Dana Terry

PRODUCER, "THE STATE OF THINGS"

Dana is an award-winning producer who began as a personality at Rock 92.  Once she started creating content for morning shows, she developed a love for producing.  Dana has written and produced for local and syndicated commercial radio for over a decade.  WUNC is her debut into public radio and she’s excited to tell deeper, richer stories. 

Ways to Connect

Valeria Watson

  The Appalachian region is an expansive stretch of hundreds of thousands of miles from the mountains of New York to Mississippi. It is home to more than 25 million people who celebrate diverse cultural traditions, yet its stereotype as a region filled with poor, white farmers still looms large. In the 90s, writer Frank X Walker coined the term “Affrilachia,” to chip away at those stereotypes and render visible the life and work of a more diverse array of residents.

Areon Mobasher

Marie Antoinette’s biggest crime was being born to a family of wealth and privilege during a time of political upheaval. She was executed by guillotine. 

a flooded area with a man wading through water
Buzzfeed News

  Days before Hurricane Florence hit, rural Jones County ordered a mandatory evacuation for all residents. Left were behind dozens of migrant farm workers who woke up on Sept.15 to find waist-high deep water and property floating away.

photo of Tena Clark
photo by Stephanie Rocha

 Tena Clark may not be a household name, but most people have heard her music. She has written and produced for legends like Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle and Leann Rimes. She won a Grammy for her work with Natalie Cole, and contributed to the soundtracks for hit movies like “Hope Floats” and “My Best Friend’s Wedding.”

a poster of Brett Kavanaugh that says "Kava Nope" in front of the Supreme Court Building in D.C.
(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) / AP

Millions of Americans were glued to their screens last Thursday when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford told her story of sexual assault to the Senate Judiciary Committee and an angry Brett Kavanaugh defended his name against the allegations. A similar battle played out more than two decades ago during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings.

photo of Mirsad Hadzikadic
courtesy of Mirsad Hadzikadic

Mirsad Hadzikadic left his home of Yugoslavia in 1984 to earn a Ph.D. in the United States. He spent more than three decades as a professor of computer science at the University of North Carolina Charlotte but never forgot his roots.

headshot of author and former radio DJ Jo Maeder
courtesy of Jo Maeder

When writer Jo Maeder’s parents split up, she vividly remembers her dad announcing: I’m retiring and moving to Miami. Who is coming with me? She was eager to pick up her life and start anew and spent her late high school and early college years under her father’s supervision. But despite the time they spent together, Maeder feels like she did not really get to know her father until after he passed away.

Courtesy of Nefesh Mountain

Many subgenres of bluegrass can be quickly traced back to Christian values and ideals, but that is not the case for the music of Nefesh Mountain. The husband and wife team fuse traditional bluegrass music with elements of their own Jewish heritage and traditions. They were recognized for this approach during a panel discussion about diversity and inclusion at this year’s International Bluegrass Music Association business conference. 

What happens when the world of fine art and the world of filmmaking meet? This month on Movies on the Radio, The State of Things is not tackling the art of movie-making, but rather the art of making movies about art. 

Erin Patrice O'Brien

When Nathalie Joachim was studying flute at Juilliard, Allison Loggins-Hull was pursuing her own love for the flute closeby at the State University of New York’s Purchase Conservatory of Music. Imagine two young African-American flutists both from the New York tri-state area who had never crossed paths until Myspace. 

a graphic of a film projector with film behind it
Creative Commons

In the mid-70s the president of Delta Sigma Theta sorority came up with a novel idea that could have changed the way Hollywood did business.

Linda Rupert

Tropical Depression Florence is well inland, but North Carolina is still reeling from the storm. All of the state’s 100 counties have experienced some form of National Weather System alert, from flash flood watch to hazardous weather outlook.

 In a two-hour special broadcast to stations around North Carolina, The State of Things speaks with residents, journalists, officials and experts about the devastating storm impact. 

Vehicles drive through water from the White Oak River flooding Highway 24 as Hurricane Florence hit Swansboro N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018.
Tom Copeland / AP Photo

North Carolina is feeling the effects of Hurricane Florence. The major storm is expected to cause catastrophic flooding and long power outages. Host Frank Stasio talks to WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and WUNC politics reporter Rusty Jacobs for the latest from the governor and on state response.

