Cass Herrington

Cass Herrington is BPR's Morning Edition host and news reporter. Her reporting largely focuses on stories dealing with health, race, and immigration. 

Before joining BPR in 2019, Herrington spent nearly seven years writing, reporting and hosting for NPR stations in Illinois and Indiana. 

Her reporting has earned numerous awards, including the designations of best reporter by the Associated Press Broadcaster’s Associations in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky.

In 2015, Cass received a prestigious national Edward R. Murrow award for a show she produced about non-verbal teens with Autism who rely on iPads to communicate.

A Kentucky native, Herrington graduated from the University of Kentucky with a degree in journalism, international studies and Spanish. She's fluent in Spanish, loves to travel, and is a proud, bleed-blue Kentucky Wildcats fan. 

Herrington also co-hosts a podcast, called Skillet, about the intersection of food and memory.

Voting can be a complicated process for many.  The pandemic is exposing that, with many rules  only just now being widely discovered for the first time.  For instance, North Carolina’s witness requirement on absentee ballots. 

For new American citizens, the process can be especially hard to navigate. 

 

It’s apple season in Western North Carolina. Hand-painted roadside signs boast cider doughnuts and homemade pies. The beloved seasonal fruit is picked by thousands of migrant farmworkers. But with the pandemic, advocates want the government to provide safer living and working conditions for the at-risk population.

 

North Carolina has become a sanctuary state for child predators. 

 

After a week of protests against police brutality in Asheville and across the country, local educators are using history to make sense of what feels like an unprecedented moment. 

Image of Asheville police car
Osajus / Flickr Creative Commons

The police chief in Asheville has apologized for the destruction of a medic station that was set up for people protesting police brutality and the death of George Floyd.

Henderson County is the lone sheriff’s department in Western North Carolina that participates in the federal 287(g) program.  That agreement allowed for a 25-year-old Hendersonville man to be deported after he was arrested last month, following a traffic stop.   

 

For Spanish learners, the city of Asheville is plentiful with opportunities to improve their language skills.

For a group of Buncombe County Schools Early College students, that means visiting McCormick Field, where players from Venezuela and the Dominican Republic are holding class.

 

Last week, the Trump administration outlined a plan to overhaul the country’s immigration system to prioritize applicants with college degrees over those with familial ties. But business leaders in Asheville say they need workers at all skill levels, particularly given the county’s record low unemployment rate.

 

Appalachian English is a term linguists use to describe the speech patterns of people in Appalachia. It’s also referred to as “mountain talk.”

But there’s variation within the dialect, just as there is among the nearly 26 million people who populate the diverse region, which covers 13 states.

 

Numerous studies on childbirth in the US present a grim fact  -- racial disparities persist in the delivery room. Rates of maternal and infant mortality during childbirth are disproportionately higher among African American women in Buncombe County, and nationwide.  

That stark reality is what prompted a group of women in Asheville to organize and start a doula service for women of color and for women without the financial means.