Politics

Political news from around NC and beyond.

Congressman Robert Pittenger
Reinis Inkens / Wikimedia Commons

Some U.S. House races that were once considered reliably Republican are becoming more competitive, and three of these districts are in North Carolina. 

An image of a gavel
creative commons

A North Carolina Supreme Court candidate fighting to have his party affiliation listed on the November ballot has won a second victory in court.

From left, former North Carolina governors Jim Hunt, Jim Martin Mike Easley, Beverly Perdue, and Pat McCrory.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

North Carolina's five living former governors on Monday delivered an extraordinary rebuke of the Republican-dominated legislature for two constitutional amendments it put on fall ballots, saying they would shred gubernatorial power and government checks and balances if approved.

Dana Verkouteren / AP Photo

Republicans declared victory in the Ohio special election even though thousands of provisional ballots have yet to be counted. What do the results mean for the November elections? Though these tight races may signal a blue wave, there’s also a pink wave with women breaking a record for the number of gubernatorial primary wins.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Four of the six constitutional amendments state Republican legislators want on the fall ballot now face a legal battle. 

NC Legislative Building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Stateline’s annual legislative review analyzes how political trends affect policy questions in legislatures around the country. This year’s findings examine decisions about Medicaid expansion, the impact of the #MeToo movement on policy and behavior, the changing power of unions, gun control legislation in the wake of the Las Vegas and Parkland shootings, and the ongoing fight over sanctuary cities and immigration policy. 

File photo of North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper. The governor addressed the Emerging Issues Forum on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018 at North Carolina State University.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Updated 3:25 p.m.

North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and other opponents of legislative Republicans filed a flurry of late-hour lawsuits Monday to block referendums on constitutional amendments and to let a Supreme Court candidate disclose his party affiliation on ballots.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

12:15 p.m.

The Republican-controlled General Assembly has made quick work of passing two laws related to language on North Carolina ballots this fall despite the formal objections of Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

Emre Tazegul / AP Photo

Last week, North Carolina pastor Andrew Brunson was moved from a jail in Turkey to house arrest until his trial continues in October. Brunson has spent 23 years in Turkey raising a family and serving as an evangelical minister. 

Photo: Rep. Tim Moore and NC House GOP Leadership
Jorge Valencia

The Republican-controlled General Assembly is planning rare weekend floor sessions to handle two vetoes by Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

House Republicans on Wednesday filed articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. The lawmakers, including Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), say Rosenstein has withheld documents from Congress and has mishandled his job overseeing the special counsel investigation. The move demonstrates a widening division within the GOP on the handling of the probe into President Trump.

NC State House
NCGA

Lawmakers returned to Raleigh this week for a special session to determine the titles for six proposed constitutional amendments. The amendments will be put to voters this November and include controversial items like a voter ID measure and a push to limit the governor’s appointment powers.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

The North Carolina legislature returned briefly to business Tuesday so Republicans could wrest the seemingly ordinary work of adding titles to proposed constitutional amendments on November ballots out of the hands of a state panel controlled by Democrats.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

In closely divided North Carolina, an intense power struggle between Republican lawmakers and Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper will shift from the General Assembly and courts to voting booths this fall.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr Creative Commons

Powerful, wealthy organizations like the National Rifle Association might want to buy elections, but campaign finance laws stop them from doing so. At least, they’re supposed to.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

President Donald Trump is in the United Kingdom for a two-day visit with British leaders. The visit turned awkward after the president blasted U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May in the press one day before the two were set to meet. He told a British tabloid that May ignored his advice on Brexit and that her political rival Boris Johnson would make an excellent prime minister.

Areas that could potentially be leased for offshore oil and gas drilling are shown on a map displayed Monday, March 5, 2018, at an open house hosted by the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to provide information and gather public comment on the T
Ted S. Warren / AP

President Trump is putting coastal Republicans in a tight spot this election cycle with his proposal to open waters off the Atlantic coast to oil and gas exploration.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Lawmakers have retreated to their home districts following a frenetic short session.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and discuss the budget, proposed constitutional amendments, as well as what legislators did not address.

Editor's Note: This Week In NC Politics will take a break for the rest of July and will be back in early August.

 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This year's session at the General Assembly felt, at times, like a blur.

WRAL Capitol Bureau Chief Laura Leslie joins the podcast to discuss the pace of the Legislature, some of the most significant measures, and how policy may influence the already underway election season.

Leslie, who worked at WUNC from 2004 until 2011, also weighs in on the departure of a key legislative staffer and shares what she misses most about public radio.

Editor's Note: The WUNCPolitics Podcast will take a break for the rest of July and will be back in early August.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers have returned home following a hectic, six-week session during which they approved a state spending plan, continued an ongoing clash with the Governor, and for the most part, avoided any major controversy.

abstract art of a world map
Art by Nicholas Raymond / http://freestock.ca/flags_maps_g80-world_map__abstract_acrylic_p2970.html

In the middle of a landmass in the Northern Hemisphere bordered by oceans, people call themselves Americans. According to both their own laws and broader international ones, they are members of a group known as a nation-state – in this case the United States of America.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

Should North Carolina voters show a photo ID to vote in person? That will be just one of six questions voters will decide when they head to the polls in November. Legislators approved the sixth ballot question just before adjourning the spring legislative session Friday.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

The Republican-controlled General Assembly wrapped up its short session Friday, passing an adjusted budget in time for the start of the fiscal year, above the objections of Democrats and Governor Roy Cooper’s veto.

Seth Wenig / AP Photo

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement this week and sparked panic among many Democrats. During his time on the nation’s highest bench, he cast deciding votes on LGBTQ rights, abortion and the death penalty. President Trump has vowed to replace Kennedy’s seat with a more conservative justice.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Updated 4:07 p.m. | June 29, 2018

North Carolina's Republican lawmakers are asking the public for a fresh mandate to block voting by people without certain kinds of photo identification, two years after their earlier attempt to make that a state law got thrown out by federal judges.

Supreme Court building, Washington, DC, USA. Front facade.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Daderot

Updated 1:40 p.m. | June 28, 2018

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Thursday that lingering racial bias infected some General Assembly district boundaries approved last year, but its ruling leaves intact the district lines already used earlier this year for this fall's elections.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Bills altering early in-person voting and restricting litigation against large livestock operations by neighbors unhappy with odors and other nuisances became North Carolina law Wednesday, despite formal objections by Gov. Roy Cooper.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Republicans in the General Assembly rode their majority to pass three more proposed constitutional amendments Tuesday. 

North Carolina legislative building
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Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed seven bills just before a Monday night deadline, deciding to block Republican proposals to alter early in-person voting and restrict nuisance litigation that neighbors of big livestock operations could file in North Carolina.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Updated 4:10 p.m.

North Carolina General Assembly committees have advanced proposed constitutional amendments addressing judicial vacancies, crime victims' rights and the composition of the state elections board.

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