AP Photo/Chuck Burton

Hurricane Florence, which is now a Category 2 storm, continues to bear down on the Carolina coast. The National Weather Service says it is likely to be “the storm of a lifetime” for certain portions of that coastline. Officials have ordered the evacuation of over 1 million people from the coasts of North and South Carolina. Scott Sharp, a senior forecaster with the National Weather Service in Raleigh speaks with host Frank Stasio with the latest report.

Traci Arney

After an enchanting vacation at age 12, Lee Zacharias was convinced of what could make her life perfect: living in a small town on the shores of Lake Michigan. 

ArtsGreensboro

Greensboro-based Titus Gant is not only a jazz musician, but a music educator who helps bring music to the economically disadvantaged. 

Laura Pellicer / WUNC

The Triangle knows him as the night jock for K-97.5/WQOK where he plays hip-hop and R&B. Dion “Showtime” Chavis joins host Frank Stasio to tell the stories behind the voice.

Courtesy of Heather Evans Smith / Merge Records

Heather McEntire is best known as the lead singer and songwriter for the group Mount Moriah. After 10 years with the band, with three albums under their belt, the group took a hiatus, and McEntire tried her hand at a solo album.

Carolina Performing Arts launches its new season with an event that challenges society’s narrow view of citizenship. The collaborative piece asks: what if citizenship was defined by how someone contributes instead of where someone was born?

 

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There was a time when we could agree to disagree and still be civil at work, play, and the dinner table.

a photo of theologian Stanley Hauerwas
courtesy of Duke Divinity School

The responsibilities of a godparent can range from showering a child with gifts to stepping in as a surrogate in a moment of crisis.

Gina Hawkins made history last summer when she became the first woman and first African-American police chief of Fayetteville. She is now one of six African-American women at the helm of police departments around the state. But when Hawkins took the job, she had no idea it would garner so much national attention, including an interview on NBC’s “Megyn Kelly Today.”

Martha Kelly as Martha on "Baskets"
courtesy of Martha Kelly

When Martha Kelly was 18, she knew comedy was her career of choice. Paralyzed by fear, Kelly took what appeared to be an easier road and enrolled in college.

oil painting of Girl with a Pearl Earring
Johannes Vermeer

Jackson Pollock, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Frida Kahlo: all had rich stories to match their art. And those stories were further dramatized in the aptly-named Hollywood films “Pollock,” “Basquiat,” and “Frida.”

Gabriella Bulgarelli / WUNC

They call it psychedelic-hillbilly-rock, but the singer-songwriter duo Ladies Gun Club also embraces the term Americana.

Courtesy of Nancy Buirski

During her speech at the Golden Globes, Oprah introduced many people to Recy Taylor, a 24-year-old sharecropper who was gang raped in 1940s Alabama and risked her life to seek justice. 

Sylvia Freeman

Jaki Shelton Green spent her childhood with her nose in a book knowing there was a great big world that awaited her. A native of Orange County, North Carolina, Green was a fidgety child and her grandmother’s solution was to give her a writing pad. This simple gesture meant to keep her still in church, blossomed into a lifelong journey. 

Dana Verkouteren / AP Photo

Republicans declared victory in the Ohio special election even though thousands of provisional ballots have yet to be counted. What do the results mean for the November elections? Though these tight races may signal a blue wave, there’s also a pink wave with women breaking a record for the number of gubernatorial primary wins.

Courtesy of Eric Hirsh

Eric Hirsh’s parents met at a conservatory, so music was a staple in their home. Like many children, he began music lessons at a young age. But how many take jazz piano at the tender age of eight? Jazz would become his love. 

Courtesy of Frank R. Baumgartner / Cambridge University Press

20 million people are pulled over annually in traffic stops throughout the United States, according to The Stanford Open Policing Project. New data shows a disproportionate number of those motorists in North Carolina are black. The findings come from a comprehensive analysis of every traffic stop in the state from 2002 to 2016. 

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