Bringing The World Home To You

© 2021 WUNC North Carolina Public Radio
120 Friday Center Dr
Chapel Hill, NC 27517
919.445.9150 | 800.962.9862
91.5 Chapel Hill 88.9 Manteo 90.9 Rocky Mount 91.1 Welcome 91.9 Fayetteville 90.5 Buxton
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Politics
00000177-6edd-df44-a377-6fff44880001Related: Live National Updates From NPR

Attorney General Roy Cooper Enters Governor Race

Roy Cooper announces his bid for governor before a crowd in Rocky Mount.
Jess Clark
/

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper announced his run for the democratic nomination for governor last night in Rocky Mount.

Cooper’s announcement was no surprise. The attorney general has been open about his desire to run since at least 2013. He took the stage at Nash County Community College near his hometown of Nashville, in eastern North Carolina.

“It is time for our state to work for everyone, not just the few," Cooper told the crowd. "That’s why today I am announcing that I am a candidate for governor of North Carolina.”

Cooper is the second Democrat to jump in the race, after Durham attorney Ken Spaulding. But in his speech, Cooper focused criticism on Governor Pat McCrory and his support for corporate tax breaks and other policies Cooper says only benefit the wealthiest North Carolinians. 

"Roy Cooper has been part of the political class inside the Raleigh belt-line for the last 30 years."

“Governor McCrory has the wrong priorities for North Carolina—giving away the store to those at the top at the expense of the middle class and our schools," he said.

Schools came up more than a few times in Cooper’s speech, as he hit the governor and General Assembly for their decisions about education funding.

“Our schools are starved for resources. Our best and brightest teachers are leaving for better pay and more respect,” he said.

"Governor McCrory has the wrong priorities for North Carolina—giving away the store to those at the top at the expense of the middle class and our schools."

Cooper served in the legislature for 15 years, first in the House and then the Senate, before he became Attorney General in 2001. Cooper’s long career in state politics was one thing North Carolina GOP executive director Dallas Woodhouse highlighted in a news conference before the announcement—but not as a good thing.

“It is important to remember that Roy Cooper has been part of the political class inside the Raleigh belt-line for the last 30 years," Woodhouse said.

Woodhouse also blasted Cooper for voting for tax hikes and spending increases during his time as a lawmaker.

As of June 30, Cooper’s campaign had out-raised McCrory’s by $900,000.

More Stories