WUNC Music

WUNC Music is the place for music discovery in North Carolina. New Indie Rock, Alternative and straight ahead Rock and Roll is mixed in with old favorites and emerging local bands.

Listen to WUNC Music

Select WUNC Music from the blue Listen Live button at the top of this page.

Also, listen on the WUNC App (iOS or Android), via TuneIn or at 91.5 HD2 in the Triangle area.  You can also hear WUNC Music on your Smart Speaker!

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More music to discover:

Al Riggs promo photo
Dustin Britt

The ever prolific Al Riggs (they/them) is kicking off 2019 with the release of 'Godkiller,' an LP that they say is 'uglier' than some of their most recent work. While this may be the case thematically, there is quite a bit of beauty on these nine songs. Ominous lyrics touch on themes such as anxiety and queerness, while synths and acoustic guitar strums create an atmospheric back drop.

A picture of Mountain Man.
Elizabeth Weinberg

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

On this episode Eric Hodge chats with the North Carolina based folk trio Mountain Man about their song 'Rang Tang Ring Toon' from their 2018 album 'Magic Ship.'

The song is a playful romp that the band says came about organically. It's gone on to become one of their favorites to perform live.

Listen to the episode here:

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

A picture of Chris Stamey playing guitar.
Gardner Campbell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gardnercampbell/8554646232/

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

There was a time in our history when families gathered around the radio to listen to stories and music. WUNC produced a show from a couple years back that tries to rekindle that spirit. It's called 'Occasional Shivers' and was written by Chris Stamey. On this episode of the podcast we focus on the song that inspired the show.

A picture of Greg Hawks.
York Wilson Photography

Greg Hawks says his new record is a culmination of all of his musical influences. That means the songs on I Think It's Time contain nods to classic country, 1970s pop/rock, rhythmic soul and his roots in the American South.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

On this special episode, we take a look at the legacy of Big Star and focus on the 2017 tribute album Thank You, Friends: Big Star's Third Live...And More.

A picture of Michael Rank
Bowie Ryder / michaelrankmusic.com

Michael Rank is doubling down on his musical move to funk and soul. The Triangle-based singer/songwriter was known for his Stones-y, outlaw country swagger and dusty folk on a series of recordings before pivoting to Sly and The Family Stone and D'Angelo on last year's Another Love.

Photo of Amy Ray
Carrie Schrader

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

This time we take a look at Amy Ray's 'Didn't Know A Damn Thing,' from her latest solo album Holler. The song starts off like a country song complete with banjo, pedal steel and two-step back beat. But as the lyrics build, out comes a story about a white kid growing up in the Jim Crow South.

Listen to the episode here:

A picture of singer-songwriter Doug Paisley.
LP Photographs

Doug Paisley's new record Starter Home is a quiet beauty. The Canadian musician will remind you of Guy Clark, John Prine and Gordon Lightfoot, even as he puts his own stamp on a long tradition of singer-songwriters.

He recorded the new songs over a few years at several home studios in Toronto. Paisley will be at The Cat's Cradle Back Room in Carrboro tonight. 

Nathaniel Rateliff “Tearing at the Seams"

An image of Bill Hicks
Tom Carter

Old Time fiddler and songwriter Bill Hicks died this week.  He was 75 years old.   WUNC’s Program Director remembers him on this episode of the Songs We Love podcast with a close listen to his iconic song “The SOB In The Carvel Truck."

In a Facebook post announcing Bill’s passing the Red Clay Ramblers described their old friend as “...one of the finest musicians to come out of the 20th-century American South, and he leaves a great legacy of fiddling, singing, and songwriting."

An image of the band Mountain Man
Elizabeth Weinberg

Tune in to WUNC Music on Wednesday, November 14th at 5pm EST for the Mountain Man Radio Hour! Ahead of their shows at The Haw River Ballroom in Saxapahaw this weekend, Mountain Man has programmed a special hour of tunes for you.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

On this episode we're featuring 'He's A Lone Ranger' by Dom Flemons. It's a song off of his latest record Black Cowboys.

The record redefines the image of the American Cowboy with songs like the one featured here. It's one Dom wrote after hearing the story of Bass Reeves, who was born into slavery in 1838.

An image of the band Superchunk
Lissa Gotwals

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery station, WUNC Music.

