Voter ID

Amy Townsend / WUNC

North Carolina students face a new roadblock when it comes to participating in the next U.S. election. Most of the state’s public universities have until Nov. 15 to re-apply for their student identification to be used as valid photo ID at polling places. Nearly half of N.C. higher education institutions missed the initial March deadline and had to scramble to meet a new deadline on Oct. 26.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

Gov. Roy Cooper has signed into law altered rules on how student and government employee identification cards can qualify as voter IDs, which are required for casting ballots in North Carolina elections starting next year.

Michael Kasino

The American Issues Initiative’s new documentary “Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook,” wants to alarm people. It shows the myriad tactics that states, including North Carolina, used to suppress citizens’ right to vote leading up to and during the 2016 election.

“Many people don’t understand that a whole series of laws have been passed in over 20 states with the intent, and effect, of making it more difficult to vote,” says Mac Heller, co-executive producer on the film.

The Belltower at N.C. State University.
NC State

Bipartisan legislation would ease some standards that identification cards for North Carolina colleges, universities and other institutions had to meet before they could be used as photo voter ID in next year's elections.

Photo: 'Vote Here' sign in English and Spanish
Flickr user Erik Hersman

Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper says a trial judge's ruling striking down North Carolina's new constitutional amendment mandating photo identification to vote "has a sound basis" in the law but ultimately will be resolved by higher courts.

Voter stickers
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

A judge will soon decide whether one of many pending lawsuits challenging North Carolina's new photo voter identification laws should go to trial.

Then North Carolina NAACP president, Rev. William Barber, center at podium, gestures as he is surrounded by supporters during a news conference at the Third Street Bethel AME Church in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, June 21, 2016.
Steve Helber / AP

Republican legislative leaders have appealed a court ruling striking down new North Carolina constitutional amendments mandating photo identification to vote and lower caps on income tax rates.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Six local chapters of the North Carolina NAACP are suing the state legislature over its new voter ID law.

State lawmakers voted on Dec. 19, 2018 to override North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper's veto of voter ID. The move means photo ID at the polls is now law.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

The Republican-controlled state Legislature steamrolled Governor Roy Cooper's veto of a newly crafted bill requiring a photo ID for in-person voting in North Carolina.

A sample ballot for the 2018 midterm elections
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

North Carolina's governor has vetoed legislation implementing a voter photo identification mandate added to the state's constitution in a recent referendum.

File photo of NC GOP Executive Director Dallas Woodhouse.
Adhiti Bandlamudi / WUNC

State GOP Chair Dallas Woodhouse said he wants the state elections board to fully lay out the facts in its investigation of North Carolina's 9th Congressional District race between Republican Mark Harris and Democrat Dan McCready.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

The North Carolina General Assembly has finalized legislation implementing the voter photo identification mandate approved in a statewide referendum last month.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

A voter photo identification bill won state House approval Wednesday, a proposal now also altered to try to improve absentee ballot security in North Carolina in light of fraud allegations in a congressional district.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Legislation designed to carry out a new constitutional amendment requiring photo identification to vote in person in North Carolina is closing in on another key General Assembly vote.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

House lawmakers will continue committee debate on a voter ID bill today, as one lingering question may soon get an answer.

A picture of an 'I Voted' sticker.
Vox Efx / Flickr

State legislators are working on an implementation bill for the newly-passed constitutional amendment that requires photo identification to vote. The amendment passed in November’s midterm elections with more than 55 percent of the vote. 

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Around 200 protesters gathered Tuesday morning in Raleigh's Bicentennial Mall across Jones Street from the North Carolina General Assembly.

State Rep. David Lewis (R-Harnett) talks with reporters after a session of the Joint Legislative Elections Oversight Committee on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

A joint committee of state lawmakers met Monday to discuss voter ID legislation. The meeting comes ahead of Tuesday's special session of the North Carolina General Assembly.

Photo: A voting ballot
Flickr Creative Commons/ Ken Zirkel

North Carolina legislators are providing several options to vote under a proposed bill that would require photo identification at the polls. Earlier this month voters gave lawmakers approval to amend the state constitution to mandate ID at the ballot box.

Screen shot: Senator Phil Berger "Protect Voter ID"
Phil Berger

Now what? That might be the question for many North Carolinians after voters approved a constitutional amendment requiring photo identification at the polls.

Two people registering to vote.
Tech. Sgt. Raheem Moore / U.S. Air Force

Six proposed constitutional amendments on the November ballot could impact key aspects of state government. But there is not much information available about how these amendments would be implemented.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

North Carolina Republicans have been thwarted by veto and federal judges this decade to require photo identification to vote. Now they're hoping state residents will cement the mandate by amending the state constitution.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

Updated 8:52 a.m. | June 8, 2018

Republicans are poised again to advance a photo identification requirement to vote in North Carolina, despite their previous attempt getting struck down by federal judges.

A sample REAL ID, with the identifying gold star.
https://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/driver/realid/ / NCDOT

It's been a year since North Carolina began offering REAL ID cards in compliance with federal law, which requires extra documentation to get the card.

Thomas Farr, with right hand raised, is sworn in during a Senate Judiciary Committee.
Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Thomas Farr is a Raleigh-based lawyer who has counseled North Carolina Republicans on a multitude of racially divisive cases.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

State lawmakers are considering another voter ID bill that would be brought to voters as a constitutional amendment. In 2013 lawmakers passed a voter ID measure that was deemed unconstitutional last year by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals . 

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

In July 2013, North Carolina lawmakers passed the Voter Information Verification Act – known more commonly as voter ID.  It’s a controversial law that was ultimately struck down in federal court for being unconstitutional. Nearly four years later, state legislators are now working on another voter ID bill that would be taken to voters as a constitutional amendment, according to sources.

Photo: The U.S. Supreme Court building
Sno Shuu / Flickr Creative Commons

The Supreme Court announced this morning that it will not review North Carolina’s controversial 2013 voter ID law. 

Ben and Jerry's, Voter ID
Leoneda Inge

The Supreme Court will not review North Carolina’s invalidated Voter ID Law, leaving in place a ruling by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals that had struck down the law. A lower court ruled that some provisions in the law "target African Americans with almost surgical precision," and therefore unconstitutional.

Voting sign
Wikipedia Commons

A new report from the Electoral Integrity Project, based at Harvard University and the University of Sydney, indicates that North Carolina can no longer be considered a functioning democracy. 

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