President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday evening that the RNC will be "forced to seek another state to host" the event that is slated to be held in Charlotte's Spectrum Center in August. The GOP, however, clarified that the "celebration of the president's acceptance" of the nomination will take place in another city, but the business side of the convention could remain in Charlotte.

As tensions mount over whether the 2020 Republican National Convention will actually be held in Charlotte during the coronavirus pandemic, North Carolina's governor is telling organizers they need to plan for a scaled-down event with face masks.

Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel, meanwhile, says the GOP is ready to "begin visiting" other cities and states for possible venues. 

Gov. Roy Cooper says the state can start the first part of a three-phase reopening plan Friday evening — but that doesn't mean North Carolina's stay-at-home order will be lifted immediately.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper says tighter social restrictions could be issued soon in the wake of the state's first two coronavirus-related deaths. 

Large parks seem like a natural fit for social distancing, right? After all, it should be easy to stay six feet away from other people in the woods — in theory. But a growing number of outdoor destinations are shutting their gates and telling visitors to take a hike as the coronavirus pandemic worsens.