This time we take a look at 'What A Time To Be Alive,' the title track from Superchunk's latest album.

The song, and the album of the same name, is a call to action. According to singer Mac McCaughan it was written in reaction to the current political climate.

Listen to the episode here:

It's not enough to make list after list. The Turning the Tables project seeks to suggest alternatives to the traditional popular music canon, and to do more than that, too: to stimulate conversation about how hierarchies emerge and endure. This year, Turning the Tables considers how women and non-binary artists are shaping music in our moment, from the pop mainstream to the sinecures of jazz and contemporary classical music. Our list of the 200 Greatest Songs By Women+ offers a soundtrack to a new century. This series of essays takes on another task.

A picture of Mountain Man.
Elizabeth Weinberg

The wait is over, and your patience is being rewarded. Mountain Man has released Magic Ship,  a new album of sparse and dreamy new Appalachian-inspired folk songs.  Amelia Meath (Sylvan Esso), Molly Sarle, and Alexandra Sauser-Monnig (ASM) have been busy with their other bands and with solo recordings since Mountain Man's debut Made the Harbor was released eight years ago. 

"I am a rap legend, just go ask the kings of rap," Nicki Minaj spat in her 2014 hit "Feelin' Myself," claiming her space within a rap patriarchy she altered simply by stepping a Manolo-clad toe into it. Beyoncé, her duet partner, expressed her power a different way. "Male or female, it make no difference," she declared. "I stop the world." These verses offer two different ways to think about artistic influence: one unfolds over time within a particular lineage; the other hits in the moment, altering the reality of everyone within earshot.

'Swamp Rock' Master Tony Joe White Has Died At 75

Oct 26, 2018

Tony Joe White, a songwriter and recording artist with the laid back but slightly dangerous demeanor of a well fed alligator, parlayed a unique take on swamp rock and country blues into an influential 50-year career. The Louisiana native died of a heart attack at home in Leiper's Fork on Thursday at age 75. Only a month ago, White released a new album and made his debut on the Grand Ole Opry.

Mamie Flemons (Dom's Grandmother)
From Flemons Family Collection

The second season of Dom Flemon's American Songster Radio podcast is released today, Friday, October 26.

In this episode of American Songster Radio, Dom discusses the song “Black Woman” and revisits the lives of figures like Bridget “Biddy” Mason and “Stagecoach” Mary Fields.  He also shares his own version of “Black Woman,” performed live on stage.

Dom Flemons
Tim Duffy / Music Maker

This is episode two from season two of American Songster Radio.

Black Cowboys
Tim Duffy / Music Maker

This is episode three from season two of American Songster Radio.

Charles Henry Flemons (Dom's father) in Texas with Cousin Slick
From Flemons Family Collection

This is epsidoe four from season two of American Songster Radio.

Black Cowboys
Tim Duffy

This is episode five from season two of American Songster Radio.

Dom Flemons' "Black Cowboys"
Tim Duffy

This is the sixth and final episode from season two of American Songster Radio.

A single voice can send a powerful message - and that's just what Jim James did at the Tiny Desk, with just his voice and an acoustic guitar. His lead-off song, "I'm Amazed," comes from My Morning Jacket's 2008 album Evil Urges. It's a prophetic song in many ways - it speaks not only of a divided nation and the need for justice but also to the beauty in the life and plight of others.

WATCH "Black Woman" By Dom Flemons Video Premiere

Oct 25, 2018
Vania Kinard
Tim Duffy

WUNC is proud to present the world premiere of the video for "Black Woman" performed by Dom Flemons. The song was explained in the first episode of Season 2 of the American Songster Podcast and is included on Dom’s “Black Cowboys” release on Smithsonian Folkways.

Banner Logo for American Songster Radio Season Two Preview Episode
Tim Duffy / Keith Weston / Music Maker / WUNC

The cowboy is an icon of American culture. But the popular image of the white cowboy skews our perception of what kind of Americans did—and do—cowboying work. 

The American West after the Civil War was a dynamic and ethnically diverse place. As many as a quarter of the cowboys during the frontier era were African Americans.  

Photo of Amy Ray
Carrie Schrader

Singer-songwriter Amy Ray is bringing her new album Holler to Durham next week.

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